The Art of Filmmaking and Editing

 

Lesson Info

Shoot with Kevin Kubota

We have already discussed all the gear. This is the first time we're actually gonna use it live. So if you can see here, I have my boom pole. The technical term for this is a shotgun mic, but we get lazy. I've been around Ross too long, and a lot of times, we call it a boom mic, 'cause it's on a boom. But it's a shotgun mic on a boom. We've already extended it out. You can see that this particular boom pole has several sections that will allow you to lengthen it or shorten it. You simply twist and there you go. And then that'll give you all the requisite lengths that you need. And can you tilt the head, please? That is directional. So what direction it's tilting does make a difference, and you'll want to adjust that. It always goes above the person's head. So we'll just adjust those kind of things live. Proper position for me would be higher. Just out of frame. Higher. Just out of frame. Right there. Hold this for a second, please. So what we have, I did not bring them. Shu...

re makes a wireless transmitter and receiver specifically for boom poles. The transmitter will actually plug in right here and just sit on the end, and then you can plug your receiver into here, and then you wouldn't have to worry about all these cables. I did not bring to this particular shoot, so what we have is an XLR cable. Now, I see the girls in the audience sitting there going, what is going on? Cables, cables cables. Look. This is not rocket science. This particular cable is called an XLR cable. Can you look at that? You see how it has three holes right there? Those three holes simply line up with, right there, those three holes, and you plug it in. It's not complicated at all. And then the other end of this, those three prongs line up with the end of your H4N, right there, and it plugs in there. That's just simply how we're getting the sound from the mic into the recorder, okay? So why don't you come on up. You're gonna be our audio monitor. You're gonna actually operate the Zoom, and you're gonna put on these headphones. Now, we use noise canceling headphones whenever we're doing this. The reason for that is because if you don't have noise canceling headphones, which, it's fine, they'll work, but if you don't, sometimes what's happening outside, you can confuse what's happening through the microphone. And using the noise canceling headphones helps to isolate outside noise that's coming in through the ear cups. It helps to isolate and reduce that so you're literally hearing just what's coming off of the mic. Because if you don't do that, sometimes a distracting noise won't show up quite as much. The other thing to notice is that because this has two inputs on the back here, you're only gonna have sound coming out of one ear from the microphone, because it's plugged into just one input. Does that make sense to everybody? So, you go ahead and take this and hold the cable, and then I'm gonna place these on your head. He washed 'em first. Can you hear the talking? Mic check, one, two. Okay, you can hear that, right? Now, can you hear, I want everybody, you can't hear this at home, but I'm sure you can imagine what's going on? Can you hear that? Yeah, it's really loud. It's like really loud, right? Can you hear this? Yep. Any shaking at all, when you're using an external mic like that, in fact, the reason I picked you for this is 'cause you were telling me at lunch that you had a portable recorder for one of your projects, but somebody kept on banging the table, and so you couldn't use any of the audio, because the recorder was on the table, correct? So, we wanna make sure that all those kinds of things, all those distractions are gone. It's your job to call speed, and it's your job to interrupt the filming if audio accidentally starts to get out of spec. With one caveat. If there's a noise or something like, you know, the operator moved or something and it's just a little noise and it's fine after that, you let it roll, and then you just tell me after the take that that happened, but if it's obviously a frequency or, you know, some buzzing. Something's if there's a loose screw on the mic or something like that, there'll be this like crazy buzz, or, you know, if a plane takes off in the background or anything like that, you would just look at me, yeah. I'll be looking for you to, yeah. So, you know, no one should really interrupt the take except for the director, but you can, you know, be like hey, sounds like crap. So, yeah. Another thing to recognize here, since we're using the Rode NTG3 mic, we had to set the H4N, in the menu, we had to set phantom power to on. Remember, phantom power sounds crazy and scary. All it is means it's just providing power to the mic. If we didn't do that and we plugged this in, it would be dead, and we'd be like, this mic doesn't work. What's going on? Don't buy the NTG3, plug it in and not hear anything, and think you have a busted mic. You probably don't have phantom power turned on. It's a setting in the H4N, okay? So, there's one other thing, if you wouldn't mind holding that, that I wanna show you, if we could get camera on the menu here. So, can you see, Ross, why don't you go ahead and talk into the mic? Hello. Can you see the line rising and falling there? Mic check, one two. Can you see that from that angle? Are we too shaky, or are we good? How do I sound? How do I sound? That is what I'm calling your audio exposure, okay. It tells you how much sound is coming into the system. And if you wanna adjust how sensitive your recorder is to sound, you do that, we're plugged in right here to the one. You hold down the one, and there's a level button here on the left. Do you see that? We're going up. We're going to 50. We're going to 60. We're going to 70. 70, 80, 90. Ross, I'm gonna put this all the way to 100. Why don't you talk loud for just a second? How loud do you want me to talk? Wow, that hurt, right? (woman laughs) Did you see how the one started to blink on here? What that means is you've just overexposed your sound. Now, it's not really called overexposure. It's called. Overmodulate. It's called overmodulating. Blown out. But it's the same thing as blown out. It's the same thing as when you overexpose a photo and everything goes white and there's nothing there. That's what you've done here. You've overexposed your sound, and you never, ever, ever, ever want that to happen. It's better to have low sound, 'cause you can always bring that up in editing. It's impossible to save. It's impossible. So what we wanna do then, we're gonna hold down one, and we're gonna reduce this, and we would like, ideally, to keep this in a level. There's negative 24 here. There's negative 12 here. There's negative six here, and there's zero here. And once you reach zero, that's when you're gonna overmodulate your sound. Your ideal recording level is negative six. That's about where you want it. That space between, let me get the light back on here, the space between negative six and zero is a buffer area for you, because obviously when people talk, they're gonna do this, and then they're gonna get excited and be like, yeah! And as that happens, that sound goes up and down. You need that buffer area, 'cause you're not always gonna be able to control. So there's two, there's two solutions to this. One, you can, if you have a mixer and an audio engineer and someone's writing the sound and they know when someone's gonna get loud, like maybe someone's talking in your scene, and then they get really loud and they start yelling, I apologize, they can monitor and pull the levels down in realtime, or you record that line, the louder stuff, separately, and compensate with the audio recording level. So, or, the third option is know what the loudest level your actor or subject is gonna go to, and then just compensate for what they're gonna get, how loud they're gonna get, and then everything else will be low, and then you turn that up in post. Ideally, you wanna record 'em separate and get clean sound, but it's a lot easier to turn something up than it is to turn it down. In fact, if you overmodulate, you're not turning it down. It's dead, it's over. It's dead, yeah. So, a couple more things. First of all, there's a feature on this, on the Zoom H4N where you first monitor your audio. So here I am. I'm gonna press that, and it's blinking. When it's blinking, that means it's ready to record but not recording. Talk into the... Microphone check. You can hear everything, correct? Notice how the numbers here are not advancing. Time is not advancing, meaning it's not recording. This is to prime you and get you ready to record. When you're ready to record, when you say speed, you press it a second time. The light stops blinking. The timer starts counting, and now we're actually recording. Yeah, you actually record and then say speed. Okay? And a lot of, I've made this mistake a time or two where I press the button and I'm like speed, and the thing's blinking, and we've gone through a whole take, and I'm the goat, right? So, make sure it's not blinking anymore, that