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Final Cut Pro X Bootcamp

Lesson 17 of 39

Working with Photos and Graphics

 

Final Cut Pro X Bootcamp

Lesson 17 of 39

Working with Photos and Graphics

 

Lesson Info

Working with Photos and Graphics

scaling, cropping and positioning photos. What we're gonna look at, we're gonna look at scaling photos. We talked about that before. It's like what? You have a really big photo and you wanted to fit our What if you just need to scale something down because you want to picture in picture or multiple images? We're gonna look at trimming and cropping an image so you can actually change the the aspect ratio. Cut things out. Maybe I don't want to show the whole image animating with something called The Ken Burns Effect. Ken Burns became famous for a documentary. Did call the Civil War, where did lots of moves on photographs, historical photographs and documents. And for something where you basically had a bunch of stills. It was a very and this is not upon moving experience it is upon. But I really didn't intend only to dispute Fourth, but it's a great documentary. He's done many since he did baseball. Uh, but it's kind of know now, with the Ken Burns effect we did in the old days before Ke...

n Burns, he just did it so well. It got named. He got his name attached to it. There's also something called animating with key frames. So the Ken Burns is like a You set the beginning. You set the end and magic has done for you, which I really like because sometimes you just want to things fast and smooth. But if you really wanted to do intricate moves, we have key frames and we learned about key framing and audio. We did some simple key friends were got louder and softer and louder again. So key fame with video. It's going to start here, maybe go there, maybe go there, maybe grow so we'll look at that. And all of the things were learning with still images with photographs apply to video so you can also scale video. You can also fly video. You can also trim and crop video. You can also do Ken Burns moves on video. So even though we're going to be working with a still image, everything we're learning can be applied to a clip. So that's great. And then we're gonna wrap up with bringing in a photo shop, documents this so you can see how final cut handles Photoshopped documents, which is does very well. We're not gonna do a lot with Photoshopped documents because as we move forward, we're gonna learn how you can build some great graphics with a few clicks directly inside of Final Cut. So a lot of times you don't have to step out. Two Photoshopped Archer, a graphics program, and that's we're going to cover in the next 30 minutes. We'll see how long it takes and let's as we said, go to the laptop and start bringing in some pictures now. We didn't import a lot of pictures to start intentionally. Um, there were a couple places we learned we could do them. I could if I wanted to import any pictures that are in my photos a library so I could go through here and grab an image. And I literally confined an image that I like. Look at these, and these were kind of just shot with a high frame rate camera. I think. See if I got a good leap here. That's a good leap, and it's small, so it gives us something to work with someone. Just go ahead and I'm gonna drag that directly into a sequence because this is the first clip in the sequence one of the things that we we learned this actually, day one left and one, if you grab anything and drop it into a blank sequence, it asks if you want it to match the sequence. Or in this case, do you want to go with a default? I want to stay in a default 1920 by 10. 80. Probably want to do. Maybe 29 97 We touched on that earlier, just to refresh you. Most video in the U. S is at either 29 97 29 97 or we rounded to 30 frames a second or 24 frames a second. That's like theatrical film, so people like to shoot and edit in both flavors. If you are working in other parts of the world, many other parts of the world There's a format called PAL, which is 25 frames a second. So for those people around the world who are watching this yes, it works in PAL and actually has more power people than we are. NTSC 24 frames finally got working. Any of those one of the beautiful things about this we talked about it earlier. We're gonna talk about again. I'm gonna hit that one home. Final cut will adapt if you have footage, that is different frame rates. If you have some footage somebody shot on their IPhone at 30 and then you have somebody shot in their DSLR 24. It will match toe whatever the timeline is. So you don't have to worry about that. You don't have to think it does the thinking for you. Now, what will be different is when we bring this picture in this picture, depending on which camera I used, it's either a 12 megapixel or 24 megapixel image, and I'm gonna hit, okay, and then we'll talk a little bit about megapixels again. So I bring it in. I'm gonna hit Shift Z so we can fit it to the window. And if I go back into my browser and I look at this clip instead of looking this at this in the list is in the icon form are the thumbnail form. I'm gonna look at it as a list form, and when I look at this clip, that's one of one. Um, I could scroll over and see a lot of information about this such as possibly it's frame size. There's the camera I shot it on. It's so I have a feeling. What? The frame sizes. I don't see the frame size. This is my browser. If I want to see other parameters, I can simply right click on any of the top names, and by checking it, it will appear by uncheck ing it. It will disappear if I don't use it. So maybe I have never written any notes and I don't need to see that. But I do want to see frame size, and so probably through at the very end. I can rearrange this by just dragging them. And so this was 24 megapixels. 