Advanced Drum Production

Lesson 45 of 52

Bonus: EZDrummer - Mixing in Your DAW

 

Advanced Drum Production

Lesson 45 of 52

Bonus: EZDrummer - Mixing in Your DAW

 

Lesson Info

Bonus: EZDrummer - Mixing in Your DAW

Mixing in your dog okay, so basically this topic right here is a can of worms in a way that it's super complicated there's absolutely no way that I can show you guys how to do this in on our in fifteen minutes or even in a week. This is something that people spend their entire careers getting good at, so you're not going to learn how teo e q a drum set to perfection in this so please don't be expecting that what you will get is what to do if the easy mix mixer is just not enough for you and you want to expand your tonal options with easy drummer because that's what I do and that's what a lot of other people do who use it to a professional capacity so that said, getting pro tools going I've got a song thing that we kind of looked at earlier and uh I am going to get rid of everything that has anything to do with mix on it so see you later you guys see you later been real alright, everything worked according to plan we should have easy drummer just coming down to track stereo like from th...

e womb this's how to how easy drummer originally was in we'll play in your dog when you loaded it so you can hear it's all coming down to stereo channel it's just one that's all there is that and you could get away with putting something like easy mixed to drum bus on that channel and it does sound pretty cool but that's not what we're going to get into we're gettinto how to take this further but one thing that I should note is this already sounds pretty good this is just the rock exclamation point sample pack and this is with nothing on it this is raw sounds pretty good one thing like I said earlier about easy mix I mean easy drummer that's cool is that the samples are already queued and compressed so you don't really need to spend a lot of time mixing you can if you want but there's not very far to go as opposed to superior germer were things of raw and you have complete control over everything as you can hear this is just good out the gate that said you still might want to take it that last fifteen percent or you just wanna have individual control over the elements this top it also is where the expansion packs come in so for instance right now we are in this rock easy x but what we want to use metal machine doesn't necessarily sound batter wrong is a matter of taste but the first step to getting a good mix is selecting the right drum set and this is the same as when we record real drums I mean we spend forever picking the drums before we record a single beat we spend for ever frankenstein ing our kids it's not just set up and go and ah, so this process right here where you can pick which drums on which kit this is very much like what? What happens in real life all these different symbols you khun change out, and so we do it the studio with real drums, this no different and we spent a long time on that, so to really get the drum set to where you want, you might need to spend a long time on this now granted easy drummer already has a samples, acute and compressed and awesome ized, so you're not going to need to spend a crazy amount of time on it, but the selection process is not always that quick. So say you have your song like we do right here. I already decided what kid I like, but the process of getting their entails something like this you hit play and then you scroll through the kits once you've scrolled through the kids and you find something you kind of like, then you scroll through individual drums and boom, you're there! So honestly, I kind of like that, but I don't think it's perfect for it it's, a metal kitt geared towards faster music, so the sounds are bigas would want for something rock so definitely would be picking one of the rockets and just so you can hear, I'll play the classic, which is actually meant for more like indie music or classic rocker stuff like that, letting it load, but just tio again let you hear what it sounds like with a completely different kit. This is step one, I mean, obviously I'm not going to use that is totally inappropriate for for this piece of music, so I mean, it would be great if I was doing something else, but just not for this, um, something go back to rock now within this once you pick your kit, then you have tio well, once you pick your sample said, then you get to pick individual elements and it makes a difference. I was just a different kick and that's so much more thought. One thing I should note is I was doing this without the music on for the benefit of you guys out there in internet land, but in general, you kind of want to do this with the music playing because you're not going to know what's, what without the context of the music, this is all about context, you are doing drums in a vacuum don't be surprised if you get some music on them and they don't sound right, so I mean, if you're looking teo I heard of him coming from over there if you need to fix a problem oh, why? Ah anyways, if you need to fix a problem like ah snare that's ringing really weird yes, by all means solo it and when you're doing certain things soloing is great it's got its place otherwise there wouldn't be a solo button, but the most important thing about a mix is that everything works well together and there's no way to make everything work well together without listening everything together. So those of you that spend nine hours on a solo doubts snare drum you're wasting your time and burning your ears out so wait selected that kick the one that I liked when it was sold out it does actually seem to work well with the music, so that's kind of cool and so I'm going to go with that punches well has got a nice thud and ah, we'll see what's up with snare I already like what's on hearing us who have a better option just for the sake of argh. One thing I did one thing I didn't say is make a loop, so to be perfectly honest I'm torn between that one and the one I originally had but this ring is in there kind of punches through a little more so I was going to go with that first, I'm gonna check that it works in the other sections two and that's something you guys should check, especially those of you in metal land who have tons of blast beats and then break down blast and then a breakdown you to make sure that your snares work fast and slow and they work when there's eighteen hundred stare heads next together, and then also when there's not very many snare hits next together, so you had toe look again context. The entire song is a hole just because something sounds good on a blast, pete doesn't mean that's going to sound good on a breakdown, so, you know, find something that works for everything and that's why this selection process could take a little longer than you might think. Ah ah, now that I heard it, I heard it like every riff I'm going back to my original snare, I think it works better as a team or mexico, which is a word what I was doing, but I was just checking was that the snare made sense and all the parts and it wasn't just awkward, like when the tom park came in seems to work, so I think the kid's cool toe good to go so let's talk about busing now you can use the easy drummer mixer. I want to ask you a question. Sure, what's up. Ivan wanted to know if you ever use different snare samples for different song sections, like one snare for blast beats in a different one. For breakdowns, wei will have hugh means and like on real albums. Yeah, but not like the drums will completely change from one section to the next, like it's, a completely different trumps it's. Not like that it's, just like you'll bring in more samples to achieve a certain tone. But there's always the the underlying basic snare sound that stays the same. Just you know, you might want it a little fatter on a breakdown, so you bring in some fatter snares and lay them underneath, or what? Whatever, in my one more ring on the blast pieces sounds war just to clarify for every home that's, uh, that's, pretty advanced stuff that I think you'll be covering in your upcoming advanced from absolutely. But yes, the answer is yes.

