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Bold & Fearless Design

Lesson 24 of 26

Litter Poster Critique: Online Students

 

Bold & Fearless Design

Lesson 24 of 26

Litter Poster Critique: Online Students

 

Lesson Info

Litter Poster Critique: Online Students

a couple of years ago, I was asked by the School of Visual Arts to do A to make a little film and, uh, didn't have to be on any kind of somebody that gave me kind of free rein. And we just came up with this goofy little film. And, um, it's called. It was the first time I'd actually written this idea that it was called your work as a gift, and this is what we're working towards. I mentioned it once or twice here. This is what we're working towards, right? So I think it doesn't matter if you're a waiter or a bus driver or a designer of any level at any place. This is a powerful idea, and what it means is when you we understand this idea, in the particular lies the universal, which means that my loves and my fears are the same as, and the things that I desire are the same as everybody else's, right, because you and I am one to take that one step further is what happens is you put that in your work and then you were no longer working to satisfy a boss or a client you're no longer working f...

or a paycheck, right? You're working because you understand that there is an audience beside behind the boss, and there's something more valuable than the paycheck. And that's that's the real human beings who are gonna have to deal with the stuff that you make. If you put yourself in that you work becomes a gift, and more than that, you are. Your presence becomes a gift, right? This something to think about, Um, in order to bring that idea home, I've put it on a sticker because it was on a sticker. It must be true. So their work is a gift. Passes around Franco are actually have one and pass it on. Um, this is the goal. You know, the GOP stuff. That was my gift. Literally. This is this is the goal. All the time is to create a gift. You know, Um, so we move on, and, um, they're gonna be there, some working here. It's gonna be interesting. This and things that are coming up that, uh, that remind me of some important things to talk about that we didn't get to yesterday in the crypt. And honestly, you know the online stuff is gonna be interesting, because I can't have a conversation with him. Um, and even with y'all, as we say, I am with you all to really do a good job on each one. It would be an hour conversation, and we don't have that, you know? So you gotta pay attention. We're not even I'm not gonna be able to create all of them either. Especially all of the online stuff, because there was what it was like, 1/4 of a 1,000, give or take 1/4 of a 1,000,000. It was a lot of submissions, and he couldn't possibly go through them all. But we start. Oh, we start with Mart. And this is Bart. I believe it's from the Netherlands. Um, what you guys think litter. What's what's the idea here? What's the Oh, that was That was that was awesome. You're a champion if you clean up the streets. So that's awesome, right? And you see you see, You see, people kind of do that when they throw literal way to you. Single row bowl will stuff up in there like dear, you know, as long as when they don't get it, they go up and follow through with it. That's an interesting idea. I love the two dimensional and three dimensional. Any other opinions on here any other? Anybody see anything? Power pose, Lee, that this has got a lot going on. Right? Good job, art. Here we are. Another. It's hard to see because of the black. Um um Black on black. The A C D c. Look, um, but, uh, here's another hand throwing garbage now and now it's got what you know, words. A lot of words in this thing. Crazy. So many words. What do you think of this? Kind of obvious? Okay, Yeah. Living aggressive, like, really in black. Yeah. There. Hold. The treatment is you know, it's funny because it's it's, like using, like, uh, language like jargon. Like, really, It implies that, really, You know, I always love when people type to me. They say they write a type in, we're back, we're back. But they have, like, 15 days because they're trying to do the, um, the poltergeist thing, you know, like there. But, uh, right. But they're typing, and I'm, like, one work. Gotta, gotta gotta tell you It doesn't work. It was fine because we're looking at this in the on a smaller screen. And I was like, I really liked that line, That white line, right? I'm responding to something that's not intentional, but, you know, I become very literate, very literal when I'm reading these lift litter. That's funny, very literal. When I start reading these things because I look at that white line and I'm like, What does that mean? It doesn't actually mean anything. Oh, Elena Selenia. What do you think? What? You got reaction. Just nobody. Uh oh my God! Reaction party. Yeah, party