The Art of Filmmaking and Editing

 

Lesson Info

Building the Film Continued

Okay, so whenever you take a break, of course editing, I recommend doing long sessions. Sorta like poker, that's probably why I can do it. You want to take breaks every hour or two, I would say is probably, you know your body better than I do. But every hour or two, I get up, I walk around, do some push-ups. Maybe watch an episode of Boardwalk Empire, maybe not. Get off my arm. You must not take very many breaks. Psh, please. Please. We can have a conflict later. But when you come back from a break, watch what you've done to make sure you're not crazy. So let's do that and make sure we're not crazy. Sorry, I'm 42 seconds late. There was traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart-rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you traveled by boat? Briefly. Do you mind telling me what this meeting's about? Do you mind telling me what that's all about? Aw, my movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Excuse me, my movie. Yeah no, that's clearly me. See, Kevin, with a K, Kubota, with a ...

K. Okay, that wasn't supposed to happen, obviously. So that clip is actually slowing us down big time. Yeah, that's the one. Yeah, it's cause it's different resolution. It's okay. So let's. Is that okay with a K? Very funny. Let's keep going here. I'm actually gonna get rid of it for right now. And we'll bring it back in later. So I'm gonna get rid of that just so it doesn't slow us down. And if it doesn't end up working out, we have the raw footage in a hard drive over there that we can grab. Okay so one thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna get rid of this transition, I'm gonna bring this over here, and I'm going to watch this back. Wait, what have I done here? Greatest human be-- That's what we wanted to get rid of. Okay so, we watched it back. Everything looks good. I'm going to make a couple changes, obviously, when we go forward but we want to keep moving forward with this process here. So what's the next line here that happens? Come on, computer. Let's do it. Jeff your PC is infecting my Mac, can you move it over a little bit? Is that the problem? It's totally destroying it here. All right, now we've got that. Kubota, with a K. No, I. I actually deleted the wrong clip there, is the problem. I'm gonna get rid of that, I'm gonna get rid of that. Now I'm gonna, okay so here's a good lesson right here. Whenever you have a gap in your timeline here, you want to close the gap, as we like to call it. You don't actually have to drag everything, you just go into the negative space and click ripple delete and everything's gonna move over. So that's a very easy way to close gaps there. So let's find out what that is. Kubota, with a K. So we have to actually get him to say the line here. I want to see what he ends up saying here. With a K. Okay. So let's move this over. Press alt, drag this closer. Kubota, with a K See, that's where you're confused. Because that's me on the cover, Action Man, with an A. No, I think you're the one that's confused because that is clearly me, see? All right so one thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna put a little L cut in here just so this isn't choppy. Kubota, with a K. And going to alt drag this over a little bit. See, Kevin, with a K. Kubota, with a K. See, that's where you're confused because that's me on the cover, Action Man, with an A. No, I think you're the one that's confused because that is clearly me, you see? All right, so let's find out what's next in our script. I think you're the one who's confused, holding the DVD up to his face for comparison. You're kidding, that doesn't even look like you. Bone structure, cheek bones, that's me. All right, so let's find. Let's go to our... I say we go to our medium shot here of the profile and we're gonna possibly consider going back to the wide shot for later on. I don't know what the heck is going, there we go. My computer is struggling here. Excuse me, my movie. Yeah, see, that's me. Kevin, with a K. Kubota with a K. Yeah, I think that's where you're confused because that's me, Action Man, with an A. Gonna go to core quality. Why are you making that face? What is the next line here? You're kidding right, that doesn't even look like me. The bone structure, okay. I think you're the one who's confused because this is me. Are you kidding me, it doesn't even look like you, the bones, look at the bones, the bones. That's me, that's clearly me. All right, I like it. It's a little hyena-ish. No offense, Kevin. So we're gonna maybe find something a little less hyena-like. But I want to get a shot of Kevin's reaction to what he's saying, is probably more important than that because, of course, for the obvious reasons it is him. It's me. Are you kidding me? It doesn't even look like you. The bones, look at the bones, the bones. That's me, that's clearly me. (laughing) I want to see what the close up looks like, and then I want to see what the wide shot looks like. I only leave my-- Making a face-- I think you're the one who's confused 'cause this is me. Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? That doesn't look anything like you. Bones, bones, the cheek bones. Look, that's me. Better, better. I would prefer not to use a closeup on this shot because we don't want our closeups to lose impact but if we have to, acting, in my opinion, trumps shot selection, for me. If you ask 100 people you're probably gonna get 100 different answers. But for me, what's actually happening in the clip will always trump the shot selection. I think you're the one who's confused 'cause this is me. Are you kidding? This is me. All righty, so let's bring this down. So will you explain what you were doing with the arrows there? I was just going back to find my ideal end point for my frame. Now I'm gonna look at the wide shot 'cause this could be a good time to remind our viewers that they are sitting at the table together. Yeah, gotcha. So, I'm Kevin Kubota, greatest human being that's ever lived. I see where you're confused, but that's actually me, Action Man with an A. Why are you looking at me like that? I think you're the one who's confused because see this is me. Are you kidding me, that doesn't even look like you! Kidding me, that doesn't even look like you! The bones, the bone structure. See, that's me! Is there a point to this meeting? Okay, I'm gonna go with the wide shot. And the reason why is 'cause at this point we might wanna remind our viewer of the irony of the moment. That's not you. It's clearly me, the bone structure, the bones, it doesn't make sense. Having them both on the screen simultaneously makes it a little funnier because it's clearly him, both shots. So, let's find a good reaction shot, and we wanna have Kevin say his next line there, as well. Let's go up here. No, I think you're the one that's confused because this is clearly me. See? You're kidding, right? That doesn't even look like you. The bone structure is nowhere near correct. What's the point of this meeting? And also, another reason why we wanna use the wide shot is the fact that he throws the DVD back down on the table. Establishes that the DVD is now back on the table so we don't have to worry about where that is in the position of the frame. So, let's put this shot together here. Now, since we've done it one time already, we can copy and paste the attributes of what's happening. And I'm gonna show you how to do that, I just wanna line everything up first. Me, see? Kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bone, the bone. Like you. The bone structure is nowhere near correct. So we're gonna have a continuity issue because he's holding that DVD up right there. So, we're gonna have to L cut that in. So, let's go right here. I'm gonna bring this up one, I'm moving everything up a track so that I can move this video clip right here over top of his next line. Kidding me? It doesn't. Kidding me? It doesn't even look like you. The bone, the bone structure. See, that's me. Okay, let's move this out, let's bring this down. What's the point of this meeting? Moved this over. Now, I'm going to have to move all those up again one more track because we need two tracks there. So, I'm gonna-- You're moving just the video, correct? I'm using just the video, yes. I'm not moving the audio. And you can do that so you can place these on top of each other? Yep. So, I'm going to drag these down together. Now, a lot of times what I'll do to make sure an edit is working, I'll play it to hear it. So, I wanna make sure that the timing