the numbers are incrementing. And in that situation if you're the audio guy and you are the goat, just say, like, oh, there was a frequency. Lie, just lie. Well, yeah, that's Mr. Poker Player there. Okay. So, when we get ready and we're on the set, remember, you're gonna press this button right here, which will bring the input level up, and then you're gonna go up or down on this side to adjust your levels. I'm gonna let you, I'm gonna look over your shoulder, but I'm gonna let you adjust the level when we're doing a mic check with Kevin to make sure everything's good. Why don't we bring you up here, and Ross, why don't you show him how to operate the boom pole? Okay, so, you're gonna be over here, and first take, Kevin's gonna be sitting in that chair right there. You're gonna sit right next to each other. You guys are gonna be best friends. And take up the slack maybe with your other hand, just so nobody trips. That's good. You're gonna have to extend that out as he does that. The reason this does the different length is obviously so you can stand in different positions. Obviously, if it was full length, you'd hit the wall here. And depending on where the shot is, so, you can see on the monitor where the microphone is. So it's gotta be right there for Kevin. Hi, I'm Kevin Kubota, and this is how loud I talk all the time. It never changes, even when I'm Action Man. How does it. How does the sound check? How does it sound? Action man just went just over negative six. Well, he won't actually do that. And, so yeah, this is where you wanna be. So that's good. We're sitting at about negative six right now in my conversation. No, actually, it's below negative 12. Which is fine, because we know that things are gonna modulate and whatever. You may wanna pump that up. So press the number one, and then bump that up. What are you at now, in the 50s? Well, you gotta talk. Okay, so right now, press the number one, and then adjust the side, yes. Yeah, I bumped it up to 62. 62, okay. So now when I'm talking, are we hitting about the negative six level? Nope, not yet. Okay, keep on going, keep on going, and then I'm still talking. I'm talking to myself, not really. I'm doing this just so she can get a mic check, and normally, I can't run out of things to say, but now, I'm feeling pretty stupid. Okay now you're at negative six. Awesome. Great. You have to be, and you wanna look at the monitor and see where you're standing, 'cause you need to be against the wall, completely against a while, so you're out of frame. Perfect. And then you wanna hold this. You don't need to do it just yet. Go up. But you can see how uncomfortable it is. One thing you wanna be mindful of with this is if you have lights, the boom shadow. Ah, yes. So, see, see behind Jeff right there? See that? Behind him, there's a shadow. Right there. Right there. So, two things have to happen. Number one, you gotta be real still, and then the shadow won't get noticed, or put the shadow right there. Sound check, mic check. Am I booming out? Is the sound check still good? Are we hitting about negative six still? Or did we need to bump it up? Well, actually, there was a car that went by. It's going by right now. Okay, yeah, and you can hear that. Is that something we have to stop for? No, but I'll hear it as well. 'Cause I'm hearing a frequency. Yeah, I'll hear it and I'll know. Okay. So that's a great example of how, when you're monitoring audio, you hear extra sounds. She alerted us to that. I wasn't paying attention to the fact that the car was there, and when she mentioned it, I'm like, oh, yeah, there is a car there, but when she's monitoring, she's hearing that like whoa, there's a car about to crash through this brick wall. Like, that's how loud it is. So, way to go. All right, so let's, Kevin, you wanna come on in? One more thing before you come in, Kevin, I just wanna mention, if we can get a shot here. Here's our setup of our main camera. Notice how we have the Rode mic on it. One of the things we didn't talk about is that these external camera-mounted mics use a nine-volt battery, which means they have an on/off switch. If you turn it on, it's really easy to know that because what happens is you'll have a green light. Maybe we can set the camera over here and get a picture of that green light. Green LED light right there. That means, hey, you're turned on. Audio is going from the mic and into the camera. If you forget to turn that on and you're all excited about your footage and you take it into the editing board, what are you gonna hear? (Ross hisses) Nothing. Because if you don't turn on the power, again, a lesson from experience. So if you don't turn on the power, you're not gonna have anything at all, and then you're kind of really screwed. So make sure you remember to turn that on. All right, Kevin, come on in. All right, so the first thing we're gonna do is the wide shot. Now, here, there's a couple of reasons why I'm choosing to do the wide shot. First, the wide shot we're attempting is insane. So if we get it wrong and I test it during the break and it doesn't work, we can always redo it in the second section. But that's not gonna happen. We're gonna get it right, right? Ready? Ready. Wintertime handshake. All right. So, the second reason why we're doing the wide shot, and a lot of times, you have to ask yourself, who do you care more about? You care more about your talent on the camera or your lighting guys? 'Cause the light to light a wide shot is a lot harder, so it's gonna take a lot of time to set that up. So sometimes, we'll go and we'll do medium shots and closeups 'cause the lights, you know, you can move lights, you know, you don't have to worry about getting light stands in the shot. You don't have to worry about hiding microphones, and it's just a lot easier to shoot medium and closeup shots of specific people, although a wide shot is more for an establishing shot and a lot less used in a conversation. You're gonna use medium shots the most, right, the most used shot, and the closeup is the powerful shot in film, as we remember from yesterday's segment on storytelling. So, as Kevin is over there in the corner talking to himself and preparing as an actor, I'm gonna let him use this wide shot as a warmup. Really for me as the filmmaker, all I need out of this wide shot is the beginning of it and the end of it, and hopefully, if all goes well, maybe one usable segment for the middle. But I don't need it for really the acting, so to speak. So when he does the wide shot, I can make all my adjustments. He can run through it on camera, get a little more comfortable with it. The more times he says it, the better he's going to get as it goes on. So, I let him do the wide shot first, and I'll let him run through it even though I don't need it so that he can practice. And if I get something magical out of it, great. If not, I'm not worried about it. Really, all this segment is is about getting this wide shot, which is gonna take a little bit of time, because he's gonna have to. When we start here, this camera's set up. The wire's taped down. Once we start recording, we can't even breathe on this camera, because if it moves, we're screwed. We have to redo it. So Kevin, the blocking of this first shot is you're gonna come from right off camera. You can literally start from right here, and you're gonna, as you see it in the script, you're, Kevin, I'm gonna light the candles myself to start the scene. You're gonna come into the shot, and the chair is purposefully far away from the table so you don't hit the table cloth. So I don't touch it. If your knee hits the table cloth, that's fine. I can move this back actually a little bit. And you can sit this way. The DVD will have, I'm gonna have Jeff sit in and pass you the DVD across the table, and he can play off you, and I'm gonna give him the script to read. Okay. One, I'm gonna give you that, and then I'm gonna give him the lines so that you can play off him too. It'll be funny to watch Jeff read the lines. So, for comedic value, it'll just be great. (Jeff laughs) You cool with that? I'm good. All right. Yay, Jeff. Do we have the DVD handy? Yep. Okay. So, Jeff. So I'm gonna sit here. While you're doing that, I'm just gonna make sure. You're not recording now, right? Good, okay. When you're ready to stop, you just press the stop button, and you'll notice that that light goes out completely. So it's good. Okay, so Jeff, basically, here's what I need from you. Timing. So you're playing Action Man. You're gonna read all of Action Man's lines. Do you know how to use an iPad? I know you're a PC guy. I know how to use it if I have reading glasses. Okay, so you'll just slide over to the next page and you'll see. Don't worry if the words don't come, the timing-wise. So essentially, what I need from you is to stay in character as Kevin, which is a lot easier than staying in character as Action Man, although they do say the hardest person to play is yourself in film. I don't know if it's necessarily true. But, you know, we'll find out. So, Jeff's gonna read those lines. The very important thing, Jeff, is to