hard Dio Marina. It's a bit disgusting. I don't know like it's like that. It is disgusting. But is that a bad thing? Probably about the leader. It's not. It's like it's God's reaction to Leader like OK, but now here's a question. Do you cover the city in this thing? And that kind of right? Yeah, right. Can you do that? Can we do that? Can we? Can we? You know, I mean, is it was this originally cute kittens? I'm assuming and kind of messed it up way. Oh, my God! Teoh! See? Now that's that's awesome. Again, this is We're just human beings. This happens. But you know what that is? Knee jerk. A knee jerk reaction. Because if it is kitty litter, then I'm gonna set it on fire. I'm going to go around through the city of New York with a mop with no fuzzies on and scrape this thing down. Similarly, I was seeing something with the double play of the litter of kittens like litter and litter. The wordplay there. Interesting. But yeah, it's kitty litter that I'm like, but it's just an interesting idea of taking that cute thing. And, you know, I have always said I've always said like to sit, like to think that what? One of the things that one of the tools that I use in my work is I like to say I like to say to say beautiful things in ugly fashion or to say ugly things in a beautiful fashion, right, cause just kind of like to invite that kind of contradiction like, Oh, I was expecting that to be, you know, You mean you don't mean it's, like, kind of draw people and go Oh, kids hands And then they go, Go! Oh, right. Yes, Melvin. So kind of see how, like the trash, the litter is placed on top of the mother cat, and then the the litter of kittens are like drinking from the milk of the mother cat Who's who might be eating the trash. Yeah, it's very graphic. Yeah. Yeah. And I don't know if that's a good thing or bad thing. So interesting. And again, Elena is not here, so we can't like ice. Can't you know? I can't ask her, you know? Does he like cats? You know, you know, tell me about your mother. You know, all these like important questions. Good job, kiddo. Jeannie. Jeannie. Gen. Jeannie. Um, what you guys think Don't be afraid to like. Say what? You don't be afraid to say anything, because what you're thinking is what we're thinking. You're like, you know, you're, like, channeling, so don't hold it back, please. Yes, that's an interesting perspective of showing the trash from the perspective of people who live on the streets. So, like, when? When you think of trashy kind of don't like, don't think of people who whose home kind that is this You don't throw trash in your home, right? You go and throats and knew. Well, that's a good idea to that kind of came up in this in a couple places is would, you know is Do you do this at home? No. Yeah, yeah. Um, any other takes any mother any common comments, Andy, But it feels a little shaming, and I'm not sure if that works. Um, it's kind of like it's basically saying you're bad for doing it, and I don't know that I don't know that that's an effective way to get through to somebody to have them change. Oh, I see. I see. I see. So that some of the different, you know, emotional tactics to employ here is to kind of embarrassed people or shame them or because we see that done. I mean, um, actually, um, the greatest state in the union. Texas has had a campaign that they've used for years, and it's called Don't mess with Texas, you know, which that's not an emotional thing, is just kind of like Texas pride thing. And then just the image of the state I mean, Texas is, isn't just at a different conversation is an interesting state toe look at, because what you see kind of everywhere is the image of the state of Texas. You don't see that in New York state. Other states don't use their silhouette is, you know, this kind of an interesting idea, You know? You know what New York has got that lousy heart that we associate with the, You know, I love New York, and we're going to see a lot of that government up. Tell you what. Yeah, this is interesting. Now what do you think about it? I don't want you can't talk about this to too much. But what do you think about the combination of ideas? Do you understand what I mean? We're talking about litter and that were introducing homelessness. Is that confusing? Does it work? Scott, you're shaking your head. No. Tell me what you're thinking. I think it kind of dilute the message a little bit. Or or you don't know what they're really what? Their main point is. Are they trying to talk to you about litter or about homelessness or something else? Yeah, I can see it. I can see it. Yes, Lisa, part of a syriza's. You had said this project was part of a Siri's Maybe it's just one part of it, Cleo. Kind of again on your point. It's if it's Archy like there's an exclamation mark under like, Thanks. It sort of seems like it's not taking it. Yeah, the thanks is the thanks is interesting. Yeah, again, it's