Skip to main content

In Camera Multiple & Double Exposure

Lesson 6 from: FAST CLASS: Creating Painterly Photographs

Kathleen Clemons

In Camera Multiple & Double Exposure

Lesson 6 from: FAST CLASS: Creating Painterly Photographs

Kathleen Clemons

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

6. In Camera Multiple & Double Exposure

Lesson Info

In Camera Multiple & Double Exposure

for double exposure, which is what this is you could do to different subjects. In this instance, I took a photo of some pants, um, trees, and then I combined it in in camera with a photo of some nearby leaves. But I generally I'm doing two versions of one subject for paint. Really. Look, instead of two subjects combining, I'm doing two versions, one subject. So here is a rose at F 13. It's a beautiful rose, So I took one shot of the rose as is, and then I totally de focused so that all I got was just orange color. And that's the effect. So I went from a straight shot to a very soft, painterly look with the same camera. Same set up on everything. Here's another one where I did the same thing so you can see the two of them together. You can see the effect off the double exposure, and you may prefer one or the other. That's fine, but a veil of that veil of color covers the whole the whole photo. So here I combined this bud, which I thought was beautiful, but I wasn't crazy about the backg...

round, so it's got darks and lights, and I wasn't crazy about that. And I saw this amazing plant next to it, which is really busy. But when I d focused that plant, I got that. So when I combine them, I got the image on the left, which is much softer, more painterly. And then that was just another another little branch on the plants. Ivan did the same thing with this dog would one in focus one totally de focused and the same thing with these firms. And then the Queen Anne's lace on the left, I did one and focus one out. But for the calla lily, I wanted to try something different. So I did one in focus. And instead of going totally out of focus, I just changed how close I waas so that I made it a little bit bigger and let them be combined right in camera. Just a fun, fun technique. So you really need to check your manual to see if you can do in camera multiple exposure. If not, you could do it in Photoshop, and we're gonna be talking a little bit about that this afternoon. So I set my camera to multiple mode. Five images for that. And here's the back of my camera. I've got it on continuous shooting. If you wanted to just set your camera so it only took one shot and that and you went back to normal shooting. You could do that. My exposures are averaged. I usually choose an odd number five or three or what I use most. You can save your source images if you wanted to play with them in Photoshop after I don't do that and I haven't set for continuous. And all this is is just taking five. That might even have been seven shots where I take a shot, move my camera little bit, Take a shot, move it, move it and a circular pattern. And I did the same thing for this magnolia for these rude Becca, and this is a little bit of more of a gentle image. I used a lens baby with probably only three turns of the camera, so I can go from this these air snapdragons before you're looking for lots of color and shapes for this technique, and here's my multiple exposure of it. This is great. When you have flowers that still have a lot of color, but they're not in great shape. They're not in great condition because you can't tell. Yes. How many times are how many different variations of these things perhaps are you going through as you're trying these fun things as faras, we'll just the different multiple exposures. The are you Do you see the vision of what you want to create, or are you just playing? Um, generally, when I see something like this, I think multiple exposure, you know, it really depends on what I'm seeing. And a lot of this comes down to sometimes me being bored, my friends already done. And I'm like, I'm you know, my friends are not done rather, and I'm done. And I'm like, What am I gonna dio do some multiple exposure? You know what? I'm just trying to keep myself entertained some of the time, So, yeah, sometimes I don't think of it ahead of time. And sometimes I dio this is just a straight shot of dogwood and then a multiple exposure version and another. And then I took this one step further. The last time I did it, I just started playing with I did five exposures, but the last one, I totally de focused. And so I ended up with a veil of color on top of my multiple exposure. So I did four of the turns. And then for the last shot, I just de focused. So there's that veil of color that I seem to be quite a fan off. Same thing with this shot. Same technique on that one as well, and not just flowers. Thes air stares at the Japanese gardens in Portland. I just rotated the camera for three. And here's the shot that I did at the Done Gardens, and I'd like to show you how I did that. You can watch me make a multiple exposure. I want to show you how I do multiple exposure in camera. Canon five D Mark three allows me to do that. You should check your manual and see if you can do it with your camera. If you can't, you can combine exposures in post processing, which will be talking about later. The reason that I bought my five d Mark three was because I had Nikon envy, because Nikon has allowed you to do this for a while, So when I'm doing multiple exposure, I generally choose an odd number of exposures to combine three and five or what I used most often. And I choose a subject that has a lot of subject in a small area, a lot of color, a lot of shape, a lot of line to really get a painterly look. So I've chosen pans ease to demo the technique for you today, and I'm going to do that with five exposures. So what I'm going to do is set my focus, point over to the right a little bit off center and focus on one pansy. And with each exposure, I'm going to tilt my camera slightly to the left click Click click, each time rotating in a little bit, and you don't have to move your camera in a swirl pattern. You can move up and down. You could move sideways. That's totally up to you, But I think for the pans ease, it will look really nice with a swirl of color. So I'm going to do that now. Yeah, and I did use auto focus for that. It worked well with this subject if it's not working and you find that your cameras seeking, then go back to manual focus. But it worked perfectly here

Ratings and Reviews

Krystyna
 

I really liked it, it was inspiring and clear. I need more courses like this...

Phillip Ziegler
 

Wonderful teacher and a well presented course--both this short version and the long one

Student Work

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES