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Capturing and Processing Night Photography

Lesson 6 of 20

Light Painting: Equipment Overview

 

Capturing and Processing Night Photography

Lesson 6 of 20

Light Painting: Equipment Overview

 

Lesson Info

Light Painting: Equipment Overview

Alright everybody. So we found this great spot just below the bridge. We've got some really cool structures here: concretes, stairways, metal, and I think this is gonna be an awesome place to light paint. So we're gonna launch into another shot here, but before we do that, I just kinda wanna show you what I'm using as far as equipment goes. Now, the equipment that we're using here is pretty much just what we saw in our last shot, but we're gonna add a few things in. This is gonna be a really, super long exposure, maybe 30 seconds, a minute long, so we're gonna want our nice, sturdy tripod. Um, course we're gonna want a nice, sturdy tripod head. This is what marries the camera to the tripod, so it's super important. The next thing is, I've got my cable release. This way, if I'm going into minute, or two-minute, or four-minute long exposures, not quite sure what to expect. But if we do, I've got my cable release ready to go. Then, most importantly, is the light painting tools. I've got a...

couple of flashlights here. These are both coast flashlights, and I really love these. They're waterproof, they're super durable, and the beam is really, super smooth. Y'all maybe remember those old Eveready flashlights that had that really weird, kinda like, design in the center. This is perfectly smooth from top to bottom. And what that allows me to do, is as I'm light painting across smooth objects such as walls or things like that, it gives a nice, even look to the image. There's also beam control, zooming in and out, lots of advantages to these coast flashlights. I also have what's called the Luxli Viola here. And this is a great tool. What this allows me to have is a slightly broader beam. So unlike the narrow beam of a flashlight, this is gonna be quite a bit wider. I've got this little diffuser snoot here, and this is really cool, because it allows you to actually control the level of light. It can go really bright, really super dim, and this is the key. I can change the color of the light from warm to cool. So in a situation like this, we're going to have fairly warm skies because of the sodium vapor coming up from San Francisco. So it's gonna kinda look almost like an orange color, very similar to the color of the bridge, actually. And I may wanna marry that color together with a warm color in the foreground, I may wanna make it a little bit cooler, and so I can do that very easily with the Luxli Viola. And the way I can achieve that on my flashlights, is by using some gels. So most LED flashlights are fairly cool, and if you use 'em without any kind of gel, you get a fairly cool light. And I'll just throw this light out onto the scene here, and you can see how it is pretty cool or neutral in comparison to the sky. Now if I put on that gel, you can see how warm that light gets. So I'm gonna try several different things, and we're just gonna see what turns out from our experimentation.

Class Description

Creating night images poses unique challenges, particularly for those who are more accustomed to daytime photography. From focusing in the dark to calculating long exposures, night photography requires the photographer to build new skills and polish off some old ones. But there’s more to night photography than just capturing the image in the field. Like with other photographic disciplines, post-processing often plays a vital role in crafting the final image. Join photographer, author and National Parks at Night instructor Tim Cooper as he shares what you’ll need to know while you’re in the field, including lens choice, camera settings and exposure, as well as how to use Adobe® Photoshop® and Adobe® Lightroom® to create a night image that dazzles.


SOFTWARE USED:

Adobe Photoshop CC 2018, Adobe Lightroom Classic CC

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