Adobe Mobile Drawing Techniques

Lesson 4 of 8

Making a Brush in Capture

 

Adobe Mobile Drawing Techniques

Lesson 4 of 8

Making a Brush in Capture

 

Lesson Info

Making a Brush in Capture

So going back to Capture now, you can make lots and lots of other things with this app. But what we're going to make here is we're going to make a brush in Capture. So earlier today, what I did was, these are some brushes I've made earlier on. I actually photographed a piece of paper. Now just very briefly, I'm just going to wake up my camera and show you the piece of paper that I used. So if I just get the camera here, and hover that over like so. I've got the stand in the way, from the... You can see that, there's the sticker. There's some marks I made, some other things that we'll use very shortly. I'm not going to tell you what that is but I got something and splashed it on it. It's a piece of food. But I dropped it on there so I got an interesting shape from that. I'll turn the camera off and go back into Capture. I'll just tell the camera to go away, there we go. Go back to Capture. And making brushes is much fun in here. If you've ever made a brush for Photoshop or Illustrator b...

efore, it's a lot of tweaking around. Testing one thing and adjusting another, okay, so you get it, you come in, you change something here. It is very, very, very dynamic and I'm going to show you that. So I'm gonna tap the camera at the bottom of the screen, okay, and let me just get rid of that first run stuff that goes on. So there's the camera and I actually meant to tap the image. It doesn't matter because up at the top right, I've got an image icon. So I can swap out there and choose a source. It doesn't have to come directly from our camera role, it might be something I've made previously, it might be one of my Creative Cloud files, something Light Room, something from Adobe Stock or here on IOS, something in my files. I'm going to go the camera roll and I made a picture of the splash earlier. Actually that's the one from Capture so I'm gonna go back there. I was too keen there to jump in on that. Here's the piece of paper like so. Now watch the white of the paper because the assumption here that the program makes by default is that the paper you're working on is white. And if I move the slider on the right hand side, you can see how it removes that paper white. Now if your paper is another color other than white, and that's why I needed this, or one of the reasons I needed this particular splash here. Can you see there's a dot up in the top left of the screen, okay? Then all I need to do is to just tap with that. That dot is where it's taking the information form. Can you see that I tapped on that color and now it's using that as transparency, okay? So it's taking that as the base color. And if you've done something, I've done this before on pastel paper where I've made a mark with a pastel crayon or a piece of chalk, something with a bit of a tooth to it and then try to turn that into a brush. I'm just gonna return that back to the paper white here and let's choose, we'll try and do, if we can, we'll try and do a couple. But I'm gonna choose the one on the lower right just here. So I'm going to just hit the tick there for the moment. Okay and what it's doing, it's taking everything at the minute so I need to kind of crop that. Look at the right hand side here at the minute and this area where it says tail, body and head. I'm just gonna drag like so, so I'm just pinching here, reverse pinching with my fingers. And hopefully you might be able to see that in the overhead camera there. Okay, that as I pinch like so, you can see hopefully how I'm lining that up. Right, I'm lining it up so there's a little bit of it poking it into the tail area, okay? And a little bit poking out into the head area. You can move this around, I'm just using one finger there to move that around like so, okay. And you can change the relationship between the body, head and tail. So I'm gonna make that so it's a little bit wider. Hopefully you've also noticed that the actual stroke that's on the canvas to the left is actually changing dynamically as I do that, okay? So it's completely responsive, I get an idea of how this is going to work. And if I need to, there's a small widget down at the bottom. I can collapse that up and now that's becoming much more like the particular stroke I'd like to use here. So I'm gonna swap out to styles. There's a range of four things across the top of the screen here. So I'm gonna swap to styles and at the moment it's showing me for the last style, I've got Adobe Sketch brushes underneath that, brushes that work in both Sketch and Photoshop Sketch beneath that. And then Illustrator CC brushes underneath that and so I can do that. And if I need to, I can come back into this crop area and change that as well. And pretty much, this is one that we'll just tail from over there. Let me go with the last style actually. If I go for the Adobe Sketch brush here, let's use that one there. We'll now go into the presets which is like the dynamics of the brush. this is where you can change how the brush behaves in use and this canvas is completely dynamic. Unfortunately you can only make a single stroke but it gives you an idea of how this is going to work. So if you wanted to think, how's this going to work for a quirky cat, I could try those strokes out there. So I can change the default size for the brush which will change it's appearance. I'm gonna make that quite big, gonna make that about 40 there and the flow, so how opaque it is, 100%. If it's gonna be color or black and white, you can do some really interesting things by bringing in a color image because it becomes like drawing with funky toothpaste. Or if you imagine a tube of maybe acrylic paint that's full of several different colors and you're squeezing that out and you get the same reliable set of colors, you can use that. But I'm gonna use black and white just here for this. So it's got no color. How it works, so this is gonna to mirror, if it repeats or if it stretches. And all of those things will change the quality of that line. How it responds to pressure, so what the percentage is that it will vary, okay, by pressure. If I vary at 100%, big variation. I'm gonna go for about 50% and if it varies the flow or not, which actually it doesn't so I'm just gonna leave that set at around zero there like so. How it behaves with velocity, if that changes the size. Again I'm gonna set that down and how it behaves with flow. You can add some noise texture into there as well and anti-aliasing if you want to because this is for Photoshop Sketch. Have it taper and or fade on the end there as well. Once you've done that, you've got a refinement option here. This is where you can actually still tune for that paper texture and even add in and paint out down here in the bottom right hand corner so you can actually paint out elements. So we're just gonna paint out this bit here. I'll switch that to minus and then just paint there and just tune that and of course it will have an impact on the brush that's actually in the drawing area just there. So I'm gonna save that. We're going to call this one, not brush eight, that's really, any suggestions for a brush name? I got nothing. You've got nothing? I'll tell you what, I'm gonna call it Jamie who's our line producer just there, she gets something named after her. There you go too. So that's going into Mobile Magic as well. We'll do one other brush here. We've got time to do one other brush. I'm pretty sure here, so we'll do that, just now. Let's go on and make another one. So again, we'll go to the images here. Camera roll, go back to the file that we had earlier. This time we're gonna go for the splash just there. Gonna tune out that paper white, not quite as much here because I don't want to lose completely the texture of that splash, okay? I just tapped on that by accident. So I'm just gonna come back and just bring that forward. I'm gonna hit the tick on the right hand side. I'm not gonna bother about the cropping just at the moment because first of all, I'm gonna swap out for the styles and make a scatter brush, that's here in the Photoshop and Photoshop Sketch brushes there. And then go back to the crop, okay? And so now I can move that around and crop that in to how I want it to be and I'm just gonna twist that about I think, just a bit there like so. I think that'll make it really interesting shape. I'm gonna call this brush Gravy, 'cause that's what it is. (laughing) Vegetarian gravy but it's still gravy. Juice, that's a better word, there you go. So here I can change the size, right like so. Same as before, let's make another straight stroke here for this, okay? In fact no, curve, let's go curved. There we are. Okay, minimum size so again that tells me, you know, if it responds to pressure, what's the variation just there? Okay there's no pressure on this stroke at the moment. It's not turned on. If I turn on pressure, just a couple of rows below you can see how that's starting to change there and I can change the relationship between those two things. How it follows my trajectory, so here a directional means it will bend to the direction of my trajectory there, like so, okay? And a flow is a variable component. Spacing here, how can space that out like so. So I'm just going wild on that out there. Right going out like that. Let me just come along and do that. I'm gonna change that minimum size variable there and make this brush a bit bigger. Okay, like so. And scatter, how it's scattered around and you can change whether it's on both axis. So now I'm gonna bring that in tight and I'm actually gonna reduce the spacing 'cause I like these brushes that look a little bit like worn graphite, right? And by that I mean you've gone over it several strokes and bits of the, tiny, tiny bits of the graphite have flaked off as it's gone around there so you get this sort of slight fuzziness to it which I think is really attractive. I've then got some controls here called jitter, okay? So that's the amount of variability you've got there so the size jitter in there, I'm gonna leave that about half way. Angle, I'm gonna let that go the whole way so that, you can see how that spins around? I turn that off, it's just like super furry caterpillar brush. If I turn it on, and it becomes much more interesting and also the flow variation there is running. Fact, I'm gonna have zero flow variation I think or very, very little for that. Go to refine again. There's some things in here I don't need so I'm gonna tap minus there and just paint those out. I want that actual bit in there. That will change the resulting brush of course but this actually give me exactly what I'm after there. Now let's save and then we'll call this one Tofu Juice. Whatever was on that, stuff was great. So we'll call it that. There you go, Gravy's not the right term. There you go, into Mobile Magic and save. Let's try those out in Photoshop Sketch in just a second. First of all, or actually we've made our shape thinking about it in Capture so we can leave that as it is and we will actually go out to Photoshop Sketch so just jump into that just there. I'm gonna choose or show you the process for choosing a brush. Okay so what I'm gonna