makes sense. So, a lot of times, I'll play it and just look away to make sure the timing makes sense and I'm not worried about the visual cut. Are you kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bones. So you see how the continuity is messed up right there? I'm not worried about that, yet, but I'm gonna make that work. So, that's actually, I'm not gonna take full credit for that continuity being pretty flawless when we get it right. But I'll take 80%, 85% of the credit. You can have five and we'll give Kevin 10. Sure. All right. Write the checks. Kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bone. So you see that that all, you see where the cut point has to be. So all I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna play this one more time to see. It's all that dead air. So wait, which-- Kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bone. Hmm. The close up is this one on top here? 95? Yes. And then the wide shot is the one directly below it? Yes. Gonna drag this here. Are you kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bones, the bone structure. See, that's-- Does everyone see how it's working now? And okay, so, let's make sure the audio sounds good. Because that is clearly me. See? Are you kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bones, the bone structure. See? That's me. All righty, now, when we did our crop, did we crop Kevin's shot? Yeah. This is our original cropped shot right here from the beginning. I'm just gonna right click, I'm gonna copy, then I'm gonna go right here and I'm gonna right click and I'm gonna go paste attributes. And boom, automatic. So, if you have an effect that repeats throughout the course of the film, you can just paste the attributes right on top of it, and you can do the same thing with removing attributes, as well. Ross is the genius, but I have to say, after sitting behind him for about six months watching him go and reapply effects, I'm like dude, there's gotta be a way to just copy the attributes or something, like right click, right click. And he right-clicked and it was right there. It was like paste attributes. I'm like I told you! I tend to ignore shortcuts and things of that nature. And it just kinda proves my point that it doesn't really, these shortcuts and all, the long way, short way, it doesn't matter. It's just about the idea and getting to the finish line and I always say, you could invent an editing program right now and hand it to me, and we could put this film in there, and it'll end up being the same. We would just need to add an extra day for the class for me to get through it. But the only thing that would change is the time. So, let's see how that ended up working. No, I think that you're the one that's confused. Because that is clearly me. See? Are you kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bones, the bone structure. See, that's me. What's the point of this meeting? Now, we're gonna go into the medium shot of Kevin in a profile. We're wide, we're gonna work our way back in. So let's find Kevin medium right here. Kevin or Action Man? Action Man, I'm sorry. Well, it's Kevin. I only need my. It's me, it's clearly me. Is there a point to this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. I gotta visit from a girl. Her name's Alison. Know who I'm talkin' about? Now, that's a long line to look at Kevin that entire time. So, we're gonna put some reaction shots of the real Kevin interspersed with that. So let's get that down here. And then we're gonna find, and the best way to do that, the quickest way to do that, and remember, this is a rough cut, so we're trying to be efficient. The best way to do that is find Kevin's next line, the shot you're gonna use, and then take reactions shots from that. So Ross, I have exactly the same thought you did that well, this is a long time to just kinda watch him say that and we need to somehow break that up. You have a rule of thumb for that? Or anyway you could let the audience know how they can, is it just based on feel, the pace? Or do you have a rule of thumb? It's not a rule of thumb. It is based on pace. But if you get good at reading, the timeline is like a music sheet. You can read it, and it should have some sort of rhythm to it. Look at it. What's the longest clip on that timeline? The very first. The one at the end. The one at the end, actually, is the longest one. The very first one is our establishing shot, so it's meant to be long. So, aside from that, the longest clip is the one at the very end. That's clearly off pattern, so we need to break that up a little bit. That's not how I tell, but it's a very good indicator. It's the first time I've heard you use that one. It's like a music sheet-- I just invented it right now. Really? Yeah. That's impressive. I know. That's make the Twitter quotes at some point. I'll be doing private lessons later in the lunch room. On a piano? On a piano. Reaction shots. What's the best shot we use for a reaction shot? Anybody? The close up shot. Close ups, yes. Close ups, very good. So, we have this here, and what is his line? (laughing) Glad you asked. By the way, if you freeze frame any video clip, it's always awkward. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. I got a visit-- So that break in his dialogue would be where the first reaction goes. From a girl. And then once he says from a girl, we'll actually go to Kevin and let him answer. Those are how to add the art. And action. So I show her I know it's on this DVD. So, this reaction has nothing to do with this shot but I'm gonna use it just to, Internet question came in about using reactions that don't fit. Well, here, we're gonna do it right now. Rolling and action. So I show her, I know it's on this DVD. Explain how that happened. Although it doesn't really fit, but let's see. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. And the ideal cut point there is going to be when he looks off camera. Now, you're looking just for the reaction, which is why you just deleted the audio beneath it. Correct? Yes, yes. The audio is irrelevant for that shot. Now, when do I use the reaction? Well, we determined that it was in this gap of space here. But look at where he looks. Let the character tell you when to use the reaction. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. Soon as he looks back (slapping), show Kevin. So it's like it's you're in that character's mind for a second. Cabin if it's really important. I got a visit from a girl. It works. I like it until he starts to shake his head. Yes, me too. It's too long anyway. But yes. I got a visit. That's yep. Perfect. My cabin if it's really important. I got a visit from a girl. That's great. Her name's Alison. So now we need to find a shot of Kevin. Let's go, nah, not wide-- Does everybody agree that that really helps the pace of the film? Mm-hmm. What's your point? I'm glad you asked because I don't come out of hiding unless there's a good reason. I was visited by a girl, Alison. (laughing) You know her? I do. Okay, so we find the I do. Alison. You know her? I do. Okay, so, we bring that up and then we just hold alt and drag the video here, and now watch it. I'll make this full screen for everybody at home to see. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. I got a visit from a girl. Her name's Alison. You know who I'm talking about? I do. Nice. So that works. One thing I did notice is the continuity of Action Man going from here to here. Let's just make sure. Yes, I'm glad you asked. See that? His hands are up and then they're down in the original shot. They're up, they're down. Did anyone not notice that? I didn't notice it until you just replayed it. Yeah, so that's kind proves continuity on a first look sometimes goes overlooked. So we need to fix that. Bone, the bone structure. See, that's me. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. So the way I'm gonna fix that is by going into Kevin on the other side. What's the point of this meeting? And I'm gonna find a shot where he's putting down the DVD on the medium shot. So we're wide, we're gonna go medium. What about where you're looking over my shoulder, with the shirt on? That's what I'm doing. Yeah. Yeah. And then, I'll probably get rid of the close up that's in the middle here, maybe, depending on how the pace of this looks. So let's get here. Not sure why that keeps happening to me. Is it hot? It's running. It's running, it's hot. Ah, my movie. How to Photoshop Everyone. Excuse me, my movie. Uh, yeah, no. That's clearly me, Kevin with a K. Kubota with a K. I see where you're confused. That's me, Action Man, with an A. No, I think you're the one that's confused because that is clearly me. You're kidding, right? It doesn't even look like you. The bone, cheeks, the bone, look at those cheeks. That's me. Yeah, is there. All right, so the problem with that is he's talking when he says it, let's see. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I. What's the point of this meeting. Yes, I'm glad you asked. So, a good way to find out if your continuity is working, since the source screen and the playback screen are side by side, playback screen on the right, source screen on the left, you can put your toggle right at your cut point and that's the frame you're trying to match. This meeting. (mumbling) Well, I'm glad you asked, because you know I don't come out of hiding. So, let's bring this down. Again, audio is irrelevant so I'm gonna hold alt, get rid of it, hold alt, get rid of it, and then I'm gonna bring this over here, and let's just see. This probably won't work yet, but we'll get it to work. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. (dinging) I only leave my cabin-- But then I'm not moving. The point of this meeting. Yes, I'm glad you asked. I only leave my cabin. That's not gonna be an issue because, though Jeff just made a good point. So, this is where, depends on how crazy you are about continuity. Jeff's not moving, aka Action Man's shoulder, is not moving when we make this cut right here. To that. But, the focus, the focal point of this shot is on Kevin. So, eight out of 10 people are not gonna notice it. And how I justify it is well, Forrest Gump has continuity flaws, so Action Man's gonna have some continuity flaws. (laughing) That quote should make Twitter. By the way, I've figured out why this is giving you issues. You took that original Chef Tony clip from a two-and-a-half hour clip. Yeah? And so any time it's having to reference that, it has to deal with that entire six gig file. So, if you'll just take that out of the bin, then it shouldn't be giving you a problem anymore. Okay. Ask and you shall receive. Let's take a question while we're waiting for the spinny wheel of death to catch up with life. If you exported just that section, it won't give you-- We have a question that's kind of stepping back a few steps, but I think it would be beneficial for a few people in the chat room. Can you go through your workflow again? Just kind of in an overarching outline-ish sort of way? That's not even a word. Forgive me. And outlined way of how you download, back up, organizing, all of that. If that's possible to be brief. Yeah, I download the footage. I rename the folder on the card so that it registers in the camera that is has no image. I immediately backup the files. So I put 'em, I have a work hard drive where I always put whatever I'm working on on that hard drive, and it's about 500 gigs, so I just, that's a temporary. I move 'em off and on. And I put 'em where I wanna save 'em forever, and then I import them into Premier, I log all the footage depending on how big the project is, and I begin editing. I'd also like to talk about the card for just a second. We said that it's a good fail safe way to know that you've downloaded the card. But let's say for some reason you went and you renamed it but you never downloaded, and then you put it in your camera. Well, you can shooting again, but it won't overwrite what's there, it'll only use as much space as remains on the card, so all your original footage is there. If you fill up that card, all you've done is fill up the remaining space and all the original footage is still there. This cutting way back, but what size SD cards do you guys usually bring with you? We do Compact Flash and we have 32 gigs. Compact Flash, 32. I wanna make a point about something Jeff mentioned that the continuity was off here. This is not something I recommend doing, but in a wedding or an event or a live situation where the continuity's always going to be off and it's almost just irrelevant, something you could do here. Remember the candle? Mm-hmm. I could just cut to the candle right here. Then continuity would not even matter here. And of course, it's gonna destroy the flow of our film, which is why I would never do it. But in a live event, you can do this all the time. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. Doesn't even make any sense, right? But you can do it. Just point that out. Do you like the shot of the candle, Jeff? I do but I like that he's right. In our event films, he does that constantly to get you from one place to the next. Like if I wanna cut from the wide of the bride and groom to a medium shot of them standing at the altar, and the continuity doesn't match, I'm so converse, I'm so trained to do continuity that I won't make that cut. I'll actually cut to a shot of an audience member and then come back in on the medium shot. And you don't have to do that. Those films are very forgiving. People aren't expecting to see continuity, but I can't help myself. So that's why during an event, if you actually can find the Expedia film online, and basically it's when the CEO was talking, all the cameras were pointed on him, and then for the rest of the day, all we did was shoot reaction shots from the crowd. And you think it's like one seamless thing, but it's not. Yeah, and he mentioned you can find it online. You can go to our YouTube channel. So it's youtube.com/cinestoriesmpf. That's cinestoriesmpf, for Moving Photography Forward. So, cinestoriesmpf. Okay, so let's keep going here. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. I got a visit from a girl. Her name's Alison. You know who I'm talking about? I do. Okay, so what's the next line here? Got a visit from girl. Alison, you know her? I do. She knocks on my cabin door and tells me to ask her about actions. I'm aware. All right, so she knocks on my cabin door. Tells me to ask her about actions. We had a medium shot of him saying that. So, now, we'll go into a little bit of a closer shot or let's just go to our 2/3 view. So. (coughing) One more time. Is there a point to this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. I don't come outta the woods unless it's really important. I had a visit from a girl. Alison. You know who I'm talking about? I do. She wanted me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. So I show her about actions. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? Okay, so something's that gonna happen here that's gonna be a little interesting is I'm probably, when Kevin says I'm aware, there's no need to show him saying that. So we're just gonna grab the audio for that. And the reason why is because it's, the line is not important. It's so short, and I'd rather just use a good reaction shot of him and hold it longer than show the I'm aware. Now, if the timing is right, and we can get the line and the reaction, then that might work. So, let's find the reaction shot of him saying I'm aware. I thought you travel by. Point to this meeting? I'm glad you asked, because I don't come out of hiding unless there's a good reason. I was visit by a girl, Alison. You know her? I do. She knocked on my cabin door and asked me to teach her about actions. Mm-hmm. So I show her and now it's on this DVD. Explain to me how that happened? Well, sure, she wanted to learn about Photoshop, so the coffee shop guy shows her all about. All right, so what we did is we had him actually do the impersonations of each character. We did that in the close up shot, did we not? We did. Guy, he. Explain how that happened? Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So, the coffee shop guy, he shows her about how to automate her workflow, and then the walker, he shows her how to work with the layers, and then the geek, well, he shows her how to fix problems, and then Tony the chef, he shows her how to med the art, I screwed that line. Sorry. Keep going. (laughing) It's okay. Go. That, everyone hear that noise? Mm-hmm. Guys know what that is? That's the crane, that's the crane. Thanks, guys. I just wanna show them how loud, if you think it's not that loud to our ear, but the microphone, it's like a helicopter. I made him do it from the top again. Didn't I? (laughing) Thank you for that. And then Tony, Tony, he shows her how to add the art, and then you, you show her how to automate, how to make actions, and well, it's just good stuff. It was too good to keep to ourselves. We had to make a DVD and share it with the world. It's cool, right? No, it's not cool. I've been in hiding for 50 years. I let one person in my cabin in the middle of the woods, and now, I'm starring in a movie. Co-starring. I'm the star. Technically, you're a supporting role. It's not really important. (laughing) Well, that's what I came here to discuss. I have since-- All right, so now that that has happened, and I've seen that line, I'm saving that shot for that line. I'm going to a little bit of a more medium-like shot. See what he did here. Where? So I show her, and now it's on this DVD. Explain that. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. The coffee shop guy, he shows her how to improve her workflow. The walker, he shows her how to work with the layers. The geek, he shows her how to fix problems. Like little problems. And then Tony, Chef Tony, he shows her how to add the art. And then you. You show her how to do actions. It's great. It's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie and share it with the world. It's cool, right? All right, so obviously, that's way too long. We'll get some reaction shots, and then during the break, we'll export a couple clips from our Photoshop Everyone DVD. And layer it on top of there as some cutaway. Just so everybody knows what was happening. The reason the computer was slowing down is because we have literally the entire two-and-a-half movie exported as one clip. So when we're trying to just take that slice of five seconds that's just too much. It doesn't matter what computer it was on, it's gonna do that. So we're gonna slice that out separately at the break so it won't give us those problems anymore. Wanted me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. So I show her about actions. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So, I'm gonna find the I'm aware line. Let's go here. You know I don't come out of hiding. Mm-hmm. So I show her, and now, it's on the. Hmm. He doesn't say it-- He used it in the one that you were saving for later, he did say it. 'Cause he skipped it a lot of the time. But I think the one he was saying it-- Explain how that happened? Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. It starts too late. I'm gonna cut the I'm aware out, anyway. But I'm not gonna do it until we get our audio lined up. With a K. Kubota with K. Her workflow. Alison, you know her? I do. She knocks on my cabin door, and asks me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. Okay. Actions. I'm awa-- So, I just pressed C on my keyboard, which now has turned my cursor into a razor blade, so when I touch this, boom, it makes a cut. And now I go back-- And we know that it slices the long clip into two separate clips, yes. Parts. I'm aware. I'm gonna do it again, and then I'm gonna go V. Gets me back to my regular cursor. I'm gonna delete that. I'm going to press A. Now, when I press A, my mouse turns into an arrow pointing that way, I'm gonna hold shift when I do this, which puts two arrows down. And then when I click that, it highlights everything there and beyond so I can move it. And I don't have to worry about anything coming undone. Bring this down here. Now, I'm bringing this down on the top layer so I can expand it out, the video, on top here. Here's a thing about Ripple deleting and deleting the gap. If I'm to Ripple delete this, see how it goes underneath right there? You don't want that. So I'm gonna bring the video down here, Ripple delete, and then I'm gonna put it on top. So, let's just listen to the audio. It won't be seamless because we don't have our external audio lined up. She wanted me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. So, I show her about actions. The next thing. Okay, so now I'm gonna hold alt. Find a good cut point here. She wanted me to teach her about actions. I'm gonna drag this out just a little bit here. I'm aware. So, I show here about actions. And then that seems like my ideal cut point to come back in. I'm gonna bring this on top here. Why does that seem like the ideal cut point? Because it's in the middle of his phrase, and there's a dead air cut point there. I'm gonna press alt. So when do you know when to cut on dead air, and when do you know when to cut during a conversation? Just feeling the beat of the conversation. Just experience. I could go. Yeah. Yeah. You feel the flow of the conversation. The cut point most likely will change once we get the audio there, so again, we're just roughing this in. I show her about actions. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So, the coffee shop guy, he shows her how to improve her workflow. The walker, he shows her how-- So this is gonna be a good time to get some good reaction shots of Kevin as Action Man, 'cause I'm sure he made some classic ones during this monologue, so let's see. Her about fixing. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. The coffee shop owner taught her workflow. The day walker showed her about layers. The geek spoke to her about fixing problems. Tony taught her about how to add the art. And you about actions. So we made a-- So we got two good ones there. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So, the coffee shop guy, he. Bringing this right on top. I'm getting rid of the audio completely. 'Cause it doesn't matter. We're using the audio from the clip we're on top of. She wanted to learn about Photoshop. The coffee shop guy, he shows her how to improve her workflow. The walker, he shows her how to work with the layers. The geek, he shows her how to fix problems. Like little problems. And then Tony, Chef Tony, he shows her how to add the art. And then you, you show her how to do actions. It's great, it's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie, and share it with the world. It's cool, right? All right, so, let's talk about some hypotheticals here. This is really long for me. Now, assuming our movie that we have the clips for will work which they will, if we export 'em correctly, for cutaways, we'll make this visually interesting. It might not flow correctly. So, as an editor, sometimes you're going to cut dialogue out that was originally spoken. I'm gonna show you how that works right now because I personally think that this monologue isn't that great. So, let's see how we do that. First thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna move this over. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? It's great, it's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie and share it with the world. It's cool, right? It's great, it's good stuff. So, right there, I'm just gonna make a cut point here. I'm gonna highlight this stuff, I'm get it outta here. And I'm gonna move this over. And this keeps the intensity of the conversation for me. The question is does it make sense in the English language, is really our biggest problem. About actions. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? It's great, it's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie and share it with the world. It's cool, right. So, it kinda works, but we need to get rid of some of initial verbiage. It's great, it's good stuff. How do you explain that? It's good stuff-- Okay, so that would be how I would cut this thing down a lot. And I would never cut, I would never cut to a clip that I cut out dialogue before it. That's when L cut's gonna disguise that for you. It looks choppy right here. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? It's good stuff on there. We had to-- So, I would just hold alt drag this over. Thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? It's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie and share it with the world. It's cool, right? What do you think? Brilliant. Get rid of it? Mm-hmm. Oh yes, absolutely. Yeah. Does everybody agree that that-- Yes. Not that Kevin's not the DiCaprio reincarnation and he can do a monologue very well. You gotta give the guy credit. He is now talking to himself, but the monologue was suffering a little bit there, and if we have those clips, then it might work, but basically, that rationale is we would only keep that monologue so we can show those clips. Which we have to ask ourselves the question we always need to ask ourselves. If we get rid of it, does the story still make sense? And the answer is yes. Now, does the backstory make sense? Which we've discussed. Do people who watch this, will they understand what that means? Maybe, maybe not. But I think more importantly for this situation, it's about the conversation and intensity between these two characters. It'll make sense when we have our ending and we get Kevin to disappear. Well, and the other thing is he does mention all of those characters, but the only three characters in the film are Action