leave. Space. Space, so that I can put his lines on top of yours. And I'm Action Man. You're Action Man. And when this DVD gets slid across the table, you're gonna already be sitting here. I just want you to be sitting here. And so, he comes, the Action Man comes in second. The reason why I'm having you sit there is so you don't mess up the integrity of the table cloth or anything around it. But what you're going to do is I'm gonna cue you. I'll say, Action Man's walking in, and you're just gonna follow with your eyes, like this, and just pretend he's walking in, and you'll see when you have to hand him this DVD, and when you hand him this DVD, make sure you get it across the table. I'm gonna slide it, like that? It would be better if you lifted it. Hand it and lift it. Lifted it, lift it over. Got it. Okay? And then right at the beginning here, I had one little suggestion as far as tying this into the preview or the movie that you guys showed that we did, in that he would ask me, is that a cell phone? So I'll be checking my watch. Instead of checking my watch, I'll check my phone for the time, you know, when he's late, so I'll just kind of have my phone out, and then when he sits down, going into this part here, sorry I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic, and then, is that a cell phone? Sounds good. Final decision? Okay, what just happened is actor read the script and wanted to make a suggestion. Here's what I would say about that. You know, if you wrote it and you're directing it and it's your vision, obviously you're more tied into it than they're going to be as an overall project, but the same goes for the character and the acting and the on-camera presence. They're more tied into that than you're ever going to be. They're going to be able to take that character further. So when we did this Photoshop Everyone film, I wrote the script, but Kevin got a hold of the script, and he was the one actually playing the character. So he's the one hat actually got to be those people, and he, you know, you lay the framework for the on-camera talent, but let them take it as far as they can take it. So he made a suggestion. I like it. It doesn't compromise anything I wanna do, so I let it go. Now, if he wanted to suggest something like man, it would be really cool if we cheers'd glasses, 'cause that would be funny, that would compromise the integrity of what I'm doing, because it would mess up the crop line. That's a production thing, and I would say no, we can't do that for this reason and this reason and this reason. So, good suggestion. I like it. Let's do it. Cool. One more thing, one more point I wanna make. If we were actually recording two people together talking in one take, the boom mic would go directly above the table, between the two people talking. But since we're gonna record this as a series of takes on just one person, the boom mic will always be over the head of the person. Kevin. It'll just always be over Kevin's head. Yes, of Kevin, with Kevin. Yep. Exactly. Okay, all right, so, now Kevin. What we're gonna do is we're gonna run through the whole thing, and at the end, when he, when Action Man, when your character is sort of saying I'm you, we're the same, I just want you to, you're gonna sit there very calmly and then when that's happening, and he's saying I'm you, you're me, you're just gonna get up and then walk this way over the, not across frame, but over here and just kind of hide over here. Okay. And the reason why that is gonna happen is 'cause I'm gonna make you fade out of the chair. Cool. Now, try, I know it's not very easy, but try to get up without moving the chair as much as possible. I know it's very difficult, but if you can, great. If not, we're cool. Okay. So I'm gonna be watching. Ten-four, baby. Ten-four. All right, so you know where to come from? The floating camera, just be careful not to hit that light when you're doing that, because if you do, we're gonna be redoing it. We're just walking through it right now? We're not, I can have this with me, or you want me to? No, actually, we'd like to do it for real, unless you wanna walk through it. Maybe walk through once if that's cool. Okay, let's walk through it. If we have time for it. Yeah, we have time for it. Okay. Personally, my personal opinion is I like to film rehearsals, because you never know what's gonna happen on the first time. A lot of times, if the actor doesn't know their lines perfectly, some people overmemorize, some people undermemorize and let the inspiration of the scene take over, and sometimes in the first take, something really organic will happen, and if you're rehearsing and it comes out and you don't have a camera rolling, eh, you know, you're gonna be a little, you're gonna be a little upset. So, somebody asked, we got a question over the internet the other day about working with non-actors, and I'll say, yeah, we're not gonna record this take. Audio people are gonna record this take. Just kidding. You're gonna have the script on you, right? Yeah, but I can, is the floor in the shot? Can I just throw it on the floor? Yes, the floor is in the shot. That's actually the shot right there. So we can run through it. Let's run through it. Okay. How'd that happen? I don't know. I turned off the... Whatever. So, I'll leave this then. You can cue me if I forget a line. Okay, let's run through it. Go ahead. (Kevin sighs) Aren't you supposed to say action man first? No, we're running through it, so just go ahead. Oh, okay. Sorry I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? Oh, heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you just traveled by boat? Mind telling me what this is? Sorry, that's my line. Hold on. Am I Action Man or Kevin Kabuta? You're Action Man. That's what I was reading. No. Put your glasses on. Let's start from the top. I'm Action Man, right? And you see why we have to have rehearsals. Okay. Yes. Sorry I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you just traveled by boat. Anyway, do you mind telling me what this is all about? Excuse me, my movie? I'm really having a hard time following the script. I apologize. Maybe the printed sheet might be better. Okay, yeah, let's use the printed sheet. Technology. Apple technology and Jeff don't get along. Whatever. My kids have an iPad, your old one. Yep. (Kevin imitates tape rewind sound effect) And go. (Kevin imitates tape fast forward sound effect) Sorry, I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you just traveled by boat? Anyway, why are we here? Do you mind telling me what this is? This is my movie, my Photoshop DVD. I'll just slide that across the table there. Excuse me, my movie. Do we wanna have the actual DVD in here? All right, so why don't you sit behind there, and I'll rehearse a little. That would be a better idea. (all laugh) I know how to operate the camera. This is what movie making's all about here. I know how to operate the camera. Let's do it. I'll make a fool of myself. Does that mean I get to say action, or am I no longer action man? No, I'm directing and starring now. I'm Ben Affleck. Let's go. All right, sorry I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you traveled by boat. Anyway, tell me what this is all about. Mind telling me what that is? My movie. Yes, How to Photoshop Everyone. You mean, my movie? No, see, that's me. Right there. Kevin with a K, Kubota with a K. Ah, I see where you're confused. That's me, Action Man, with an A. Why are you making that face? Yeah, see, sorry. And you hold it up and you say. This is me, clearly. But you're kidding, right? It doesn't even look like you. The bone structure, it's all wrong. That's me. Right? Am I right? Yeah. And then you say, is there a point to this meeting. Right, sorry. Okay, one more time. All right, that's me. Is there a point to this meeting? Yeah, well I'm glad you asked that, because you know I don't come out of hiding unless there's a good reason. I was visited by a girl, Allison. Do you know her? I do. Yeah, so she knocks on my cabin door and asks me to teach her about actions. And? So I show her, and now it's on this DVD. Explain to me how that happened. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop, right? So she goes to the coffee shop. The coffee shop guy shows her all about how to streamline her workflow. Then the Daywalker, he shows her about layers, and then she goes to the Geek, and he shows her how to fix problems, and Tony, Tony the chef, he shows her how to make things beautiful with art, and then you show him actions! Her actions. It was great stuff. We had to put it on a DVD. We made this movie. We shared it with the world. It's cool, right? No, it's not cool. I've been in hiding for 50 years. I let one person in my cabin in the middle of the woods, and now I'm starring in a movie? Costarring. Oh, no, I'm the star. Technically, you're a supporting role, but that's not really important. Well, that's why I came here. That's what I came here to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin, and all the land around it, escaped by boat, and now I need to reintroduce myself to the world. And how? A sequel. Part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. I like it. No, Action Man. So you basically wanna make your own spinoff movie? (Ross laughs) Spinoff. Whatever you say, Kevin with a K. Automation is the way of the future. Action Man is like a superhero. (Kevin and Ross laugh) Okay. So what do you say? You know, you really don't need to ask my permission, because you are me, and I'm you. I am you. And you are me. Wait a minute. I'm not even here. Or wait, you're not even here. Action Man is back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! (Ross laughs) I need the laugh. What? You do that crazy laugh. I can't do it like the Joker. He laughs like the Joker. (Kevin laughs) And then that's it. Yeah. Okay. It's harder to do with somebody else than myself. Do you want no one there? No, no, it's good. I like you. It's good having you there. Do you want me to do it? No, it's good. What we did is fine. I was just. No, I'm saying, do you want me to do it? I'm just commenting to the world that practicing and talking to yourself is much different than talking to somebody else. Do you want me to be the reader instead of Jeff? Yes. Okay. No, you're better than Jeff. All right. Well, that's the first time I ever saw it. (all laugh) That was the first time I've ever read it. You wrote it! That's different than reading it. You reread it tons and tons of times. All right, girls, in the hotel room later tonight, let's settle this, all right? Let's do it. But right now, let's get back to work. We've got lots of stuff to do. What has to happen is once you press record, Once she presses record. I'm operating the camera now, right? Yes, you're not operating anything. You're pressing record, and then you're guarding the camera. Because if anybody moves it, this shot's not gonna work. So I'm gonna stay here. So, question. It's going down past negative 24 at some points, but there's only one point that it goes way past negative six, and that's when he says traffic. So should I bump it up, or will that traffic blow out? Bump it because, when we get into the closeup stuff it's probably where that line will go anyway. Okay. And I say traffic. No. Oh, he says, don't you travel by boat. Okay, yes. Okay. All right. Okay. And I have a beginner's question. Would the candles be lit for the beginning of this scene? I'm gonna light 'em. You're gonna light 'em when we start shooting, okay. Yep. Now you guys ready? Okay. So, where's what's gonna have to happen. Is your outfit for Action Man handy? In the back room. Okay. So, here's, we're gonna run through this take. If it's good, then you're gonna run. You're gonna change clothes, and then we're gonna switch sides, and there won't be any rehearsal for the next side. Okay. Is that cool? Sure. Comfortable with that? Think so. You don't look comfortable. Let's do it. Let's do it. It's always better when I'm not comfortable. Here, can you throw the mic on top of him in the position you want and then do a mic check? So, I thought you don't wear underwear. I don't. Why not? Well, it usually cramps my style. I thought you didn't have any style. That's 'cause I don't have any underwear. Touche. Touche, Basil. Touche. Touche, Basil. Touche. (Jeff laughs) We should just improv this. Okay. Is that all? May I go now? Yeah, you wanna hold it in that position, and he's, we're gonna be ready to go. Okay. We're good. All right, let's do it. Okay, so the only part that I'm slightly confusing the timing is when you start talking. I'm sitting down. I'm looking, and then as I check the time is when I see you walk in. Yeah, I'll say I'm walking in. Okay. I can't get this one lit. Ow. There's an answer to this question right here. Cheating. If you don't cheat, you don't try. But the continuity might be a problem, because that eventually will sink into itself like that other one did. So do you wanna try to do this? No, this is okay. You sure? Yep. So those are the kind of things you need your support to bring up is continuity, things like that. And a lot of the things with the candle, even if what Jeff said happens, I could show you in editing how that's not a big deal, 'cause you're always gonna have some continuity flaw, so it's best that we just make our own in control that we know how to overcome in editing later. All right? It's always better to pretend you intended to make the mistake than to just make the mistake and not intend that you intended it. Of course. Okay. Speed. Roll. Rolling. And action. Sorry I'm 47 seconds late. Traffic. Oh, cell phone. From the top. (all laugh) Keep everything rolling, keep everything rolling, keep everything rolling. Keep everything rolling unless they say cut. Yeah, which I didn't. So we're gonna keep everything rolling, because it's so early on in the take. That's why I didn't cut it. And action. All right, I'm walking in. Sorry I'm 47 second late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, no, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you only traveled by boat? Anyway, what's this all about? Mind telling me what that is? Ah, my movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Excuse me, my movie. Ah, no. See, that's me, right there. Kevin with a K, Kubota with a K. Ah, I see where you're confused. See, that's me, Action Man, with an A. Yeah, no. Why you making that face? 'Cause I forgot my next line. It's okay. I think you're the one who's confused, because this is me. Yeah, right. Ah, I think, I see where you're confused. That's me, Action Man, with an A. Why are you making that face? Is that my line or your line? No, it's my line. Okay. I think you're the one that's confused, because that's clearly me, see? You're kidding, right? It doesn't even look like you. The bone structure, it's all off. That's me. Is there a point to this meeting? Is there a point to this meeting? Yeah, well, I'm glad you asked that, because you know I don't come out of hiding unless there's a good reason. I was visited by a girl, Allison. You know her? I do. She knocks on my cabin door and asks me to teach her about actions. And? So I show her, and now I'm on this DVD. Explain to me how that happened. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop, right? So she goes to the coffee shop, and the coffee shop. Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So she goes to the coffee shop. The coffee shop guys shows her all about how to streamline her workflow, and then the Daywalker shows her about layers, and then she goes to the Geek, and he shows her how to fix things, and then Tony, oh, Tony shows her how to add the art to the images, and then you, you show her about actions. And it's great stuff. We had to put it on a DVD. We made it. We shared it with the world. It's cool, don't you think? No, it's not cool. I've been in hiding for 50 years. I let one person in my cabin in the middle of the woods, and now I'm starring in a movie? Costarring. No, I'm the star. Technically, it's a supporting role, but, you know, it's not really important. That's what I came her to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin and all the land around it, escaped on boat, and now, I need to reintroduce myself to the world. And your plan is? Part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else? No, no, no. Action Man. So, you basically wanna make your own spinoff movie? Spinoff? Whatever you say, Kevin with a K. Whatever you say, Kevin with a K. Automation is the wave of the future. Action Man is like a superhero. What do you say? Sorry, I'm, I gotta compose myself. So what do you say? I think you don't need my permission, because I am you, and you are me. I am you. And you are me. I'm not even here. Wait. You're not even here. Action Man is back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! I can't do the laugh. I just can't. All right. Cut? Yes, you can cut. We're gonna do that again. And cut audio? You can cut audio. We're gonna do that again. Now, I heard a lot of. Yes. In the Tony part, a really loud car went by. Yes, no, the car went by. Kevin made some mistakes. This is why we do the wide shot first. So you'll see that as we do this, he's gonna get smoother and smoother. I might even memorize the lines halfway through this. (Kevin laughs) So it's all about adjustments. So, Kevin, what I'll say is the acting is good. When you make a mistake, just try to go back to the line before it, and just give us a lead-in to that. And then everything else is solid. I have no corrections for you on Kevin. You're really good at playing Kevin Kubota. I don't know how you got so good at it. It's hard. It is hard. Yeah. I don't think I could do that. Let's do it. Okay. You ready? I'm ready. Though one suggestion, something I noticed, maybe I'm wrong. Yeah, go for it. But when he walks in, he's kind of just going like this, really quick, instead of literally kind of following him in more of a drawn out kind of way. So, I don't know if that will match up. As he's walking in, you mean? Yeah, no, that's a good, this is a good note, but it's also a note for the closeup. When we actually have him follow, it'll be a closeup shot of