Anatomy of a Photoshoot

Lesson 24 of 38

Q&A

 

Anatomy of a Photoshoot

Lesson 24 of 38

Q&A

 

Lesson Info

Q&A

Art mines had asked who issues the pole letter who issues it yeah aaron issues it was a quick answer mark it has the studio logo on it or typically if you're shooting for a magazine it actually comes it's a letter long letterhead from the publication because they can guarantee this is where actually running this she's really doing this for us so it just depends on who owns the shoot or if I'm doing it personally than contract it would be right me personally with my insurance and credit card thank you see uh question iss from judy practical question do you take credit cards checks or how do you accept payment? Oh so great question uh we accept checks um very common and we take credit cards through people so we use paypal's ap I for your developers to accept payments and then we're also looking at cube you seen you square square so square square cubes the car right? Yeah yeah square for workshops something he also didn't mention with the model is that we agreed to their payment ahead of ...

time the amount that they're paid it doesn't have decided at the end of the shoot it's signed upon and agreed upon it ahead of time yes and actually working with the model is something that I forgot I don't know if it's part of the pdf download booking agreement yes it is yeah I skipped it but when we have a model coming to shoot we have a booking agreement that booking agreement says javier or you're the model and you were going to pay you six dollars you're going to be here wearing jeans and a cool t shirt you'll be on set at studio a at this location from this time to this time you will be working with x y z and we expect you to behave in this manner and please do this and that etcetera do you agree to this yes or no and then you have to actually physically respond to that to accept the job yes um and that allows us to make sure that you have told us that you understand what we want you to do and there are no misconceptions and so that shoot agreement is actually printed and then at the end when we're paying the model and we have the the release and I hand them a cheque usually I do hand check I have the agreement that they signed so if they get a check for six dollars they go wait a second I was supposed to be paid ten we can say no this is what you signed this is what you agreed to we went over this we've never had an issue there well yes we have we've had issues that's why we have the booking agreement way hadn't spectacular failure at the dvd shoot that's right we did we had a huge problem and that's why we waited that yes that's a good story for later a question from clear of r a have you ever had a model refused to sign a release after you've done the shot and what do you do about that? We've never had that happen um no, we never had that happen so we don't work with models that are just that aren't models so a model that's an actual model knows that's part of the industry and that's part of business and so you want to deal with that if you work with somebody that may be an acquaintance from down the street that's never modeled and it's just somebody that you met you know that you think wow, you could be a model you're probably gonna have issues with that so um and that's why you go over it ahead of time yes before you educate first yes. Now no surprises that's the theme no surprises ever for model client p anybody no surprises question from twilight fairy is who on the team handles finances, salaries, taxes, etcetera we do and r c p a who we love very much. Yeah um these guys have very limited involvement in money. Kelsey probably has the most involvement of these guys and so she's doing things like handling dvd sales uh estimates estimates that's about it yeah, so they're insulated for many reasons they're sort of a firewall between us and them not that were us in them, but we are we own they work, and so we want to make sure that, uh, that we're making sure they understand where the business is from a financial standpoint for security purposes, but we don't share everything, um, because that's it's probably not good business to do that question from double track. When do you deliver the photos to the client? Right after the session has done or a few days later a couple weeks when they pay in full month? Yes, they don't get the pictures until they're paid well, so how long it takes? Depends so let's say, uh, michael, back in his old life, they would pay in full at the end of the shoot, and we would say, here your files because they had an art department that was going to do everything and they expected to have them right away and their own timelines. But let's say it was a different client that didn't have an art department and we were expected to do all the postproduction. What we do is we've already taken at least fifty percent of a deposit in all production costs, so we know we're not losing money when we do the postproduction we do all the post production in a timely manner, something that we've agreed upon in advance, we've told them we're gonna take a week or two weeks or whatever it is, um, that depends on the complexity of the shoot, and then we say, okay, your photos are ready, and once they pay us, they get all of their assets, but we never give assets without being paid because we have been burned almost every time if we don't get paid first. Unfortunately, a question from anthony and the question from sorry. Best yes, all releases if I'm setting up a photo booth or studio booth and I'm taking everybody's pictures and the bride knows everything's gonna be upon a storefront website for people to buy, and I've got my business cards and I don't have anything for them to sign, and people drink too much and they get the pictures, photographs and then they see there on the web and they didn't sign anything. And what kind of issues could I run into big issues? Yeah, um, you shouldn't can't can't ever publish photos without permission, and so I mean, do you answer this, too? Because I shot weddings? My rule of thumb is, don't I dont public put up anything from a wedding that might embarrass somebody, so if you know weddings, people know that they expect to have a gallery where they conceal the pictures and buy them. So wedding is a different situation from a commercial shoot. I didn't hear the wedding party. Sorry, yeah, the weddings are different. Um, but I still, just because you shot it, doesn't mean it has to go up there. So if there's something that somebody might regret or somebody could something's boss could see it later. You don't know who these guests are, how they're gonna have edited those out. Yeah, so, yes, so I tend to put up non incriminating, yeah, waiting that's coming from your chutes. Wow, that's, pretty crazy.

Class Description

Join Mark Wallace as he dissects a commercial photoshoot to reveal each step at its most basic level. From technical aspects of lighting and color, to real-world experiences working with art directors, make-up artists, models, and other professionals, you’ll have a firsthand look as he puts each piece together to complete several complete concepts from start to finish. This unique course explores the fundamentals of commercial photography, from the smallest jobs to the biggest productions. Bring your questions from your own shoots, or use this experience as a roadmap when planning your first jobs. Mark will be chatting with the live worldwide audience throughout the weekend!


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CS 5.1

Reviews

Sean
 

Mark really knows his stuff. He was very well prepared and Mark did a great job teaching this course. Mark went through all the steps from beginning to end in great detail. He also answered questions from the audience an online viewers which helped fill in any blanks. Great course.