Man, him and Chef Tony, and we have another opportunity to kind of establish the movie when he talks about I blew up my cabin. You can cut back to that. So you have a cut back to Chef Tony. You're gonna have a cut back to him blowing up the cabin. That should be enough to kind of establish that there was a movie. Yeah, absolutely. And he obviously has the physical disk there. Actually, I wanna talk about the physical disk. I was actually going to mention this before. There's this thing I like to do in a film, and I didn't realize it until I started, there's a company, a magazine called Resource Magazine that I write articles for sometimes, and I didn't actually realized how often I did this until I wrote the article and I called it The Token. And basically, what the token is is, you see this in a lot of films, it's a lot of importance put on a very small object in the film. Not necessarily a person, but an actual object that's in the film. So, let's talk about some films. Pulp Fiction, what's the token? Briefcase. The Briefcase. Hunger Games, what's the token? Mocking jay pin. The little pin that she wears, right? In our film, what's the token? The DVD. The DVD. And I do this all the time. In a wedding film, what's the token? Cake. The rings. The wedding dress. The ring. Oh, I don't know. Right, so this happens-- Apparently I'm not good at wedding symbolism. (laughing) This happens all the time throughout all of film, all of TV. Anyone watch the show Dexter? Yes. What's the tokens there? Blood slides. The blood slides, right? This is a very common thing. I'm just kinda giving it a random name that I'm giving there but I do it all the time. In Out of Order it's a ring. Actually in my pilot, it's a ring, as well. So, I always do this, and I didn't realize when I was writing it, going back through everything I've done, I've done it every single movie I've ever made. Subconsciously. I didn't even do it on purpose. Now I do it on purpose. But I wanna make that point because you can always find a token in every single film you're making, whether it be a movie, a short film, a commercial, a wedding film, it doesn't matter. There's always some kind of small object that you can put a great deal of importance on and a lot of times it connect characters. And that's why it works so well and is so important. We're you about to ask a question? Yes, so the monologue to me was good. It was the length and it was the pace that kind of disrupted everything. So, if you rewrote that, it broke him up to where he didn't say all three characters and went on and on, it might fit, right? Yeah, when we get the audio in, we can mess with it and start to see, maybe we cut from the wide shot to the close up to the medium and we start to really work that in. And we'll kinda do that separately and see if we can bring it back in. But in the first cut, a lot of times you probably shouldn't cut things out on the first cut, but given our time crunch here, I'm going to, just for the sake of that. But I think, you make a good point. I could make that work, if I sat here long enough. I could easily make it work. Music could change it. A lot of things change it. Audio is gonna really change it. I don't think people understand the importance of this. When we line out this audio, this film is gonna feel like it goes 10 times faster, because this audio's so loud as opposed to something that's very clean and seamless. But yeah, you make a good point. We could make it work, and we'll try it. This DVD! How do you explain that? It's good stuff on there. We had to make a move and share it with the world. It's cool, right. DVD and share it with the world. Pretty cool, huh? No, no, it's not cool! Because I don't know. (laughing) It's not cool! I spent 30, 60. I. Don't know! It's not cool! I spent 30, 60 years in the woods in isolation and the first person I let into my cabin, the next thing you know, I'm starring in a movie! Now, that's a little long, right? It's intense. It's intense. It's well acted. And we know what's coming next. We know the closeup is coming in and it's gonna bounce back and forth, back and forth, and we're gonna draw the intensity into the viewer. So, let's just grab these lines quickly. What do you mean you know the close up is coming? We know this is coming. 'Cause remember we saw that take of him saying co-starring actually. DVD and share it with. Co-starring. For 50 years, I let one person in my cabin in the middle of the woods, and now I'm starring in a movie! Co-starring. I'm the star. Technically, you're a supporting. (laughing) So, let's get that line. And I'm gonna teach you about a beat. Technically, you're a supporting role. It's not really important. So let's get that line and let's get no, I'm the star from Action Man. Star! Well, you're actually a supporting role. But anyway. That's what I wanna talk about. First person I've let into my cabin, the next thing you know, I'm starring in a movie! Co-starring. Gah, I'm the star! Okay, I would prefer a little more casual. Let's see when he says it here. I want you to notice that every time I click into a new click, the cursor goes to where it thinks I am in that timeline, which is kinda cool for Premier. I didn't click anything. No. Action Man. So, it's a little further but it doesn't start at the beginning, so just keep that in mind. Your cursor will always go in all of those clips to where it thinks you are. How so? Actually we were way further. The star! Well, actually, you're a supporting role. I'd rather see his face in this. So, I think we got it here. No, it's not cool! I spend 30, 60 years in the woods in isolation and the first person I let into my cabin, the next thing you know, I'm starring in a movie. Co-starring. So do you wanna do an L cut here? No, this is actually, this is the ideal time for popcorn code-- Why? Because they're sort of arguing. So we wanna draw all the dead air space away from them so that it's almost like they're on top of each other. We're gonna get rid of all the pausing except for the last beat, which is for actually you're the co-star. For the conversation. Or for the reaction shot. Into my cabin, the next thing you now, I'm starring in a movie. Co-starring. Gah, I'm the star! Technically, you're a supporting role. That's not really important. (laughing) So now that he comes out of his point, let's get his purpose for being here. Years, and the first person I let in! Well actually, you're a supporting role. But anyway. (sighing) Line. That's why I came here. Yes, sorry. Well actually, you're the supporting role. But anyway, that's why I came here. (laughing) That was the 30, 40, 60 years. Is that the part? No, you blew up your cabin and you need to-- Yeah, I'll go. Okay. Actually, you're a supporting role. But anyway. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat, and frankly I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. How so? First thing I wanna do right now is I wanna watch the whole thing and just see how the conversation is flowing. So let's do that. (sighing) Sorry, I'm 42 seconds late. There was a traffic, is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you traveled by boat? He, hurts babe. Anyway, you mind telling me what this meeting's about? Do you mind telling me what that's all about? Oh, my movie. How to Photoshop Everyone. Excuse me, my movie. No, that's clearly me. See? Kevin with a K. Kubota with a K. See, that's where you're confused because that's me on the cover, Action Man, with an A. No, I think that you're the one's that's confused because that is clearly me. See? Kidding me? That doesn't even look like you! The bones, the bone structure. See, that's me. What's the point of this meeting? Yes, I'm glad you asked. I only leave my cabin if it's really important. I got a visit from a girl. Her name's Alison. You know who I'm talking about? I do. She wanted me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. So, I show her about actions. The next thing I know, it's on this DVD! How do you explain that? It's good stuff on there. We had to make a movie and share it with the world. It's cool, right? No! It's not cool! I spent 30, 60 years in the woods in isolation and the first person I let into my cabin, the next thing you know, I'm starring in a movie! Co-starring. Gah, I'm the star! Technically, you're a supporting role. That's not really important. