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From Shoot Through Photo Editing: Creating a Double Exposure in Photoshop

Lesson 5 of 8

Shooting Portrait of a Daughter for Double Exposure

 

From Shoot Through Photo Editing: Creating a Double Exposure in Photoshop

Lesson 5 of 8

Shooting Portrait of a Daughter for Double Exposure

 

Lesson Info

Shooting Portrait of a Daughter for Double Exposure

All right, So we're gonna be shooting a couple of different angles. We're gonna have you start off with sitting in the same ways, Mom. Cool. And then I might have used which the other way as well. Eso We'll start off with this for a few minutes and then basically, yeah, basically, just do the exact same thing. No. Yeah, totally natural. Try to look like your mother like I can't help it. I do anyway. All right. Cool. That's awesome. Maybe a little slower. Mackenzie, if you know one. These are so cool. All I didn't even think about your cool hair color to It looks so cool in the blue lights. Yeah, you're doing great. This is gonna be such a cool shot. I'm really excited about it. It's cool when these things, like, kind of come together and you have no idea, like if they're gonna work, all right, because we can take, like, a two second break. We'll just look at the shots. Um, when you have an idea like this and this was like, um, you know, honestly, like, as of yesterday afternoon, I was ...

actually planning on photographing these with, like, strobes with like a soft box, like totally standard. And then, like it was last night in my hotel room when I was like, You know what? We already have one like that. The fern one is going to be like your standard strove. And I was like, Let's get something a little bit more artistic, a little something more abstract. And this was like, last night and obviously, like no pre production, and I had no idea what these would look like. And maybe I'm on live a live broadcast. So maybe that was, you know, making my own job a little bit harder for me. But I think, you know, part of that is, like, you know, testing things out and doing things that, like, you're not exactly sure like that. I don't know. Personally, I really love stuff like this. That is not like a super tack sharp portrait. I love stuff that's a little bit more artistic. Um, I can't wait to combine these together. Yeah, they're already looking super cool. Um, all right, let's take a couple more, and then we're gonna have you switched directions so we can make it look as though you guys air back to back there. Alright. Ready, Mackenzie. Alright, cool. Go for it. All right, all right. And I'm gonna have you tried to stand real still for me, if you can look towards the camera for me. Cool. We got some still shots here is well, we can kind of combine those together with some of our movement shots if we need to do that as well. All right, Let's have you switched directions. And then I'm going to do the same thing with Mom, actually, because I just just kind of like in the process of this, it's like, OK, well, these still shots if I want to lower the opacity of this and then combine that with a blurred shot, then we can have both of those. So I'm gonna bring Mom back in just a minute. But if you can basically just do the same thing, be awesome. All right, spend a little more time looking at the camera, if you don't mind. Beautiful. All right. And a few stills towards the camera. Alright. Awesome job. Cool. All right. Good job. We're gonna Thanks. Mackenzie. Um that would you mind coming back in? We're going to do the same thing with you here. I'm gonna get some stills of you looking in this direction if you don't mind. And then some stills in that direction. And then some movements also. Cool. All right, there we go. And come on towards the look towards the camera, if you don't mind. Beautiful. And then All right, let's switch it around the other way. Perfect. We'll start off with some stills. Kind of looking towards the camera here. Look out that we're just a little bit more. And then back when we with your eyes very nice. Very nice. Then couldn't we do some motion shots as well with you? Kind of like going back and forth, they're cool and kind of pause there for a second coop and then back back again, All right? And come back over again and paused for me. Beautiful. All right, good job. So we're shooting plenty assets that we can then combined together in photo shop, just to make sure we get exactly what we need for both of the shots and notice. We had both of the subjects sitting in sitting in either direction with the light so I can now in photo shop. I can make it look like their face to face. I could look like they're back to back. I can mirror the lighting, or I could make the lighting consistent. So I have a ton to work with now in post production, which is exactly what you want whenever you do this. All right. Good job. Thank you. Okay. Cool Is that pretty much wraps up our shoot. Guys, we've got a bunch of different elements. We've got a beautiful portrait of Alex to start whip and some images of ferns that we're gonna be combining together Internet section. And we've got mother and daughter as well. So, Aaron, we have some time for a question. So if you have any questions here in the studio audience, but could you just take a step back and explain again? This is from photo maker. What is the difference between a double exposure and a composite? That's a good question. So a traditional double exposure is done in camera using film. Now, a digital double exposure is the composite image. Right? Because you you can't take a double exposure using a digital camera. Although actually, I think someone icons will do that? Is that right? Yeah. Okay. I don't think Canon will do that. So a traditional double exposure, basically, you take a picture and you set your ice. So let's say if you're shooting I So speed 400 you would set your isil on your camera. Two would be 800. Yeah, you should set it to 800. So would technically only expose halfway with your first picture. And then when you shoot it again, it would expose the second time around so you would get both of those exposures. That lineup, you have two different pictures that would create one exposure. So, you know, actually done on film. That's like, you know, if you guys are serious about shooting double exposure like the rial way, I would definitely suggest getting a film camera charity it in that way because it's it's far less predictable. It's a lot more like riel than something like that. What we're doing here now, when you're shooting with digital, basically you've got two different exposures, and you're gonna be combining them together. So that is a composite image. Any time when you have multiple different digital files and you bring them together. It is a composite. So at this point, it's basically like style is what we're focusing on, um, imitating the look of what would happen in film using digital. So it is both a double exposure and the composite when you're shooting with digital. Thank you. And so when? Now that we're in terms of using digital that in versus the using film for this double exposure is there a concerns around how you have to pick your exposure and settings and such in this scenario? Yeah, good question. Okay, so what did with film again, like you basically exposed halfway you the first time and then the rest of the way, the second time. Now, using digital, you have tools that will allow you to adjust the opacity of either exposure. You can also use layer masks. You have a lot more tools. So my recommendation would be get to like, perfect. Don't try to expose either one halfway that that's not gonna work for digital. You want to make sure you get to perfect exposures and then you can use masking and blending modes to get those to blend together in post production. Good question. Exactly that that question had a lot of votes on here and sort of trying to figure that out in terms of how you expose. Because if you have done those double exposures in the past, it's a different way of thinking. It's completely different. Yeah. Good question. Do you have any questions here in the studio audience? So, a question to come in from Jasmine Hughes. Is it possible to create such effects without using studio lighting? Definitely. Oh, yeah, for sure. I mean, in this case, basically, you know what? I'm actually gonna turn these off because they're going to start melting our strokes here. Um, but in this case, basically, I'm just using the modeling lamps. Now, these air, you know, like fancy studio heads, these air pro foto de ones. Um, and they have flash capabilities. But I'm in this case I was using using the modeling lights, which is basically just a light bulb. Uh, probably like 100 or 250. What light bulbs and that I don't know exactly what they are, but, um, you can go toe like a hardware store and pick up, you know, just a regular like clamp light. There are actually some of those, like, right on this back wall. I don't know if we're able to bring that camera back that way. Sorry, that might be a pain there, but a lot of these air just like you. No lights that you can get it like, ah, hardware store where they're just, like clamp lights. You could put like, 100 or 200 watt bulb in those and light your subject with that. So, you know, 100 years ago, they weren't using, like, fancy flash tubes and whatnot. They were using, like either natural available light, or like tungsten lights and things like that. So you can most definitely use just about any light source to create an image. Um, the nice thing about flash is you'll be able to freeze motion if you need to, because they the flash duration is really short. You can also put out a lot of light. So if you want to, like, overpower the sun, you can do that. Or if you want to shoot, you know, in a bright room and still have, like, dark shadows on your subject, you can do that as well. So the flashes will put out a lot more light than these things. But, um, you can most definitely use just about it. I mean, you can use a flashlight and create beautiful portrait, so that too. So good question. We can bring the house lights back up. Sorry. I forgot to mention that. Questions in here. You have a question? Bread? Yeah, Just kind of going back to our first shoot that we did this morning with the with the ferns and the hair. And he will be combining those, um, we mentioned some modifiers, and I know we were just using basic kind of can reflectors this morning, But you mentioned things like grids. We didn't talk too much about snoops, but I think that when we're really focusing on the hair like that, it might be valuable for people to know more. I mean, I'm kind of I've never used notes in my own personal, and I'm wondering if that would have been a good application for that, too. Yeah, for sure. So a snoot is basically, like, think of like, uh, paper towel tube, you know, stuck on the front of a light like a a cylinder there. So a snoot basically directs light into, like one, like, very small beam of light. So if I had a light here with a snood on it, I could basically pointed, and it would only light up the hair of our subject. Also, a grid, You know, a regular, uh, dish like this. You know, you've got, like, a huge spread, like, 90 degrees, and you can get, like, 40 degree grids, 30 2010 degree grids as well, and those will focus in a beam of light. So, um, that's if you have grids or snoops and things like that at your disposal, and you want to focus into being would like to like a very specific place grid Zahra. Really good tool in this case. Didn't have any grid laying around, so just kind of pointed light up in a direction so it wouldn't hit this part of our subject that we wanted. Yeah, definitely. Don't let the amount of gear you have Limit your imagination, rich. Look at that. The more you know

