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Ecommerce and Accepting Payments on WordPress

Lesson 2 of 20

How We Accept PaymentSelling on WordPress: On-Site VS Off-site

 

Ecommerce and Accepting Payments on WordPress

Lesson 2 of 20

How We Accept PaymentSelling on WordPress: On-Site VS Off-site

 

Lesson Info

How We Accept PaymentSelling on WordPress: On-Site VS Off-site

right now, the next thing I want to talk about is on site versus offsite payments. And this is one of the another pdf that I have here. Let me let me get over to that offsite versus on site payments. I should probably flip that around, cause on sites easier now, what is What does that mean? You're probably gonna hear this term, and you're gonna You've already heard me talk about, like, PayPal and Amazon and woo commerce and all this stuff. Why are there so many solutions and why do Why do we care? Okay, so here's the thing. There are two methods to major methods, and these are kind of generic, but we have off site and on site off site simply means that you don't want to take on the burden of setting up all these different things. I talked about the security for SSL or other methods of doing that. The merchant accounts setting up the actual you know, plug in maybe. OK, working with a plug in to sell something a shopping cart. If you've heard that before, this is something you don't have...

to deal with. An offsite Payments simply means that you're gonna take somebody from your site, they're gonna click a button and maybe go to paper. That's what an offside payments all about. Okay, The heavy lifting is done by that third party by the other company. Now the thing about offsite payments to me and you can actually see some examples here I have PayPal. Amazon payments, their stripe that there's a 1,000, of them out there. And there's Mawr that probably in the next three days that I talk about this. It's gonna come up. I'm sure seems like a new one comes out every day. But there's things to think about here with this offsite type of selling. Okay, pros and cons if you do an off site. In other words, if you have a button and they click it and they go to PayPal, for instance, some of the pros it's easy. It's really easy. OK, you can just go up to pay, PAL. Make a little button up there to get a little code. You can also use a WordPress plug in something like that. Plug it in picks and options, tell how much you want to sell it for, and it throws a button on the page and you got it. Basically. OK, now you're not controlling the process. Once that happens, though, there's no headaches with payment processors. You just get it done. You just send them over to that third party and they deal with it all over there. There. This is another thing that I'm kind of sneaking in here, and I'm just kinda introducing here. But there are fees, okay? Don't don't think that because we're selling something when we go through the work of putting in the plug in and installing WordPress doing all this stuff to get it set up that we don't have to pay someone else. Every time we buy something every time somebody else by something, you're gonna find that when you do this, you gotta look at the fees they're called. It's just it's like credit card feats. Okay, We have a percentage based on sales. We also have maybe a dollar amount or so for every sale you make or somebody every purchase somebody makes it some point. Somebody is probably gonna be taking some money out of what you sell just because they're doing the heavy lifting. Okay, now, this is usually gonna drive people to decide. Do I want to use PayPal? Do you want to use Amazon? Do I want to use striped? You want to use all these different kinds. They will go and look at all the different fees associated and say, Well, this one's cheaper. That one's more expensive. And then they're gonna look and see what they get for that money. Okay, so that's something you gotta think about. Fees are usually straightforward. Pretty simple. Usually any issues that happened when the processing goes okay and somebody buys and maybe they want a refund. Or maybe, you know they need to change in address or do something like that. That's not on you. That's on the payment processor side. That's that's on the third party side. Let's say pay, pal. I know I keep going back to that. OK, but there's Amazon payments, etcetera. That's their issue, if you will. Now, if somebody wants this could actually be part of the condo. I want to introduce these because if you're thinking about the pros near like, Okay, all button, go to PayPal. Easy. Wow. Simple. But there are constants, pecans, little flexibility. The idea here is that I want to be able to create this awesome looking thing that's gonna match my site perfectly. You're gonna find that some of these processors will not let you change like the button. Okay, it'll look like a PayPal button. People will let you change it, but you can't add certain features in certain details. Maybe like a product description. You've got to do that yourself. Okay? There's certain things that you don't have a lot of flexibility with. Another thing is that, like I said, the design can be controlled in certain cases. Okay, you're just gonna take this thing, plug it into your site. And I've seen a lot of sites where you see this, this design, everything's color matched and other things. LA. And then suddenly you see like a box, and it looks like 1/3 party site or something. Okay, that's the idea that it's actually coming from somewhere else. And sometimes it's hard to control the design. There's very few options already mentioned that, and it may actually be jarring for the customer. This honestly, as