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. So we're flowing, we're doing good. Question? Yes. Do you think that the L cuts are less effective when it's the same voice? No, not really. That's actually a good point. No, I don't think they're less effective, because we've established in the beginning that it's clearly him on both sides. When you don't see someone's mouth moving and you hear sound you expect to see where that's coming from. It's a good theory, and it could be. But I don't think it's less effective. And it wouldn't change the way I would edit a dialogue scene. You agree with that? Yes, I do, definitely. Okay. Good. Just making sure you're on board. Making sure I have support. Frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. So let's get a medium shot of Kevin. Or let's say a wider shot of Kevin. The geek, he shows her how to fix problems and then she goes to Chef. The world. It's cool, right? No, it's not cool. I've been in hiding for 50 years. I let one person in that cabin in the middle of the woods, and now I'm starring in a movie. Co-starring. No, I'm in the star. Technically, you're a supporting role, but it's not really important. Well that's what I came here to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin, all the land around it, escaped on a boat, and I need to reintroduce myself to the world. And how are you gonna do that? Okay, so the first thing I see there is Kevin's reaction to him blowing up his cabin. We're gonna have to have that in there. So, let's do this. Hearing it, we hear the story, but there's no emotion to it. So we see Kevin go on like an emotional roller coaster. Gees, this guy's weird. That'll make it a little more impactful. So, let's L cut this, and let's go find some closer versions of the expressions here. I have since blown up my cabin and all the land around it, escaped by boat, and I need to reintroduce myself to the world. So let's... Why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the. Let's get rid of the audio. It doesn't matter, 'cause we're just looking for reaction shots. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. Okay, so first of all, that's too long. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all. A little early. Why I came here. I blew. Important. That's why I came here. I. (laughing) He's psychic. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the wood. (laughing) It's a little early, little early, little early. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin the woods. Still a tad bit early. Came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat. There we go. All right, now let's watch that back. Co-starring. Gah, I'm the star! Technically, you're a supporting role. That's not really important. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. And how are you gonna do that? I want everyone to notice this because continuity really worked there, right? Mm-hmm. Anyone disagree with that? It doesn't. It actually doesn't work. It's actually completely off. His hand movement? Is he not-- His hands. Yeah, his hands are in a different spot. So, his hands right here, there. Oh, his hands. Yeah. And there. Because they're moving. But because they're moving-- It's fine? You don't pay attention to it, and that's the trick to continuity and cutting on an action is just all it needed was a little movement, and again, if somebody's looking and being like wait a minute, let's rewind that. Rewind that. We need to see if those hands match. The story sucks, it's not funny. So, keep that in mind. You can always get away with the continuity flaws. In my boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. And how are you gonna do that? Now that I've pointed it out to you, it's just gonna drive you crazy. But let's pretend I didn't. So, we want to go on the profile for when he says a sequel, because we wanna use that 2/3 shot where he says Action Man, for the Action Man line. So, this little exchange is very similar to the starring and co-starring exchange. It's a back and forth exchange. You're purposely using maybe a less impactful view so that when the more impactful statement is made, you're using the most impactful shot. Essentially, poetically put, I'm putting all my eggs in one basket. There we go. No, I am the star! Yes, sorry. Well, actually you're the-- No, Action Man! To the world. How so? Sequel. I think he says it better than that. Okay, I've blown up my cabin, blown up all the land around it, powered away in my boat, and quite frankly, I think I'm about ready to make a reappearance. How so? Sequel. That's so much better. So I'm gonna get rid of that one, and then I'm gonna go grab Action Man. Now the reason you didn't drag that on top and leave it there is 'cause it was a little, just couple frames smaller than the other one, so which would have meant the other one would've stayed there for those couple of frames, correct? Yes, exactly. But anyway. That's what I wanna talk about. For me to make a reappearance to the world. How so? Sequel. Hmm, part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. No. Action Man. Perfect. (laughing) So now I need to find the sequel, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. Let's see what Kevin looks like here. And of course, every frame is awkward, like I said. (mumbling) That's what I came here to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin and all the land around it, escaped on a boat, and I need to reintroduce myself to the world. And? I'm thinking a sequel. Hmm, part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else? Okay, so that's gonna cover my clip here. So, let's bring this down. Come over here. And let's see how this exchange works, and then we'll rough it in. Appearance to the world. And how are you gonna do that. Sequel. Hmm, part two. How to Photoshop Everyone Else? No. Action Man. All right so we just got a couple frames to get rid of here. So when we cut to Kevin, after he said the line, he should already be in his expression. 'Cause that's what the natural human reaction time would be. And we have a little bit of him saying How to Photoshop Everyone Else. So, right before his head turns there. Boom. And how are you gonna do that? Cut this. Yep. He should start leaning forward and talking. You see how I'm just getting rid of all these little frames? It's dead air, we call it. Nothing's happening. And how are you gonna do that? Sequel. Hmm, part two. How to Photoshop Everyone Else? No. Action Man. Now, if I was Quinton Tarantino, I would put Action Man on the screen in really big bubble letters. And what he just did there is really important, not just for this dialogue. But Ross will constantly take live conversations, like our Expedia film or wedding vow exchanges, and he'll trim off three frames here, four frames here, and he'll compress time. He'll take all the pauses and the ums and everything so that when you're watching it, it seems like a smooth, seamless conversation with no gaps at all, when in reality, it was much choppier and had a lot more air or a lot more pauses. And you can do that with the live events very effectively. Yeah, and not to be confused with taking out every pause, 'cause remember, when it's time to feel something, give a beat, give a pause. That is important to know when that's supposed to happen. So, it's not every pause, but in something this back and forth, you want to cut the air out in between lines. So he says Action Man, and we'll see what his close up looks like here. Part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. I like it. No, Action Man. So, you basically want to make your own spin-off movie? And there would be a time to feel something. Action Man. He's gonna, Kevin Kubota, the blue shirt, is gonna process. Are we wearing the same shirt? That'd be weird. Kevin Kubota is gonna process, the viewer is gonna process. Just for a beat. Actually, Kevin showed his iron. Oh. Mine's iron, we'll attempted iron. Maybe a failed attempt, but it was ironed. So you basically want to make your own spin-off movie. And I know he got this line right. So basically you want your own spin-off movie? Spin-off? Listen Kevin with a K, automation is the wave of the future. Action Man is like a freaking super hero. We know we wanna hold that whole take. We don't need to cut anything out there, 'cause the acting's so good. Can we, when he says, listen Kevin with a K, go back to the two shot? You wanna get rid of this acting? No. I just thought seeing the two of them together when he references Kevin with a K it'll bring us back. We're about to come back into it because we're gonna make Kevin with a K disappear. 