Kevin. Yep, got it, okay. Yep. I just wanna get him in the habit of doing each thing, repetition, and you notice that he made some mistakes on some of the lines and then we just went back to a different line and kept going. When you do a commercial or something that's staged like this, you're gonna have to know that you can piece things together. So in my head right now, I'm already, I'm already taking a count of what lines he said that were good and what weren't. Ready? Ready. Let's do it again. Speed. I'm really gonna play Action Man this time. Rolling. And action. Sorry I'm late, 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you just traveled by boat. Anyway, what's this meeting all about? Wanna tell me what that is? My movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Excuse me, my movie. No, yeah, that's me, see? Kevin with a K, Kubota with a K. Oh, I see where you're confused. Actually, that's me, Action Man, with an A. I think you're the one that's confused. See, that's clearly me. You're kidding, right? It doesn't even look like you. The bone structure, it's all wrong. Is there a point to this meeting? Well, I'm glad you asked, because you know I don't come out of hiding unless there's a really good reason. I was visited by a girl, Allison. Do you know her? I do. She knocks on my cabin door and asks me to teach her about actions. I'm aware. So I show her, and now I'm on this DVD. Explain to me how that happened. Well, she, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So the coffee shop guy, he shows her how to improve her workflow. The Daywalker takes her out, shows her all about layers. Then the Geek shows her how to fix things in her images, and Tony, Tony shows her how to add art to her images. And you, you showed her about actions. It was great stuff. We had to put it in a DVD and then share it with the world. Cool, right? No, it's not cool. I come out of, I've been in hiding for 50 years, and I let one person in my cabin, and now I'm starring in movies? Costarring, technically, yeah. No, I'm the star. Well, it's actually a supporting role, not really costarring. That's what I came here to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin and all the land around it and escaped by boat. (Ross laughs) I need to reintroduce myself to the world. Such as? A sequel. Part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else? No, Action Man. So you basically want your own spinoff movie? Spinoff? Whatever you say, Kevin with a K. Automation is the way of the future. Action Man is like a superhero. So? What do you say, huh? I say you don't really need my permission, because you know what? I am you, and you are me. I am you. You are me. I'm not even here. Or wait. You're not even here. Action Man is back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! That it. Okay, so what, cut. Cut, thank you. So one thing I wanna point out is notice the difference between the first take and the second take, how much faster it went and how much more smooth it went, as far as chemistry is concerned. I'm not Action Man, but he's starting to get to the flow, and then I'm starting to memorize some of the lines. So now it's starting to get a little smoother, and we're gonna do it another time. It'll be even faster. Just one more take on Kevin, and then we're gonna switch to Action Man. And you'll see, as we keep doing the takes, it'll get smoother, and then when he switches to Action Man, it's gonna be, it'll go back, reset to sort of be choppy, and then it'll get smoother. It'll be a little rough. And by the time that's over, this segment'll be done, and then we'll go and do all the mediums and closeup shots. Mediums and the closeups? Yeah, once we have the wide stuff, we'll do it. Does Chef Tony make an appearance? Chef Tony makes an appearance, but. With them? Not with them. Okay. He's on screen separately. Okay. You guys ready? I kind of like playing Action Man. (Kevin laughs) Speed. Rolling. And action. Sorry I'm late, 47 seconds late. Traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart rate monitor. Traffic? I thought you traveled by boat. Anyway, what's this, what's this meeting all about? (DVD thuds against table) Mind telling me what that is? My movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Yeah. Excuse me, my movie? Yeah, no, clearly it's mine. It's Kevin with a K, Kubota with a K. Ah, I see where you're confused. That's, that's me, Action Man. With an A. Yeah, no, I think you're the one that's confused, because this is clearly me. See? (Ross laughs) You're kidding, right? That doesn't even look like you. The bone structure is nowhere near correct. What's the point of this meeting? Well, I'm glad you asked, because you know I don't come out of hiding unless there's a very good reason. I was visited by a girl, Allison. You know her? I do. She knocks on my door, and asks me to teach her about actions. And? So I show her, and now I'm on this DVD. Explain to me how that happened. She, she, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. So the coffee shop guy, he teaches her all about workflow, improves her workflow. The Walker teachers her about layers. Then we send her to the Geek, and the Geek teachers her all about how to fix problems, and then of course there's Tony. Tony teaches her how to add the art. And them you show her about actions. It was good stuff. We had to put it on a DVD and share it with the world. It's cool, right? No, it's not cool. I've been in hiding for 50 years. I let one person in my cabin in the middle of the woods, and now I'm staring in movies? Costarring. Oh, no, I'm the star. No, technically, you're a supporting role, but that's not really important. That's what I came here to discuss. I've since blown up my cabin and all the land around it, and now I want to reintroduce myself to the world. How? A sequel. Oh, part two, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. No, Action Man. So you basically want your own spinoff movie. (Ross laughs) Oh, spinoff. Whatever you say, Kevin with a K. Automation is the way of the future. Action Man is like a superhero. So? What do you say? I say you don't really need my approval, because you are me, and I am you. I am you, and you are me. I'm not even here. Or wait, you're not even here. Action Man is back, baby. Action Man is back, baby! (Ross laughs stiffly) All right. Hold up. And cut. All right. Great. Action Man close. Nobody move. I'm gonna get up. What if I go like this? I'm gonna get up, and I'm gonna switch over to this side here, okay, and the reason we're being so careful around the camera is because these two shots we're actually making, we're playing them together. So they look like a single shot. Yes, they look like one single shot. And there clearly will be problems with it that we'll have to fix in editing, and that's the whole idea of this entire exercise, is to show you how to fix that. While we're doing this, we actually could take a question or two, while we're waiting. Perfect. So let's do it. We have some questions that a number of people have been asking, and one of the main ones is from ScottRealWI. No clapperboard? How do you keep track of the takes and the audio sync? Fantastic question. I'm gonna have you guys back up a little more. Sorry, I'm gonna answer the question in a second. That's all right. Back up a little more. And right there is good. Okay, no clapperboard. Clapboards are for film, because film does not record audio. So you need some, when you hear the clapboard and you see the clap and you hear the sound of the audio, you know you lined those two, that visual and that audio signal up, and then everything else is lined up. With this, we have audio on the camera, and we're actually gonna use PluralEyes to line up the audio for us so we don't have to do anything. We're cheating. 