a con, it's something you really need to think about, because if somebody's on your site, and they're going through this cool site to do their thing. They're like, I'm gonna buy T shirt, they click on the button, and suddenly there wist off to another site Completely different looking. And maybe your site closes the site. Replaced your page to get back to your site. Could be a little challenging. Okay, Like I said, people that don't know the process don't know what's actually happening behind the scenes. This could be joined. So this is something that we have to think about. And in just a little while here, I'm going to kind of show you more examples off an offsite versus an on site. This is off site sewing Now, what about on site selling? What does that mean? Well, on site selling means that you control the process. You go through and you set up this secure thing. This SSL you set up this merchant account. You kind of do a lot of this stuff to get it to work. Okay, um, the idea behind this is that it's this is more of a shopping cart, as we know. Okay, you can hear like the wu commerce plugging is more on site. That data is stored. Typically, things like user Loggins. Different information center is stored in your database or the database on your site. A couple examples. Here you can see the group commerce. There's a 1,000,000 of Mount their shopping cart we have. I've used Zen cart X cart. There's a bunch of them out there, but these air full on shopping card systems that integrate right into your site. These are more complex for sure. Okay, let's talk about pros and cons here so far is doing it all on your site. Okay, so the idea is that they stay on your site, you don't click a button and leave. They're there and they have the cart. You know, they go through, save you cart. Let's check out. Let's do all this. They enter the credit card info usually, and when they go to click to buy, it's gonna go out to that merchant account or the merchant processor. Process the payment and kind of get it done. Some of the pros here tons of flexibility. If you want to go this route and you want to use a big plug in, you want to use a big shopping cart you can do whatever you want. It's a matter of fact. Back in the day when I used to create carts and put them in my sights, we could actually what's called Skin them. Okay? And that sounds disgusting. But you can control the look and feel of whatever you put in your sight because you have the code. You basically own it all. Okay, You can also pick your payment processor doing this. This is pretty cool. It's a great way to be able to say, you know what? I found an awesome fee. Awesome rate with this, you know, service like authorized on net or whatever it happens to be. And I want to use them so I can say, Let's hook up my shopping cart to authorize .net who's gonna actually take the credit cards and process him and give me the money, basically, so we can kind of pick that. There's also no jarring switch to another site. It's just there on the site. They look at the card, they have their log in, they have all the information right there, and it's all the same. Seamless process, if you will. That's to me. That's like best case. That's awesome. They're all right there. But some of the const this is to think about There's a lot more to deal with. A lot more to deal with because you are the one. If you're doing this, unless you hire someone you gotta worry about, you know, does it actually work? Are the payments going through our people getting people getting emails? Is it all happening? Ssh. Something like a security method as the stage being one of these methods. This is something we probably have to deal with ourselves by getting installed. We gotta have a payment gateway. Unless you use another company that could do this for you. Okay, We talked a little bit about that processing the credit cards and more set up. If something goes wrong, guess whose fault it is. It's either you or the person you paid, which is ultimately you. OK, so these are things that we we have to as well think about on site versus offsite payments

Class Description

It’s one thing to get a WordPress website up and running, it's another to sell from it. In Ecommerce and Accepting Payments on WordPress, Brian Wood will teach you everything you need to know about setting up your website to sell products. 

Brian has been training designers and business owners on how to build and grow an awesome, professional web presence for years. In this class, he’ll give you a complete introduction to your options for selling through your WordPress site. 

You’ll learn about:  

  • "On-site" vs "off-site" payments 
  • Accepting PayPal, Google Wallet, Amazon Payments, and more 
  • Customizing your shopping cart 
  • Exploring and installing WooCommerce 
You’ll develop a better understanding of the different methods for selling on a WordPress site and find out which one is best suited to your specific needs. There are so many options for selling goods online – find out which is right for you in Ecommerce and Accepting Payments on WordPress with Brian Wood.


Software Used: Wordpress 4.1

Reviews

Danielle Allen
 

I appreciate all of the knowledge that Brian offers. He has a wealth of knowledge, however he tends to "jump around" while speaking on a topic. For example, during the PayPal section, he spends more time speaking about other sites instead of just delivering the content. This made it a bit harder for me to follow along. I actually became frustrated. Overall, the course is useful but in the future, I recommend that he look at the topics and ensure that he sticks to the information we actually need.