Class Description

Recording drums that sound both hyper-polished and authentic has always been something of a black art — one that isn't taught at any school, one that you could only learn from one of the few elite engineers scattered across the planet. Until now.

In this three-day class, free to watch while live, you'll learn the real-world production techniques that producer Eyal Levi uses every day at Audiohammer Studios — on albums for bands like The Black Dahlia Murder, August Burns Red, Chelsea Grin, and Whitechapel. Eyal will show how to select the right drums for the sound you want, tune and set them up, and mic the kit. Oh, and did we mention that the legendary Sean Reinert (Cynic, Death) is the in-studio drummer?!

You'll also learn how to use virtual drums, including when to use Toontrack's Superior Drummer and other software instead of a human drummer. Finally, Eyal will reveal the closely-kept secrets for polishing tracks —everything from editing and sample replacement to layering samples. At the end of this class, you'll know the trade secrets of high-end drum production and be armed with a toolkit for creating world-class drum tracks.

Lessons

  1. Class Introduction
  2. The Tone Pie and Process Overview
  3. Getting the Lay of the Land and Q&A
  4. Assemble Your Gear
  5. Drum Tuning Part 1
  6. Drum Tuning Part 2
  7. Fine Tuning Tones Part 1
  8. Fine Tuning Tones Part 2
  9. General Guidelines of Tracking Drums
  10. Tracking with Sean Reinert
  11. Pop Quiz
  12. Basics of Superior Drummer
  13. EZDrummer vs Superior Drummer
  14. Constructing a Metal Drum Kit Part 1
  15. Constructing a Metal Drum Kit Part 2
  16. Constructing a Rock Drum Kit
  17. Grooves and Programming
  18. General Q&A
  19. Prepping Virtual Drums for the Mix
  20. Superior Review with Q&A
  21. Intro to Mixing and Drum Clean Up
  22. Interview with John Douglass
  23. Intro to Drum Editing
  24. Manual Editing Approach
  25. Editing with Beat Detective
  26. Editing with Elastic Audio
  27. Sample Layering
  28. Replacements
  29. Gain Staging and Bussing
  30. Mixing Essentials
  31. Compression and Parallel Compression
  32. Reverb and Automation
  33. Mixing Tips and Tricks
  1. Bonus: EZDrummer - Introduction
  2. Bonus: EZDrummer - Intro to EZDrummer
  3. Bonus: EZDrummer - EZDrummer Foundations
  4. Bonus: EZDrummer - How a Drummer Plays
  5. Bonus: EZDrummer - Part Writing Part 1
  6. Bonus: EZDrummer - Part Writing Part 2
  7. Bonus: EZDrummer - Part Writing Q&A
  8. Bonus: EZDrummer - Intro to Grooves
  9. Bonus: EZDrummer - Writing from Scratch
  10. Bonus: EZDrummer - Intro to Fills
  11. Bonus: EZDrummer - Writing Fills
  12. Bonus: EZDrummer - Mixing in Your DAW
  13. Bonus: EZDrummer - Bussing and EQ
  14. Bonus: EZDrummer - Compression and Reverb
  15. Bonus: EZDrummer - Conclusion with Q&A
  16. Bonus Video: Editing
  17. Bonus Video: Toms and Cymbals
  18. Bonus Video: Snare Midi
  19. Bonus Video: Kick Midi

Reviews

Michael Nolasco
 

To the guy that said buyer beware: this is an advanced production class, it's not meant for beginners who are learning to mic up a kit. I'm a beginner, but i'm using superior drummer, so this class was perfect for me to learn how to process drums post recording. I refer to it constantly. The editing videos are also prime information.