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Establishing Black & White Tones & Processing

Lesson 1 from: Black & White Photography Post-Processing in Lightroom CC

Serge Ramelli

Establishing Black & White Tones & Processing

Lesson 1 from: Black & White Photography Post-Processing in Lightroom CC

Serge Ramelli

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Lesson Info

1. Establishing Black & White Tones & Processing

Lesson Info

Establishing Black & White Tones & Processing

okay, I want to talk to you about black and white. I've always been fascinated by black and white. And when I started for a few 12 years ago, I looked like the work off Ansel Adams, which is like one of my hero in in Photography. And I was amazed by the power of his black and white. There's something about when you take out the color where you Plame or with eliminates and ah, different values and them. I got really lucky back about 34 years ago where I started working with a gallery Cogliano Corner. They have galleries all over the world, and but there was one thing that says We want to work with you, but we want to work with you, is black and white. And so they wanted to turn some of my color photo into black and white. And then, later on, they wanted to make a book about Paris and New York and exclusively in black and white. And so I really had to study hard, black and white. And, you know, how do you know how it works? Because it's not just like you take out the colors. Have you don...

e. There is really a science to black and white. And, um, that's where we're gonna be studying. So I studied a lot what we called his own system. And I stayed a lot what Ansel Adams used to do. He four different books. One is called the negative. The other one's called the Camera, and the 3rd 1 called the Printing, where he talks about all these different techniques. And, boy Woody Woody have loved light room because what he had to go through to ah, what he had to go through to make a black and white is kind of crazy. But the science behind it is mostly dodge and burn. So what does dodge and burn meaning? Why does it weighs it cold Odgen burn. Well, let's look at a couple of photos here. This is actually a dodge tool. So you see the way it used to work back in the days they used to take up a paper that was sensible to light. They would tape it on on the wall and they would project the photo the negative through a projector and because it was a positive paper, basically, mawr. The photo, the negative was projected against a positive paper and longer through protection more the light was going through mawr. It was burning the paper and more. It was getting dark and contrasted. Now, if you have a little spoon like this and you shake the little spoon you dodged a light lightens have heating. The paper is being dodged by that spoon, so wherever you dodge, it makes it brighter. So by shaking it, you actually feather your sort of brush strokes so you don't see So, for example, of the gentleman He's trying to make that head a little brighter. And so he's shaking the little doctoral here, actually, photo shop, uh, created. Let's see if we would have photo shop and you go into, ah, the Dodge to look at the look at the doctoral What it looks like. You see, it's the Dodge tool and look hardly used to be 50 years ago, So they just you know, all we're trying to do is stop the light from burning the paper. The reverse is this burning, meaning they would make canvas and, you know, they would just throw the light so this would actually just burn where there is the round and they would shake it also a little bit. That's where the blurry. So you don't see that it's really there because they're just trying to make the suit a little darker. So that's a history of black and white. Ansel Adams was doing a lot of like one to not only that, but he would, really. There is a very famous photo, which is called Something Over the Moon I forgot, but like the skies completely black. And he shows the before and after in his book and through a different treatment and not even using fielders. He made it from blue to black, which is a very, very common theme in black and white, where the blue becomes black. Back in the old days, even used to have red filters where they would screw it on the on the camera and shoot the sky. Redfield would make the sky blue, sky black instead of blue. So that being said, I studied a lot, You know how he was doing it, and I decided to go on the past off Ansel Adams and go to Yosemite, and I did the whole shoot. There was Luckily, it was better weather, and this is the first we gotta be working on. And there's one thing magical about black and white is that you know you can do great black and white when it's about whether when it's overcast when this cloud when it rains, this is the best time to the black and white. In fact, when I did my first book deal, they wanted to do a black. What about Parish? No problem. I can convert sunset photos, but I was shooting parish only on sunset and sunrise, but they wanted to deal words. You gotta make a book on New York. I've only been two weeks in New York, 12 years shooting Barris and two weeks in New York. How my doing a book on New York. But because he wanted black and white. I went there on the winter and it was overcast all day long. He was running was better weather all the time. But as long as something is going on a sky, my two worst nightmare in life is blue sky and white sky like pure white, pure blue. Anything else in between. I'm happy because you can, you know if you don't have color is you can go black and white and where the funny thing is, when you take a photo in in in bad weather like this one, it looks almost black and white because when you don't have the son, you don't have colors, you know? I mean, you see a little bit of green there, but hardly. Plus, it's a role file, and we'll files are known to a to be colorless, sort off. And so the only way I could do my new book was going when the When I knew the weather was gonna be Bassa winter. I shot in New York. I think it was like 20 F. Eso that's really low, like minus 15 Celsius have so much later on me I could hardly walk and eight hours pretty shooting. But the good thing is, I was able to get like 8 to 10 photos. I would go into per day, which is impossible in Paris, because only shot in the ring, sunset and sunrise, when you only have, like one in the Blue Moon impact. I mean, like, four times a month or something, You so I could have never done the Paris book. It was collar and I could do it because it's black and white. So I have this rule batteries or go out and take photos in black white. It's fun.

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