'Cause if you don't cheat, you don't try. But I'm also gonna show you how to line up audio the hard way, and it'll help you get in the rhythm of seeing a wave and being able to see a wave and adjust a wave is really important to editing to sound as far as music is concerned. So, clapboards are more for film that don't contain audio. That does not mean I wouldn't use a clapboard in some situations, but it's not necessary to actually line up the audio. Yeah, it's not necessary, but it can be helpful if you don't have PluralEyes, or if you just wanna be safe. It'll be really easy to (Jeff claps) just do that, because then, it'll create two audio peaks, one on the audio recorded into the camera, one on the audio that's recorded into the zoom, and since they'll be at the beginning of each clip, it'll be very easy to line them up that way if you're not syncing automatically with PluralEyes. You don't ever use a slate just to keep your shots organized? No, because they're always file. The file numbers, they just shoot in order. So, a lot of the times what I'll do is I'll log footage, like this. You'll see me do this. I'll go through every single shot and categorize it. Like, I'll make a bin for medium shots, a bin for closeups, a bin for wide shots, so that I know where everything is. I'm actually gonna have him lengthen the boom pole a little bit since from where he is, there's a shadow. Yep, yep, and I just dip it. This'll go even longer. Very careful, be very careful. I'll take another question while we're waiting. Perfect. Yes, we have VerandaChannels asking, during interviews, I often take mental notes of what is being said and use that as a shot list for b-roll or additional camera angles. Is that a good approach? That is an amazing approach, and if you'll actually go and watch that wedding that we showed yesterday, that Shannon and Amy wedding, you can Google that on our YouTube, our CineStory channel, you'll see that words bleed into each other a lot, like one of them's talking about family, and one's love and then they sort of blend into each other, and like there's a part where she says, family is like the branches of a tree. We actually just show a tree, like literally just in the backyard. Oh, my God, it's Action Man. (Ross laughs) With the sun streaming through it. I didn't know that our pants and shoes would be showing, so I'm gonna have the same. That's okay. You are me, and I am you. You know, you're right. (all laugh) Okay, whoop. Don't approach the table. Do not approach the table. Do you want the glasses on for part of the scene, none of the scene, any of the scene? I'll take the glasses on for the whole scene if you want to. Whole scene? Okay. Yeah. Now, I just made a conscious decision to let him wear his glasses, but I've also made things harder on myself for the sake of reflection. So you'd have to be very careful of that. I'll probably regret it later, but I'll show you some tricks on how to avoid that, 'cause people will be wearing sunglasses in your shoots that you can't tell 'em to take it off. So I'll show you how to deal with that. You guys ready? Go. Can we do a sound check? We can do a sound check. Kevin? Action Man can be a little bit louder sometimes and softer. Yeah, that's a good point. You would specific, you're gonna have to, you're gonna have to adjust the sound. So at the end when he goes, Action Man is back, baby, Action Man is back, woohoo, that you're not overmodulating on the woohoo, which means. Actually, what she should, what you should do. Yeah, go ahead. When he's gonna say it, when he starts saying Action Man is back, baby, he'll say it low, and he'll start to get louder. When that happens, you can lift the mic up a little bit, 'cause he's gonna get loud enough where even your best bet is to lift it up as opposed to try to get it in realtime 'cause he's gonna go up so fast. But what I'm actually gonna do is cut to the shot of him in Photoshop, the movie, where he says it for real. So. Okay, yeah. But the idea is to try to get them. Another way to do it would be to record the whole scene up until the very end, and then lower your levels just for the last line. We could do that too. Yes. So there are three ways to do it. You can move the boom mic. When we do the closeups and the medium, you will lower it for that line. Yep, great. Yep. Good job. Thanks. So Kevin didn't actually talk during any of that soundcheck. Microphone check. Oh, you want me to talk? (all laugh) You wanna explain this to me? Huh? Explain this to Action Man. Action Man is back. Explain this, explain this, check, check, check. Check, check. We're good. Talk in my direction. Yes. It's very important that he talks in my direction. When he was talking. (DVD crashes into floor) Sorry, my bad. I apologize, guys. Talking in this direction. When he's talking in that direction, it'll be different than talking towards me. Ross, does the hat interfere with kind of audio going up so that the boom mic needs to be slightly forward of his face? Very minimal, I would say, probably not. So, but it should be forward anyway. So where it is is good, where it is is good. If it was like, on top of his head. I can see, yeah, I can see the very end in the shot. So we're good now. Okay, let's do it. Okay, speed. Audio good? Hold on. Am I supposed to be rolling? No, he's gonna get up, so. I gotta walk in, right? Yeah. You ready? I think so. Speed. Rolling. And action. Sorry I'm 42 seconds late. It was traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart monitor. Oh. Traffic, don't you travel by boat? Whatever. Anyway, why are we here? (Action Man's jacket rustles) Explain that to me? Ah, my movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Your movie, are you kidding me? That's me. You see, that's me, Kevin, with a K, Kubota with a K. Ah, see, I think you might be a little confused, because that's me, Action Man with an A. Why are you looking at me like that? I think you're the one who's confused, because this is me. See? Are you kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bone, the bone structure, that's me, see? That doesn't even look like you. It's me. Is there a point to this meeting? I'm glad you asked, because, I was visited, oh, I forgot something. Yeah, okay. You don't come out of hiding very often. I'm glad you asked. Because, you know, I don't come out of hiding unless it's very important. I was visited by a girl. Allison. You know who I'm talking about? Yeah, I know who you're talking about. Okay, so she comes out of nowhere, knocks on my door, and wants me to teach her about actions. So, I show her, right? I show her, and now, the next thing I know, it's on this DVD. Can you explain that? Well, she wanted to learn about Photoshop. You know, the coffee shop owner showed her about workflow, and then the Daywalker shows her about layers, and the Geek spoke about fixing problems, and Tony, Tony taught her how to add the art, and you about actions. So we made this DVD and shared it with the world. Cool, huh? No, it's not cool. (Kevin and Ross laugh) I've been in hiding for 50 years. No, it's not cool. I've been hiding for 30, 40, 50 years, and this one person comes knocking on my door out of nowhere and I show 'em about actions, and next thing you know, I'm on this movie! I'm starring in this movie. Costarring, actually. No, I'm the star. Well, by Academy definition, you're at the costar. Okay, okay. That's what I came here to talk about, all right? I blew up my cabin, all the land around it. I escaped on a boat, and frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. How so? A sequel. Ah, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. No, Action Man. So you basically want your own spinoff movie? Spinoff? Okay, Kevin with a K. Automation is the wave of the future. Action Man is like a freaking superhero, okay? What do you think? I think you don't need my permission. You are me, and I am you. I am you? And you are me. You're not even here. I'm you. You are me. I'm not even here. You're not even here. Aw, Action Man is back, baby. Action Man is back baby. (Kevin laughs raucously) (Kevin stomps across stage) All right, cut. (all applaud) Really quick, really quick. We got a battery. We have to do this again, because the battery is dead. Yes. No, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. What are you about to do? I'm about to take the battery out. And you think you can do that without moving the camera? Well, there's no other option than to. We could run through it really quick. Open the door where it is and try to get it out. Okay, give it a shot. So what we've come across is a disaster. Yes, we have, because the. It won't open, right? That's correct. Let's run through it really quick. Do we need Chef Tony for this shot? No, we don't. How much battery do you think you have left? We have a take if we do it right now. Let's do it. I know, he got loud and low. He slaps his legs, and you talk over it every time. Okay, I will not talk over him. I should know better than that. No, his leg slap. Yeah, let's do this. This is the real world. Speed. Bring your whisper up a little bit. Start from the top, bring your whisper up. Kevin, do you keep the How to Photoshop Everyone on the table the whole time, or do you hold it in your lap? I pick it up, look at it, but then I put it back down. Okay, let's do it. Ready. Speed. Bring your whisper volume up and not your tone. I have a note about this I will explain to the viewers at home after this. Ready? And rolling. And action. Sorry I'm 42 seconds late. There was a traffic. Is that a cell phone? No, it's a heart monitor. Traffic, don't you travel by boat? Very funny. Whatever. Why don't you tell me why I'm here? Explain that. Ah, my movie, How to Photoshop Everyone. Your movie? Hello, that's me. No, actually, that's me, Kevin with a K, Kubota with a K, and I'm the single greatest human being that's ever lived. See, that's where you're wrong. That's actually me. See, that's where you're wrong. That's actually me. Right? That's where you're wrong. I see where you're confused. That's me, Action Man with an A. Yeah, okay, sorry. So, I'm Kevin Kubota, greatest human being that's ever lived. I see where you're confused, but that's actually me, Action Man with an A. Why are you looking at me like that? I think you're the one who's confused, because see this is me. Kidding me? That doesn't even look like you. The bone, the bone