do is long press on any of the brushes here in the tools on the left hand side. And by the way, if you don't see any tools there, right? It's probably because the application's in full-screen mode like that, okay? So just at the top corner you'll see two arrows. Tap that and everything will come back. Okay, so I'm gonna long press on the brush. Okay now the chances are, okay, you might come out to something like this which says Libraries, okay? Or you might to begin with just start off with something like this. Okay so these will be the default brushes that you get inside of Photoshop Sketch. At the top right you've got the option to add. That will take you out to Capture and you being that process form there. And at the top left, you've got an arrow pointing to the left, okay and this is where you can choose from your Creative Cloud libraries. I'm gonna go to Mobile Magic just here and it's just updating that library so you can see what the different brushes I've got in here so there's a few, Scratchy and Itchy, don't want to invade anybody else's IB there. And a Point Break and Teri Hatcher, just there and Hatching Brush of course. And there's Jaime just there so let's draw with Jamie for a bit so it's drawing with Jaime (laughing). So we'll just doodle. I'm just gonna doodle here. I'm gonna go all Jon Burgerman on myself. Can you see that? Look at that, wow, wacky stroke that is. That's more of a, that's not so much of a sketching brush, that's a delineating brush. Look at that. Yeah so if you're drawing with that, that is definitely one because it's actually analyzing my stroke there and conforming the brush to it. So that's really good. That's sort of smoothing that out nicely. Let's go for a wacky kind of shape. There and I'm gonna tail that up. Great thing with a wobbly thing like this is that it's very hard to tell when you went off, sort of off trajectory with it really 'cause it's jut gonna conform and actually make it more attractive that way. This is gonna be a mean cactus I think. Gonna go cactusy with it. Yup, so something like that. That we can bring that in there. If we're gonna go cactus, let's go full cactus. There we are. So bring in a few lines like that. Let's try out the other brush. So if we try out the Tofu-based brush, I'm gonna long press just there, do a bit of scribbling with that. So there you go, it's got an interesting texture there. I'm pressing harder now and you can see how that texture is coming through. Again I'm not trying to make a finished piece of artwork here. I'm trying to demonstrate the variability of the brush that you can build yet in just minutes to use on your own stuff. So you can see that's got great pressure variation. Let's try maxing up the size of it a little bit. Whoa, that's quite a nice texture. That's a bit, reminds me of a plant, that thing. I wonder what that would look like with some color? Let's pick some color. If I got to my color picker here, I'm gonna go to my color wheel. Let's bring that around and change those. I'm choosing a hue and a saturation value there. Now I'm choosing a brightness value just here. I don't want to go too hot on that because the poor people who have to edit this afterwards have got to try and unpick it and get it so (laughing) so it's a bit more friendly for screens. I'm gonna change the opacity. And something else I'm gonna do is tap on the options down at the bottom here, okay, for the different variations I've got there. And so I've got lots and lots of dynamics here. Different brushes have different ranges of dynamics. You can see their controllers if they have any of them are in this region down here, okay? You can see I can vary the scatterings. I even post creating that brush. It's still there as a variable component. I can change the blending mode, okay? So maybe if I go to something like multiply, I think like this, it needs to be a fairly dark color to work with multiply, okay? But if I draw like that and then start to build that up, let's draw something over here, right? You can see how that's getting darker just there and if I tap again, gonna choose a complimentary color to green which is sort of towards magenta just there and just pull over that, you can see how those things are merging together with that multiply blend mode, okay? And there's so much more you can do that. Okay, so what I ought to do really is now we tested out those two brushes is go back into the cat that I had going on earlier on which is just here with my other cooky cats. And I think a long press just there. The brush is a per document, they don't carry across into the application as such. They carry across into a project and a project is a collection of different drawings, okay? So when I move out of this and you see or come into it and you see a group of drawings just there, that's a project. This is a sketch inside of a project.

Class Description

Adobe's mobile drawing tools are amazing! If you combine them together and with the other mobile tools, they're AWESOME! In Adobe® Mobile Drawing Techniques Tony Harmer will show you how to get started, along with a bunch of tips and tricks.

You’ll Learn:

  • To discover mobile drawing on phones and tablets
  • How to combine apps to achieve the results you want
  • How to make valuable assets using your devices

Don’t be Intimidated by the range of available drawing tools, In Adobe Mobile Drawing Techniques Tony will take you through the best software, tools, and methods to create amazing illustrations to use in your professional designs. 


SOFTWARE USED:

Adobe Illustrator Draw 2018, Adobe Capture CC 2018


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