the emotional, the emotional tactic. Okay, so, Jeannie, thanks for Thanks, Miley things. Giuliana, um I chose this out of the 250,000 entries because there's an interesting idea here in not in here, in here, in that doing a class like this and not really having the time to kind of really find out who Juliette isn't who Melvin is and kind of pull that out of you and see a consistency in your work. Like Like, say, Mariana has got a consistency of like she I can see that she's inspired by or has a very clean palette. And Juliette to like, messy things and somebody, you know, we don't get that opportunity here, But one thing that happens is when people see my work, it gives them permission to kind of be painting an experimental, and I see that here, and but I'm actually even responding to mean that actually looks pretty good, just just on its aesthetics, Not the idea. You know, it's an interesting idea to to hire a painter to do this problem. Right? That's kind of an interesting idea how to get a whole series of painters to do instead of designers. Because I think different, It would be much more. They think less. We often think too much. Right? What is this? Then there's this, but what about so and so And how about that influence? And they're just like, I'm just gonna make this done. Hope spelled it wrong. Done right. Say no to litter is you know that mean typographical e? It's fine. I got no crit to it. I mean, like, it's you can read it. Oh, well, client man, a client would have a field day with that e, I got to tell you, but actually, I was just gonna right on your screen was I was just gonna go. But the complete your in the meeting and the client goes the clients like I can't I can't read that e because was it? It's like it's really tight like this, right? Right. So I go. Oh, wait, wait. We would mean that he just just go better. I get paid now. Anybody. This comes from London Similar to another one, right? Trashy trash trash showing us trash. Yeah, me too. What's cliche? The I love New York sign I love New York is cliche. Uh, it's not a bad one or a good one. It just is right. Everything. Everything just is nothing is neither bad nor good. Really. Genocide might be bad. I would you know, I will give you that, Um, but putting a cliche on our cliches, Okay? Showing us later and putting it I love New York. It's not ironic, that's that. Here's the thing. The way this I love New York has put on in a very painterly it's not the official like what if he had the official one? So this ironic. It's like I love New York and then you showing you're showing that you someone doesn't love New York again. How you is not what you do. It's the way how to do it, right? Yeah, I'm curious. Why the I love New York is kind of an ugly fashion. Compared toa the trash, which is ugly as well. Nuts. Let's easy way to play, Easy to play, hard to win. I I looked at this one and my first reaction was huh? So I wanted to talk about it, and then I went away. Now, no, dude, you already won. Look, feeds right here. It's like it's like it's not that hard to win is done. Right? Um, what does that mean to you guys? Nothing. I mean, you're you're you're obviously not guessing because it's it's It's obviously bad. The whole title of thing litter is gonna be bad. Yeah. I mean, obviously, it's the reference to take tack toes and maybe they're saying, you know, make a game of it. I haven't a clue. I'm not sure. Yes. God, I feel like they want you to be the banana. So in order for you to win, the only where you're gonna go is putting a banana. Why would you recognize yourself as the banana? Because I'm trying to figure out some way to get the message of putting the banana into the trash can. And it will be in tick tack toe. They These things don't mix apples and oranges, baby. I know, right? Curious. And then the typography with the excesses. Kind of inching, so no kind of beautiful. Okay, here it is. We had we've had to trashes the kittens. And then the I love New York went when they were really kind of disgusting. This is trash, and it's kind of not disgusting. And there are people who have made art of trash. There was a guy who sold glass boxes with New York City trashing him. I kid you not. I know. The guy made some coin, right? Hey, welcome to New York. Slowly moving it out of the city. Getting tourists to pay 10 bucks for it was brilliant. I have an idea. Hell with recycling. It's not working. Let's just sell it to tourists. Ah, look what I got. Oh, so just look interesting, though. Covering the Statue of Liberty. Okay, listen, there was a trap in this assignment. There was a trick, and you guys took it like, uh right, what? In New York, I intentionally put New York in there to see if you guys would pay attention to it. Because because the funny thing is, this campaign is in New York. So why do we have to say new York. You know, it's kind of interesting. It's an interesting