'Cause he's a figment of his imagination. But, we're about, and it's interesting that Jeff brings that up because he is, he's sat with me editing. He's done this enough to feel when it's time to come back to something. And he's right, because in about two shots, we are gonna go back to that. A little early, but he's right. It's about time to go back to that two shot. So let's see how this plays out here. And because this is the most intense moment, we don't wanna pull away from it. We don't wanna pull away from the faces. We wanna stay into the characters and really get the emotion of it. Not really. Important. That's why I came here. I blew up my cabin in the woods, blew up all the land around it, escaped in my boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. And how are you gonna do that? Sequel. Hmm, part two. How to Photoshop Everyone Else? No. Action Man. So you basically want to make your own spin-off movie. Gah, spin-off! Listen, Kevin with a K, automation is the wave of the future, Action Man is like a freaking super hero. A few frames, jumped right there. Spin-off movie. Gah, spin-off! A few more frames. Your own spin-off movie. Gah, spin off! Listen Kevin with a K, automation is the wave of the future, Action Man is like a freaking super hero. So, notice he trimmed off a few frames so that when a time it cut to him, he was already moving. So, let's find out what the next line is. So then he thinks for a moment. So we wanna have him thinking for a second. Not a close up. Let's get him a shot of him thinking. Again. No, Action Man. (laughing) No, Action Man. Wait, so you basically wanna make your own spin-off movie? Gah, spin-off. Whatever you say Kevin with a K. Automation is the wave of the future. Action Man is a super hero. Hmm. What do you say? I think you don't need my approval because I am you and you are me. Is that a medium right there? Yep. When he says I am you and you are me, what's your plan? To go into the close up there, because it's impactful, or to go to the two shot. When he says I am you and you are me, I'm gonna go to the shot where Action Man is looking at his hand and scale into him while he's pondering it. Then I'm gonna come to the close up. And I'm gonna have him say wait a minute. I'm not even here. And then I'm gonna cut to the wide shot. You're not even here. And then Kevin's gonna disappear when he says that. Hmm. What do you say? So, I need to find a what do ya say. You don't need my permission. Basically you want your own spin-off movie? Gah, spin-off! Listen, Kevin with a K, automation is the wave of the future, Action Man is like a freaking super hero! Come on, what do you say? So, I'm not even gonna give him the reaction. I'm just gonna let that clip ride, and I'm just gonna drag it out a little bit. Action Man is like a freaking super hero! Come on, what do you say? I'm gonna go right to that clip here. I think you don't need my approval. Because I am you and you are me. Yes. So, instead of shortening that like you did, what about L cutting it so that while he says come on, you're seeing him kinda already looking pondered, 'cause he had some really great facial expressions, there. I would still shorten it, and I would just do this. Automation is the wave of the future. Action Man is like a freaking super hero! Wave of the future. Action man is like a freaking super hero! Come on, what do you say? I think you don't need my approval. Because I am you and you are me. So, let's get this shot here. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. Now, he had a little head shake that you took out just before (mumbling). You don't need my permission. You are me and I'm you. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. And then when he says you don't even exist, that's when we'll give him the fade out. Now (slapping). Here's a really good lesson, and here's a really good point. Ideally, if I was on a set where I had all the time in the world, and the lighting was right, and everything was perfect, and I had my picture perfect situation, I would be dollying into his head when he says that line. Can't do that, but I can. So check this out, I double click this clip and I wait for him to say the line. Are me. I am you and you are me. So what I would do here is I'm gonna go to the effects control, I'm gonna go to the beginning of the clip. I'm gonna go to Motion. I'm gonna put a key frame on position, so I'm gonna click this right here. Can we explain what a key frame is? Yes. Okay, so a key frame basically is I'm gonna basically, when you put an effect on something, you affect it to the whole clip. If you put a key frame on something, you can say I want the key frame, which where we put in the beginning, I'm gonna start the effect here at this capacity. So basically, when I put those key frames there, it's saying at this point in the clip, I want the scale to be 100, what we brought it into the program as, and I want the position to be right where we have it. I want it to be standard. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go to the end of the clip. The very last frame. And I'm gonna put another key frame. I don't even have to put a key frame. All I gotta do is change it. And it'll put an automatic key frame. I'm gonna put 110 here. And you see it's scaled? Because I have key frame at the beginning of the clip and the end of the clip, it's gonna slowly scale that as I go. The reason I'm doing the position key frame is because scaling looks like scaling. So whenever you scale a picture, you see it kinda scale, it looks very scaly. If I hold the position of my original frame, it'll look like I'm actually moving. So, what I would do is I would double click the clip here and I would just slowly move it over to the left and up a little bit. And see this line right here, that's the position it's gonna follow, so that when he says this. I am you and you are me. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. And it's very subtle and slow. We're gonna make it a little more. I would say 117. I might be a little crazy, but we'll give it a shot. I'm gonna move it down a little bit and let's see what happens now. Are me. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. It's good. All right so that's perfect. And the reason why that works so well, one of the real big tricks to making a post-production scale work is actually having a semi, hand-held shaky camera look. When I say shaky, I mean fly on the wall look. Because if it's very still, like a photograph, it's just gonna scale in one direction. You watch a lot of movies, you'll see sometimes where when they're, they might be on a steady cam and they might slowly walk in, and it just got that human shake to it, where it's still going in, but it's got that, a little bit of rock to it. This simulates that, and you really can't tell that we're scaling it. It looks like I'm walking into his face. So, that's-- Now, I'm gonna ask you on behalf of everybody out in the Internet to delete what you just did and do it one more time. Because I could not redo what you did. I understand what you did, but I couldn't do it in the steps. Okay. So, take that effect off. Right click. Remove effects. I'm gonna click on motion, 'cause that's all that I put the effect on. So, here's what the clip looks like without it, full screen. And you are me. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. Okay, so, let's go to the first frame here. So, you would double click on the clip, so bring it up in the-- Source screen. Source screen. It would show up there. Click effects. I would go to motion, put a key frame on the position. Which means simply just click the little clock on position, that's what establishes the key frame. Yep. Okay. Same thing on scale. Then I'm gonna go to the end of the clip. A frame I can see, not black. Now, both of those little clocks are still clicked. I don't have to touch those clocks anymore. In fact, if you touch those clocks, it's gonna remove all your key frames. Got it. I'm gonna go to 117, click enter. Then I'm gonna double click this clip. Now, double clicking it, what? Makes motion active over here? Makes the position active. Position active. And you can see, I have the scale lines here, next to me so I could scale this clip, and I'm just gonna move it up a little bit like that, so that his eyes are on the top horizon line, and then move it over a little bit there. And then once you're done moving that, everything you've done has been set in the effects. Yep. So, we watch it. And you are me. