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Vertical/Horizontal Panning in Photoshop

Lesson 8 from: FAST CLASS: Creating Painterly Photographs

Kathleen Clemons

Vertical/Horizontal Panning in Photoshop

Lesson 8 from: FAST CLASS: Creating Painterly Photographs

Kathleen Clemons

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Lesson Info

8. Vertical/Horizontal Panning in Photoshop

Lesson Info

Vertical/Horizontal Panning in Photoshop

first thing that I want to show you in Photoshop is how to apply motion blur right in Photoshop. So the way that I came up with this technique actually is because I had gone out shooting and I had taken a photo of some amazing trees with great spaces. And I thought, Why didn't I vertical pan that at the same time? You know, I thought I wonder if I could do that in Photoshop. So I started playing around, and yes, you can. So let's open this one. Okay, so these are some trees that I shot at a Katya and I shot them because of the contrast between the cold, curly branches with some beautiful color in the back. But I thought that I also wished that I had done a vertical pan of this one. So let me show you how I do that. So the first thing that I'm always going to do is make a new layer. And on a Mac, that is command J get my layers open. Mhm. I could move this over. Okay, then I'm going to go up to filter blur groups motion blur. And right now it's set for a horizontal motion. So I'm gonna ...

change that. You could also just enter degrees. I'm going to change that. I'm gonna go to right around probably 200 pixels and you can start to see a change. So now I have a vertical pan right in Photoshop. And if I feel like that's too much, I can come over to the opacity of it and tone that back down. You see how the branches came back? Let's go to full again. And if I pull that down, I start to get those fine branches, and that was part of what caught my eye. So I would probably want to keep those right in the shot. You can also try different blending modes. Let's pull that back to full capacity and instead of normal, see what lighten looks like for totally different painterly effect. So, um, with this technique, I use lighten a lot, actually, um, or normal, But experiment with them with all of the modes. So very, very simple way to take a shot that you really loved the lines off and see it in a different way. So we're not gonna say that. Let's try it on another photo? Yes. Okay, there's a line up of red trees in the fall that I also shot at a Katya. So let's open this one, and I'm also going to start with a new layer. The reason. My layers keep disappearing and then go to filter, blur motion blur. And this time it's still set in the direction from the last time I used it. It's about 1 97. I think that's probably good. Try a little more and see E. Think closer to 200 was good and say, Okay, now let's say that you wanted to bring you thought that the bark on that front tree was just amazing and that you wanted to bring it back a little bit. You could make a layer mask, come over and click on the layer mask icon, and you're going to use black and choose your brush. And I wouldn't be removing this technique where the blur at 100% capacity, it's gonna look very funky. Let's go down to a small opacity and a small brush, and you could just start painting back in some of that texture. Can you go up to a little more than that. You see that start to come back in now. And if you wanted, you could do that on all the trees or less is you went further back. Let's give you a better look at that. You see how I brought that back in So and that would be your personal choice if you wanted to bring that back or just leave that as, uh, as more of a true panning. Look, that's your artistic license that I gave you. Take that right out and and you make the decision. But you don't only need to do this vertically. Let's try a horizontal pan in Photoshop, so let's open it. It's trying to make these bigger out here. Let's go to 30. It's a little too big. Okay, again, Command J. I want a new layer filter blur. Motion blur. This time I don't want vertical blur. One horizontal blur. You see what that did to the water? Let's look it really smooth, the water out a lot, so let's go even a little bit more with that, and with this one, I definitely want to bring back some of some of the boats, get that to fit here. Um, because I think they just kind of look like blobs as is. So if I go to my layers Uh huh. Well, it did not. Where is my layer? Start that again. All right. Uh huh. Open J. There's my layer. All right. Back to filter color motion. Blur. 2 48. Say Okay, now let's make a layer mask, grab my brush, and I'm gonna need a bigger one for this and start painting roughly. I mean, I don't want anything real precise here, but I just want to bring back a little more detail in those boats and probably these traps up here a swell. You can go over it twice if you want a little bit more or certain areas of it. But I think that is just a more interesting shot. It makes me think of Have you seen that? A lot of people have done the gondola's in Venice and they shoot them with a slow shutter. And I think that you can recreate this with this technique. That's as easy as it is. So if you wish you had done that horizontal pan or that vertical pan, you know, go through your old shots and try this technique on them. That way you get both. You get the straight shot as well as the in Photoshop shot. So let's look at a few more examples. This is one that I did with screen mode. It's sort of to me made it look like the leaves were falling with screen mode, and it didn't do that with normal. And this is one of my very favorite shots. This was first in the main photography show a few years ago. Here's a pathway edit Katya, and this is also, I believe, with that same blend mode. And here's one with normal. So it just changes the look a little bit, and I encourage you to try the different blending modes. This is obviously with light mode. You can see the real look of falling leaves. I think it's a beautiful effect for autumn, and all of this was done in Photoshop. This is a little road in Ireland that I wished I had panned eso through the magic of motor shop. I did another tree lined road here. I did bring back a little bit of the bark on some of the trees just toe pull back a little bit of detail. And this is one that I did in New York City. And, um, I'm not a city girl, so you might have guessed. Um, and, uh, the noise in the in the motion was fabulous, but we were walking down the street and I turned around and saw this guy with all these balloons walking across the street, and it didn't look like this, but in my mind it did, because that's all I saw. Then I didn't see the cars and hear the noise. I I saw him. And, um, I wanted to recreate that in Photoshop. So I went back in and took my shot of him and created motion blur horizontally to get the motion in the cars and thin out the other pedestrians so that they pretty much disappeared. There's just a ghosting of them. And then I made a mask and just brought him back. Just painted him back in to the scene. So did it look like this Onley in my mind? But that's okay, Andi, This technique let me recreate what I saw

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