idea, because eventually there's gonna be some little tight. There's gonna be some little bird, you know. It's gonna be a line says don't Don't you know don't litter New York and then something official like a seal, or I love New York or something. So it's kind of interesting idea of like, Is it redundant? Just a question. I'll, uh, Patrick, I like this one. This is this is kind of groovy. I responded to this one from Paul. I don't like it. I responded to it because I'm you know, I'm, um I'm looking at this piece, going critically and saying, How can I make that better? Like So what do you What is this to you guys? What you looking at? Pitch in pigeon? Yes. It's more like a penguin to me. I mean, if you took this screen and turn it sideways, right, it would look like kind of a penguin going right now that he always leave means it's a picture. Okay. Oh, you know that He obviously means well, like I think we all know it's it is a picture of a pigeon. Not a Probably not a penguin. There aren't that many in New York unless you watch the movie Madagascar. Then there's eyes. This the bird from Twitter, the litter Twitter. Does that look like to a numbered? Because I will kick You didn't grow up around pigeons, so Okay. Whoa. Where do you live? That doesn't have pigeons. Kansas doesn't have pitching. You should take some of ours way. Have a lot. Okay, Probably a pigeon. One thing I One thing typographic Lee that I really don't care for. This is really this is kind of a weird idea for me to talk about is often typographic Lee. I see. I see this thing where designers will have they'll be like a photo of some guy with, and he's got one eye and an ear and you have to put type on it and you're like, Oh, it's just go limp. And I think that's the worst place in the world that available space, worst place in the world to put typography cause you're letting the photo push you around. You know, I understand why we do it. And then what's worse is like I got this typography climbing along this Bird's belly. I think that's kind of like the wrong ist place to do it, because I see three different things on the page and I would try to kind of simplify the whole thing, eliminate something from the page, like obviously, what's Obviously the typography is gonna be redundant on here if you do a good job anyway, right? So basically, you're gonna have, like, this poster that's going to say don't motor. And there's a logo, right? Theoretically. So the image is gonna carry the weight, or at least the image is gonna be compelling enough that you go. What? What the heck is that? And then you look at that and go Wow is the great French poster designer Cassandra Am Cassandra said a good poster enters through the eye and explodes in the brain. Right? So he's talking about a level of timing. So you see this thing and you just take it in aesthetically, visually, whatever. And then you go, Oh, Dane, that's awesome, right? So you draw, you draw somebody in with this beautiful or ugly or whatever, and then they read the thing and they're like, right? So I'm talking too much about this and my tell you my gut reaction, My gut reaction was I didn't even see it as a pigeon because I didn't I didn't make that connection first. I saw it as the bird of peace. A dove. And what is the double peace Usually carry the laurel. What if you what If you find a beautiful version of that, you know we're Picasso's or draw your own and then put some just ugly trash or cigarette butt or something. Or take that bird of that dove with the laurel and put the six pack plastic around it. You know? I mean, like, are you know, something beautiful again? Tell the truth. Tell the truth that happens. You know, we were talking about pigeons coming to New York. The pigeons air like pirates. They're like missing legs, you know, they're like this. They're like missing toes. Like, how are you holding on up there? You have no toes. Like, just don't tell me about it, man. Well, you know, that's the truth. It's a hard life. Um, truth again. How do we get to the truth? Where were you guys? Where it just goes. It's just not not you know. I see there's there's I like Teoh to communicate will use that word. But I will choose any channel possible intellectually, emotionally or through here. I don't care. You got a question. Also, the bird kind of looks like it's covered in oil. I think that's just kind of how it's drawn. Litter, litter, literal covered in oil is a whole different. That's an Exxon Valdez. That's a Louisiana thing. That's the whole thing. We got a bunch of these just saying years here. I want to have another huge thank you to everybody who submitted, though. That was fantastic. Thanks everyone out there. You know, it's not easy to get all those into that tight deadline. All the great work. You guys totally rocked it. I wish I could have talked about all of them. Thanks for being there, Guys. I love you.