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. That's great. So now, let's go to our finale two shot here. Let's get Action Man, who's speaking the line. You and you are me. So, I don't even exist. Wait, you don't exist. Action Man's back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! (laughing) So let's get Kevin here. Now, this is gonna be the trickiest part of our little demonstration. Hopefully, we did it right. I am you and you are me. I'm not even here. Oh, wait, you're not even here. Action Man is back, baby. Oh, god, let's not do that. So basically, I need three shots to composite this. Here's why. I need the empty chair. So, I'm gonna get the empty chair. I get that here. You don't exist. Put the empty chair here. Move this over. Then I'm gonna get Kevin sitting. I say you don't really need my approval because you are me and I am you. I am you and you are me. Okay, so let's do this. I'm gonna explain everything I did once I'm doing it. I'm just making sure it works before I embarrass myself in front of the entire world. Not afraid to do it, though. What did we say before? We can paste our attributes on the crop from the beginning? I think the crop was on the Kevin Kubota side. So let's copy, let's paste our attributes on both clips. Which both, 'cause there's three? The Kevins, just the Kevins. The bottom clip is Action Man. Wait, you don't exist. And that's where I want Kevin to fade out. So I'm gonna move this clip here. I'm gonna bring this over here a little bit. Ugh, timing. Okay. Let's see if we can find another one here. Too much. 'Cause you know what? I am you and you are me. Don't move, Kevin, don't move, don't move, don't move. That should be enough time to get rid of him. So basically what I need is enough time to fade him out. Yeah, unlinking, deleting the audio? Yeah, audio's irrelevant in this entire demonstration for this purpose. Can't you just freeze the frame? Would that not-- No, because then you're freezing the frame rate. It is a good theory but it won't work because you'll see the stillness of the frame, so to speak. So let's see if this works. I don't even exist. Wait, you don't exist. Action Man's back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! (laughing) And Paul is back, baby. That's the reason Ross's editing DVDs are called Making Magic. (laughing) So, let's watch that back, 'cause I can't believe that actually worked without any experimentation. I don't even believe it. Hero! Come on, what do you say? I think you don't need my approval. Because I am you and you are me. I am you and you are me. So, I don't even exist. Wait, you don't exist. Action Man's back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! (laughing) (clapping) All right, let's take a question. Do we have any questions just starting here? We just have a minute or so left before break. That is so much fun. And I love, we were just saying, I love watching your expression, seeing it all come together, too. Ross is over here. (gasping and laughing) I guess, I don't know, this might be kind of a like working process question, but how do you keep with being like too excited about your work that you, I know you have the producer who then looks later and says no, that's maybe not quite what it is, or you're up at 4:00 a.m. and you're delirious, and you think something's hilarious and you wake up the next day and it's not. But do you have any checks that you do while you're editing to try and keep things in perspective? Honestly, the more you look at footage, the more you hate it. So, usually, it's never the latter. It's never the more you watch it, the more you love it. So, I usually become numb to it and start to find mistakes. That usually never happens to me. I have had it when I went to the premier of my last film, I had a very depressing thought 'cause I was look back in time, about a year and a half, and I was thinking oh, my god, what was I thinking a year and a half ago. But that's how long film takes, so you get better while you're doing it. Every time you look at something, you see back in time. When me and Jeff did our first same-day edit, it was one of the most rewarding experiences because I got to see how good I was right then in that moment, as opposed to when it was over, I'm looking back, I'm like man, I learned so much doing that that this is garbage now. Same-day edit was the Shawn and Ruthie wedding film where she's opening the gift and he had been buying it a week earlier, and so we put that whole thing together during the reception, and at the end of the reception, showed it to them and so it was a lot of fun.

Have you ever thought about using your talents, training and equipment to design moving images to tell a story? This film workshop is your opportunity to learn how to become a visual storyteller with Jeff Medford and Ross Hockrow. Whether you're a photographer or an aspiring filmmaker, you will come out of this class with all of the skills to produce web commercials, wedding, birth, family and event films.

Discover what you'll need for your camera bag, lighting, how to shoot a conversation - all during a live shoot! You'll learn how to create a story throughout the editing process. This film workshop is 3 days of non-stop information, all of which will allow you to expand your business and increase your profits.

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • Great 3-day workshop! I work for a college, teaching students to communicate via the video medium, as well as producing video for promo and events. This video is super useful to me... The most basic info was review, but it's great to see another team's approach to explaining and teaching the concepts. Some of the more advanced materials is on level or a reach for what I'm doing, so it's teaching me to move forward with my abilities. Just a note to the Creative Live folks, I love the idea of viewing for free and buy if you like to see again. I was able to catch a half hour here and there, which was enough to convince me to buy the whole thing. I wouldn't have been likely to plunk down $99 for a video when there really is so much out there for free. The difference, and reason it is worth it, is because this is so well organized and complete, and discusses a broad range of budgets as well as info for a range of skill levels. This live for free then pay to download model is great.
  • TERRIFIC workshop! Extremely helpful/educational ... and rather entertaining, too. (Bear in mind, I'm new to the cinematography end of things.) I'm pretty sure, no matter where you may be on the experience scale, you'll get enough ideas from this program to make it well worth your watching. I love the way they prioritize equipment needs & wants, and help us sift through the PILE of options out there. And their "$750 starter set-up" was definitely an eye-opener. (Um ... that's AFTER your camera and lenses, guys.) It's critical (and difficult) to maintain audience interest over a 3-day course ... otherwise, even the best material will go right over our heads. But Jeff and Ross were perfect together -- playing off, and feeding, each other continuously. Sometimes their banter is used for clarifying potentially confusing concepts ... and other times just for chuckles. All-in-all, I would recommend this to any but (perhaps) the REALLY advanced cinematographers out there. (Scorsese ... keep your wallet in your pocket.) For anyone considering purchasing the videos, consider this: Most of us who've already bought them ... did so AFTER watching a considerable amount of the workshop for free. That should tell you something of the quality of this material. Thanks, Jeff and Ross, and Creative Live!
  • <p>Came to this course late (Mid 2014) in fact was being hit with promotion for the new Filming Motion course that Jeff Medford&#39;s group have put together, and was trying to work out where to start with a DSLR getting into capturing more than still images, and found this course. The taster sessions looked really good, so went ahead and purchased the course, and not disappointed. One hiccup is that they regularly refer to materials on the Cinestory.com/Creativelive page, which alas is no longer there, but searching for Ross and Jeff across YouTube finds most of the materials that they refer to, I think it was only a copy of the script which I never found, but I do not feel not having this detracted from the learning experience - indeed Ross edited the script on the hoof while filming, and then again while editing.</p> <p>Very good introduction. Left me wanting more, but also left me feeling I know what it is I need to be working on next - &quot;Shot Sequencing&quot; as it happens - for which I am hugely grateful. </p> <p>I think without this course I would have ended up meandering into constantly improving gear and producing at best mediocre materials.</p> <p>Many thanks Jeff, Ross, and Creativelive.</p>