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Designing Kitchen Icons in Adobe Illustrator

Lesson 4 of 9

Simple Drop & Slip Shadows & Highlights

 

Designing Kitchen Icons in Adobe Illustrator

Lesson 4 of 9

Simple Drop & Slip Shadows & Highlights

 

Lesson Info

Simple Drop & Slip Shadows & Highlights

a lot of great items coming up here. Get it'll, Toaster Got a waffle iron, a person, All that. Now, as you go through here, these air fairly flat icons. So one of the things I absolutely love to dio is I love to add dimension to these as well. Now a couple things when I'm building icons, I want to make sure that everything has the same look and feel, which is one of the reasons why I set up all my style's. The other thing is, as I always want to dio either all two dimensional or all three dimensional. I don't want to mix dimensions when I'm doing things. If I start doing dimensional items that everything has to be because people will say, Oh, yeah, I really like this pot. But, you know, I'd like to show some dimension here, So I go in and I kind of curve the top of this pot here. And then I would like Teoh and take this and copy this and paste it and then rotate this and put it on top of my pot here to kind of show, you know, dimension. But then you gotta make the dimension here and it...

's like, you know, that doesn't really work. So if I want to show to mention on things, I do highlights or we could do slip shadows. One of my favorite things Highlight noodles we've ever heard. Highlight noodles. This is awesome. Highlight noodle is where you can go and put a highlight on absolutely anything. I've got my water droplet or my egg or my orange or whatever it may be, I want to dio Ah, highlight noodle and highlight Noodle is going in and I use my arc tool and I'm going to go and I'm going to make that a five millimeter line with hot dog ends. But I'm gonna make it white like so And that is my highlight Noodle. I'm going to save that as a graphic style. And that's my highlight noodle right there. And it doesn't have to be curved. It could be straight. So this allows me to go in and add dimensions to things without actually making it three d. And you can see I did this on the little bowl of noodles over here as it steaming right there. But with any of these items, I can throw in a highlight noodle. You want to add a little bit of fun to it. So something like this with a cup, I'd like Ah, highlight noodle on the side. And if I go in with my line tool, I'll be able to go in, and thankfully, it snaps to the grid. So I don't have to get the angle of my cup just the same as the angle of my line because I used a grid and I got my highlight noodle and it goes in and does that great little highlight noodle right there. Awesome. And now we have a little bit of depth and dimension with our object. If I'd like to go in and add anything Teoh like, say, this nice little curved area or I would like to do ah, highlight noodle that mimics this area right here. So it comes in and goes over. I can do a couple different things. I could go in and I could draw my highlight noodle here. And then I would draw another highlight noodle here, and then I would have to go with my Pathfinder and then merge them all together. And that's fine. But I could also take and just copy a corner point here, copy that and paste it to get my entire highlight corner. And then I could go and move those in a swell so that I could capture the look and feel and get that is all one unit if I want to throw that in there as well. Either way, this becomes to pieces or just simply copy this and I shortened those sides up to make that as well. So highlight noodles are absolutely awesome. We may also want to do something with these icons that give it a little bit more character. So right now, these are all fairly empty. But if I wanted my wine glass to show that there is wine inside there something like that, I'd like to create a shape that sits inside of my object. So trying to go in and scale something down in size and make it fit this shape could be a little bit tricky. So I'm gonna select my shape, go under the object menu and under the path, and I'm going to go in and I'm gonna offset the path and offsetting the path allows me to take my shape and allows me to make it larger or smaller, but keeping everything in proportion with that shape. So what I'm going to do is I'm gonna offset the path in here so that it creates a shape that mimics my shape. And in this case, I'm going to fill it with black. Or I could go in. I could fill it with shades of grey so that I get something that gives me that look and feel. If I wanted to shorten this, I could put a box over the top of it, select both my object in the box, subtract the front, and now I have a perfectly formed shape that matches exactly. And that's the way I can create fills and side of things works really good. In a lot of cases. I can't just go in and reduce the size down because it doesn't fit symmetrically. So if I wanted to do something like that that I could dio that would work out really well if I wanted to do something like this inside the bottle. And I just took my bottle shape and I reduced down the shape of my bottle and I filled it with black, and I put it in there. You'll see it. It doesn't fit at all. It just doesn't work. So if I take this shape, object path offset path and I make it smaller in here and just reduce it down, this will create a perfectly sized