structure, see? That's me. Is there a point to this meeting? I'm glad you asked. I don't come out of hiding unless it's really important, okay? So I got visited by a girl, Allison. You know who I'm talking about? Yeah, I do. Okay, so out of nowhere, she comes knocking on my cabin door and wants me to teach her about actions. So I do. And the next thing I know, it's on this DVD. Can you explain that to me? Actually, I can. She wanted to learn about Photoshop. The coffee shop man taught her about workflow. Daywalker teachers her about layers. Geek teach her about fixing problems. Chef Tony, he teaches her how to add the art, and then you, you teach her about actions. Cool, right? No, it's not cool. I've been hiding for 30, for 60 years in the woods, and the first person I let in my cabin comes in, and the next thing I know, I'm starring in a movie. Costarring, actually. No, I'm the star. Actually, you're in a supporting role. Look, okay, that's what I came to talk about. My cabin's blown up. The land all around it's blown up. I escaped on a boat, and quite frankly, I think it's time for me to make a reappearance to the world. How so? A sequel. Ah, How to Photoshop Everyone Else. I like it. No. Action Man. So you basically want your own spinoff movie? Spinoff? Look here, Kevin with a K. Automation is like, the wave of the future. Action Man is a freaking superhero. Huh? What do you think? I think you don't need my permission. You are me, and I am you. I'm you? And you're me. So I don't even exist. Wait. You don't exist. Action Man's back, baby. Action Man is back, baby. (Kevin laughs maniacally) All right, cut. (all applaud) All right, we made it through. Okay. So, he, one thing I'm thinking about when I'm doing this, obviously I'm in the scene as well now so I can't pay attention as much, what we needed from those shots is just the beginning and possibly the end, and maybe, maybe a shot in the middle of we get lucky. But, you know, I had a lot of acting adjustments that I wanted to make for him, but we don't need to do that until we get into the medium and the closeup shots, because that's where the emotion is gonna come out, the inflections on certain lines, and then we can start to make line adjustments. And you can see how a script evolves. So you can see, as I was doing the script, when he says, no, actually, I'm the star, and I say, well, no, by Academy definition, you're actually the costar. We get a little more technical. So you can see that the script starts to evolve as you're doing it, because you really, as a writer and then when you're visualizing it, it's sort of tough to feel it when you're actually there. You can do best you can, but once you're there and you see him actually acting, you saw me try to play Action Man, and then you see him come in and do it, and it's a totally different experience. So, you guys have any questions, you four? So I have a question. Is there anything else we need this for? How is Chef Tony coming into the. Chef Tony, it'll be a different shot. Completely different? You don't need the wide shot at all. Completely different shot. We don't need a wide shot. Okay. Okay. So we're done with this. Yep. And see now, what's great about what he just asked is Chef Tony, if you guys are following along at home with the script, you see Chef Tony lights the candle. I actually, I'm only gonna have him do this at the end. So when he talks about Chef Tony and we cut to him, in the beginning, when you see him light the candles, which I'm gonna blow these out now, I'm just gonna have hands light it, and you'll see the sleeve of Chef Tony. And then when he references it, you'll know later on. It'll be like a reveal at the end of the story that Chef Tony was there the whole time. And the last life Chef Tony has is, Action Man, yeah, right. I'm the one with the hit cooking show. Because in the How to Photoshop Everyone movie, we staged Chef Tony as like his own cooking show. We had like the laugh track in the background and everything. So we just try to recreate that. So, that'll be the, you know, sort of like the commercial yesterday where we kind of ended it on a funny, open-ended note, we're gonna do the same thing here. Do you guys have any questions? Good, good. Did he overmodulate when he screamed at the end? Mmhmm. Yeah. I was able to control it a lot better the second time, but since we hadn't done a run through, I didn't know how much he was gonna go up and down during his reading, 'cause your reading was pretty level of Action Man. But his reading was whisper to shout. And so the first take, there's a lot of really lows and really highs, but the second take, I was able to sort of predict the tonal changes. Yeah, and you were adjusting levels on the fly? Is that what you were doing? And when we, when we, when we go into the middle, like the medium and the closeup shots, that's when we'll really get the audio clean and crispy and sounding good. Let's take some questions from the World Wide Web. Sounds great. So we have one from Joplina. Does the script supervisor or director visually reference the master shot throughout the rest of the shoot? Yes. Yes to which one? Well, yes and no, yes and no. Okay, so a master shot, what they're asking, like the master true shot of the whole scene, that would, whatever you're shooting first, obviously, would be your sort of master shot. But it's not a question of referencing a master shot, because, like, sometimes, like, if we were to have this, if we wanted to overcomplicate this, let's say when I originally visualized this, I had them eating, and that would have been a nightmare, because we would have to make sure the same amount of food is on their plate, that he's eating the food with the same hand every time, that he's, you know, eating the same sized piece of meat and food on the fork. All that has to sort of match up. So it's not referencing the master shot. It's just making sure that it's consistent across them all so they all reference each other, essentially. But the question was, was it the director or the script supervisor that does that? Script supervisor references the, like the amount of food on a plate or the length of a cigarette or the continuity of all that, but obviously the director, the director is responsible for everything that happens. They're responsible for everybody. So, and then the audio person's monitoring audio, but the director's usually wearing headphones. Cinematographer's operating the camera, or camera operator's operating the camera, but the director's looking at a monitor and seeing so they can adjust anything and everything. Now, essentially what a director is doing is sitting behind a monitor with headphones and trying to watch the movie and each take and visualize it, make sure that their vision's coming to life. Okay, thank you. Another quick question was just about candle continuity earlier and whether the candle continuity was manageable because it's in a neutral zone and so it's gonna be okay during the edit? Well, the candle continuity's not gonna be as big a deal because it's only gonna be on, you're only gonna see it in the wide shot. So you're only gonna see it two times. I purposely, Jeff pointed out that the candle continuity would be a little different as far as the candle sinking in eventually, which is exactly what happened, and I did that on purpose. I wanted to make a purpose, purposeful continuity flaw so I could show you how to make that adjustment. And like, a cool story is, when I did my second film, my second movie, there was a conversation and I wanted, we didn't have the technology or the budget to move the camera in a smooth, professional way, but I wanted somebody to get up, walk to a sink, get a glass of water, and there wasn't a script supervisor on set, and he actually sat in the wrong seat, and we shot the entire scene, and we didn't notice for months, for months. And then we got in editing and we realized, whoa, he's in the wrong seat, and the shot of him getting up was terrible, so we couldn't use it. So if you actually watch that scene, we successfully got him to change seats in the scene without anyone noticing. I wish I had it to show, because it was really impressive, but you could see that you can overcome any continuity flaw through editing. Bold words, bold claims, Mr. Ross. Bold claims. Bold claims. You can overcome anything in editing. Just so everyone knows, Ross's nickname is Bold Claims Ross. Bold Claims Ross. That's right. Yeah. Life won't be the same for the next 24 hours. What? I said, your life won't be the same for the next 24 hours. You should not have shared that information. One more question. And you might be covering this tomorrow in editing. But if the camera records time codes and the H4N records, they also record time codes, can't you sync audio and video automatically with the time codes? You can use time codes to sync audio and video, but, somebody asked this on my Facebook, actually, and I answered it. Time codes are more for video tape. You know, when you have one really long clip of something that's like an hour and a half and then you have audio and