Class Description


Short on time? This class is available HERE as a Fast Class, exclusively for Creator Pass subscribers.


An empowered designer is a truly creative designer. Let designer, author, artist, and activist, James Victore show you how to trust your instinct and embrace imperfection in Bold & Fearless Design.

When you follow the trends your ideas stagnate and you don’t create the kind of memorable pieces that get you noticed. Victore knows the antidote to that creative rut. Victore has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and is represented in the permanent collections of museums worldwide. His commercial work continues to wow by being sexy, strong, and memorable.

Learn how you can make work that is captivating and uniquely you by taking a behind-the-scenes look at this renowned designer’s method, thinking, and inspiration. Victore will talk about playing with different tools (not just digital ones) and rethinking the role of a designer. 

You’ll learn:

  • Exercises for generating concepts and design solutions
  • How to incorporate your hand into your work
  • Unexpected image-making tools and techniques
  • Software strategies for turning the analog into digital

Poster design inspiration is the perfect blank canvas for experimentation. Posters can be adapted for anything from a book covers to dinner plates. In this class, the poster format provides a launching point for discussing by-hand design and reimagining creative possibilities.

Don’t be boring. Watch Bold & Fearless Design with James Victore and energize your unique creative spark.

Reviews

Jephiner
 

I am not a graphic designer, I'm an artist, but this class translates beautifully. James' teaching style is nothing short of delicious - fresh, alive, fun, exciting - while being full of depth and poignant, valuable content, much of which transcends medium and brings value to any creative individual. I found particular value in the lessons around tools (and altering tools), the criteria for good work, the need to infuse your opinion into your work, the value of abandoning perfection, paying attention to cancer that is one's ego and that we are meant to be creators, and not 'the help'. More than anything else though, I benefited from being reminded, with such a burning passion, that we are not put on this earth to pay a mortgage and support a family, but to identify our true work and to bring it into existence in this world. So nice to reminded of something I know but forget on a regular basis. One of the best online classes I have ever taken - a real home run.

dlevans
 

I loved this course! Exceeded every notion I had. The design, concepts and principles were fun, funny and insightful. But James went so far beyond the "poster design" and into the philosophy, thinking, inspiration - huge! I am so glad I watched this course not only for the quick wit and fast humor (Jame's is smart! Sharp... And Really Funny - compliments his teaching and design), but the reading list he suggests, ways to nudge your creativity and the fashion with which he gets you thinking... Invaluable! Organic, Rich, Impact and message - this course has the design "how-to" covered, the real pearls are Jame's humble experience and generosity. Great Course... Oh, and check out his book! "Victore! or, Who Died and Made You Boss?" Inspiration and fun!

a Creativelive Student
 

Came to this course (and site) via Anna Dorfman's blog. Loved the motivational and philosophical aspects of the course. Very entertaining and inspirational. Also loved listening to Victore discuss his own work and process-- the stories of how he got specific ideas, tinkered with them, perfected them, etc.. As for the critiques of student and online work, I didn't find them very useful. I would love to see him pick out a few of the very best, and then give his own short and sweet-- and specific-- insights into how HE would improve them. Or just abandon the critiques entirely and instead show and discuss more of his own or other successful designers' work. Overall, fun and inspirational, with some helpful tips.