shape inside there that I could then go in and fill with any color from my color panel and put that in there and create a space inside there that is perfectly in line with my shape. I can do that with anything. Makes it really nice. So I could fill that and make sure that obviously these would have the same distance between them as well. Why not? All part of the fun? Yeah, absolutely. Nana, Of course he asked if he commits. Certainly. Yeah. I mean, in a banana is just around it. Hot dog, right? Absolutely. So, I mean, if you're gonna make a hot dog, what's more easy than making a hot dog, then going in and literally making a hot dog? That's just, you know, a little bit more hot doggy right there. Then, of course, you could take your curvature tool and you could curve a little bit. And now you've got, like, sausage or a hot dog right there. And, of course, how do you make it actually look like a sausage? Well, you go in with your polygon tool on you, draw yourself a little triangle like so, and then you rotate the triangle so that you got your little sausage ends right there and look at that. Are you have a balloon now? Banana? Melon? Banana isn't much different than this, I can tell you that. So if you want to go in and create a banana, we could go in and have a little bit more fun with this, we could go in. We could actually create a curve starting off. You want to do that? Kind of a little odd when you get the stroke, Let's just go in and we're just gonna do a normal line right here. I'm gonna just do a line. That's hot dog right there and we want to do a banana. So one of the things of the banana is that it tapers well, this is a line. So really, all I have is the ability to go ahead and set the stroke weight of the line uniformly, but I want to go in, and I would like to taper the line so that it gets wider at one end and narrow with the other. So if you've never used the width shaped tool, which I commonly called the chicken skewer tool because it looks like a chicken with a skewer through it, does it not? Of course it does. That's what it is. It's the chicken skewer tool. And if I use the chicken skewer tool, this allows me to click anywhere on my path. And this allows me to go in and narrow up my actual stroke. So this takes the stroke and it tapers it. And you may have noticed up here when you go next, the stroke panel. They have all these weird shapes, these air, actually with profiles that are done with our with shape tool, a k a. The chicken skewer tool. So if I do this, I can taper a line so that it's wider at one end and nearer, worth the other and any point within so I could go ahead and taper this. So if I want, like a measuring spoon, get out. Oh my Gosh, a measuring spoon. You put a hole in there, so we're gonna leave it at that because we're gonna go over here and we're gonna still work on our banana because you put a little hole in there. Is that not the perfect measuring spoon? I mean, great. These things just happen, folks. There was no planning whatsoever with this. If I want to do the banana, gonna go back to my with shaped tool and I can pull this back out. And this And then I could use my curvature tool here to kind of curve that just a little bit right there. And actually, it's looking more like a pickle, isn't it? Oh, my gosh. You could do a pickle as well, Chili. Good grief. You know, we could never get past this. And if I wanted to have a nice little curve here, I could put a little curved tail on that and then rotate that in place. I don't think banana is turning out exactly the way I wanted a banana turn turn out. But I have made a really nice chilly. This is what happens. So I'm gonna go in and I got my hot dog ends. Okay, so I just created a really nice chilly. Okay, so we'll let you go and figure out the banana, because in the meantime, we got a sausage. We gotta measuring spoon and a chili as well. Okay, We're getting dangerously close to a banana, but I can't leave my measuring spoon alone. I need to put that little hole in the end. Oh, my gosh. Look at that. My nice little orange highlight right there. I dropped that in, but that right in the middle gonna turn off my snap to grid here because I can't quite get it right in the place that I want. Teoh, I'm going to fill this with White, and I have Hi. Nice little hole for the measuring spoon turning off the grid. So, Aiken, center that there we go a bit too small. Perfect. Measuring spoon

Class Description

Icons have the ability to convey a lot of information in a single graphic. If you need a custom icon and have Adobe Illustrator, this class is for you. Adobe certified instructor Jason Hoppe will take you through the icon creating process and demonstrate this by creating a set of over twenty icons around a central theme.

Topics include:

  • Using a Grid structure for alignment
  • Setting up Object Styles
  • Using the Scale Stroke options for consistency
  • Alignment and Spacing tips
  • Create simple yet effective drop/slip shadows and great highlights
  • Best ways to save/export icons for the best display and use


Software Used: Adobe Illustrator CC 2017

Reviews

Tomas Verver
 

I like Jason's teachingstyle. Nice to see that just using symple shapes and a few trucs can help you make icons.

Eileen
 

I learned some nifty techniques! For example, how to easily change sharp corners to round ones, and how to subtract simple shapes from each other and use them as building blocks to create icons.