you're tying to reference certain parts, that's what a time code's really useful for, but with digital and making different files and different takes, really, at the end of the day, when you see how we do this, we're gonna have the same number of audio clips and video clips, so you know, this one and this one, this one and this one, this one and this one. They all go together. So I'm gonna show you some tricks for how to find your audio really quickly. I also think it's important to point out that this class is not supposed to be about how to make a movie. Remember, we started the day with microbudget filmmaking. So we don't want to overcomplicate things with time codes. It's not that they're not useful. It's not that they can't be used. We're trying to show how you can successfully do this with the least knowledge and training possible and still make something that's compelling, interesting, saleable to add to your business. It fulfills a creative need for you as a hobby. So, those questions are great, but we're trying to show you how you can do it in as simple a manner as possible. Take a couple more questions. Great, we have a few more minutes, if that's, if that's good, okay. Question from Irent was do you need good audio from the wide shot if you can take it from the closeups? Great question. Okay, so, unless Kevin is a robot, the answer is you need clean, if you can see it and you can see his mouth moving, you're gonna need the audio from that shot. Just because he says Action Man is back, baby, in the wide shot, doesn't mean you can take the audio from the closeup because it sounds better and put it underneath the wide shot and expect it to line up, because he's gonna say it different every time. That's not to say you can't get lucky, and that's not to say you can't in a pinch possibly give it a shot, but it's gonna really most likely look like a terrible kung fu movie or bad ADR, which is, ADR is a situation you really never wanna be in. I ADR'd an entire scene one time and it was the worst experience of my life. And ADR means to record after the fact. Record after the fact. But go with the movement of the scene. So essentially, somebody would be watching on a monitor themselves, hear the original audio, and then try to mimic that on top, right on top, and then you take the clean audio. And usually, it never works. Even in a movie, I could see it. Like the new trailer for the Mark Wahlberg and Russell Crowe movie, Broken City, has some terrible ADR in the trailer, which is really weird to me, that they would actually put that out. But it's really bad. Well then the other thing you have to keep in mind, and you're gonna see this tomorrow during the editing demonstration, when you have audio coming from a certain character, that doesn't mean that what you're seeing has to be that character talking. You can be cutting to the other character and their expressions or their reaction and hear what the other character's saying without ever seeing him talking. So perhaps the way he said something right here is the best way, the best way to hear it or to listen to it. You can still use that audio without ever even seeing the wide shot, because you're seeing the other person's reaction or some other part of the scene. What Jeff just said is actually the key of conversation. It's really just, the short term for it would be an L cut, and I'm gonna show you how to do that tomorrow. Because this is comedy, and it's more funny, we're gonna use popcorn cut a little more often than I normally would. That's what popcorn cutting really is for. Which is. When basically, if I can see them talking, I can see them, as opposed to off-camera reactions, and it's gonna be better explained when we do the editing portion tomorrow, because I can show you the difference between the two and the different emotional reactions you get from that. But the point to answer the question is any audio that you can get from any part of the scene, closeup, wide, medium, whatever, can potentially be useful, so always record as best you can. Right. One more question. It seems that they weren't completely clean lines in between both characters, and I know that you're cutting our your, your portion of it. So how would you do that in the audio in post? Clean lines. In terms of audio. There was some overlap between the two of you. Was that a concern? There wasn't enough space left between. I did my best to not overlap Kevin, 'cause my audio obviously is irrelevant. There will be enough space in there to make the conversation and just keep in mind that the wide shot was more for the intro and the exit as opposed to the actual conversation itself. Keep that in mind, and that's what I was thinking about. We're not really relying on this setup for the conversation. We're gonna go for medium and closeup shots for the conversation.

Have you ever thought about using your talents, training and equipment to design moving images to tell a story? This film workshop is your opportunity to learn how to become a visual storyteller with Jeff Medford and Ross Hockrow. Whether you're a photographer or an aspiring filmmaker, you will come out of this class with all of the skills to produce web commercials, wedding, birth, family and event films.

Discover what you'll need for your camera bag, lighting, how to shoot a conversation - all during a live shoot! You'll learn how to create a story throughout the editing process. This film workshop is 3 days of non-stop information, all of which will allow you to expand your business and increase your profits.

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • Great 3-day workshop! I work for a college, teaching students to communicate via the video medium, as well as producing video for promo and events. This video is super useful to me... The most basic info was review, but it's great to see another team's approach to explaining and teaching the concepts. Some of the more advanced materials is on level or a reach for what I'm doing, so it's teaching me to move forward with my abilities. Just a note to the Creative Live folks, I love the idea of viewing for free and buy if you like to see again. I was able to catch a half hour here and there, which was enough to convince me to buy the whole thing. I wouldn't have been likely to plunk down $99 for a video when there really is so much out there for free. The difference, and reason it is worth it, is because this is so well organized and complete, and discusses a broad range of budgets as well as info for a range of skill levels. This live for free then pay to download model is great.
  • TERRIFIC workshop! Extremely helpful/educational ... and rather entertaining, too. (Bear in mind, I'm new to the cinematography end of things.) I'm pretty sure, no matter where you may be on the experience scale, you'll get enough ideas from this program to make it well worth your watching. I love the way they prioritize equipment needs & wants, and help us sift through the PILE of options out there. And their "$750 starter set-up" was definitely an eye-opener. (Um ... that's AFTER your camera and lenses, guys.) It's critical (and difficult) to maintain audience interest over a 3-day course ... otherwise, even the best material will go right over our heads. But Jeff and Ross were perfect together -- playing off, and feeding, each other continuously. Sometimes their banter is used for clarifying potentially confusing concepts ... and other times just for chuckles. All-in-all, I would recommend this to any but (perhaps) the REALLY advanced cinematographers out there. (Scorsese ... keep your wallet in your pocket.) For anyone considering purchasing the videos, consider this: Most of us who've already bought them ... did so AFTER watching a considerable amount of the workshop for free. That should tell you something of the quality of this material. Thanks, Jeff and Ross, and Creative Live!
  • <p>Came to this course late (Mid 2014) in fact was being hit with promotion for the new Filming Motion course that Jeff Medford&#39;s group have put together, and was trying to work out where to start with a DSLR getting into capturing more than still images, and found this course. The taster sessions looked really good, so went ahead and purchased the course, and not disappointed. One hiccup is that they regularly refer to materials on the Cinestory.com/Creativelive page, which alas is no longer there, but searching for Ross and Jeff across YouTube finds most of the materials that they refer to, I think it was only a copy of the script which I never found, but I do not feel not having this detracted from the learning experience - indeed Ross edited the script on the hoof while filming, and then again while editing.</p> <p>Very good introduction. Left me wanting more, but also left me feeling I know what it is I need to be working on next - &quot;Shot Sequencing&quot; as it happens - for which I am hugely grateful. </p> <p>I think without this course I would have ended up meandering into constantly improving gear and producing at best mediocre materials.</p> <p>Many thanks Jeff, Ross, and Creativelive.</p>