Class Description


Creating one interesting image out of two or more requires good composition, lighting, and an eye for which images will work together to tell a compelling story. Aaron Nace will walk you through this process, and show you how to create double exposure images from shoot through post. You'll learn how to shoot textures that work well with a silhouetted portrait, and how to combine photos of two people to make an artistic image. Learn Aaron's tips for combining images efficiently with blending modes, layer masks, and advanced blending options.  


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2015.1.2

Reviews

Pamela Richardson
 

I LOVED Aaron's presentation style, his wonderful humour, his gentleness and humility, his creative eye, and his extensive skills with both the camera and with Photoshop. I learned a great deal from this class, and highly recommend it. It was both fun to watch, and very informative. Aaron's friendly and casual presentation style was a delight, and helped to make a very complex subject seem quite approachable. I appreciated his willingness to share his knowledge with his viewers. I understand that it is a huge challenge to create something in front of a live audience, and maintain composure, but he managed it. Aaron's use of motion-blurred images of the mother and daughter for the composite was just very creative, and was something that would never have occurred to me. I also watched Aaron's compositing class on Feb 22, which was truly remarkable. He paid close attention to every fine detail in the scene that he was creating through compositing, including size and color tone of the light source, scale, perspective, and every last detail of the shadows to make a believable and magical image! He was very good in directing and encouraging his models during the shoot on both days, and very courteous with all the assistants. I have been involved with photography on a semi-professional level for almost 40 years, and have been doing photo editing with Adobe and Corel products since 2002.

AmandaReese
 

Super inspiring, great class!