6000 by 4000 pixels. Okay, I had mentioned in earlier lessons. Television. Hi, def television is 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels high two megapixels. So if you had an old IPhone, you could shoot something. A smallest two megapixels. Most of what we're shooting now. Eight megapixels, 10 12 in our phones, some of the phones the galaxy are the other. The that of Google 1 40 megapixels. It's crazy. Cameras could do that these are huge. If you put these in and you don't shrink them down, you'll see, like this little part of the image. Okay, so that was the question earlier. Should we scale these down before we bring them in? Depending on the show And how Maney videos you have. You can scale it down because if you don't scale it down before you bring it in final cut, we'll do it. You're just making it to a lot more work than it needs to. So if I wasn't going to do any kind of zooming in, I might take it into ah, photo program and crop everything the way I want it. 16 by nine. Because this is three by two, probably, and export. It may be in 1920 by 10 80 I could just drop him in and it doesn't have to any extra math that calculates scaling it down. And things could be quicker. Have a fast computer. I might leave with full size. If I'm gonna do any kind of a move, maybe I'll do a multiplier instead of like, instead of you know, 1920 by 10. 80 a double each of those ah, 38 40 by Africa, 10 20 with us in 1920 by 10 80. Okay, 2160. See, my math teacher somewhere is very happy. As he's banging his head going. I finally got rid of that student, but eso I double everything now if I wanted to do a zoom in, I have the resolution toe work with without things getting soft. That's what you want to keep in mind if you're going to scale it down. And one thing we're going to with this image is we are going to zoom in, okay. I always try to do any kind of correction to my photography in a photo program. You can do color correction to. It's still image in final Cut. It's not the best use of the CPU, you know, because what you're doing is you're doing color correction 30 frames a second for multiple seconds. It's a lot of work where if you take it into photo shop or photos or light room, you can tweak it exactly how you want exported and you don't worry, and maybe you want to tweak it a little bit to match the video. So the colors don't change too much, but I do most of it. This is directly out of the camera. Who knows? It was probably bracketed. She was jumping. I probably was shooting it fast, but this is a huge image, and I just want you to be aware of that. If you bring in an image that's smaller than 1920 by 10 80 you could enlarge it. But it's going to get softer. Okay? And sometimes that's a necessary evil. People sell. Go ahead, grab the picture off my website. You can use it. It's for the Web. It's like 600 by 400. You're like so it's just things to keep in mind. And that's what we're going to learn is how to manipulate these images now. So I bring that in and it comes in at a fixed duration with a still image. When I bring it into my sequence, I could always grab it and make it longer or shorter as needed. I'm just grabbing the edge and extending it if I want to control what the still image sizes. If I go to the preferences and these air very simple. You don't have to get lost in complicated preference is one of the beauties of final cut. I can go ahead. Still, images duration is four seconds. If I know that every image I want to work with needs to be 10 seconds long for a video I'm doing, I change it to 10 because then I don't have to go back and change the 4 to 10 every time. But you never locked in is just a starting point.

Class Description

Don’t get confused or overwhelmed by the world of video - start piecing together your story with ease. Join Abba Shapiro as he walks through how to work effectively in Final Cut Pro X. In this series, you'll walk through the interface of this easy to navigate the program and quickly learn the ins and outs of this software. 


Abba will cover essential topics such as building a rough cut, working with audio and incorporating motion and titles in your videos. He will show basic color correction techniques as well as how to incorporate filters and transitions to enhance the look of your final video. 

Lesson Plan: 
  • Exploring the Interface 
  • Editing Techniques 
  • Setting up a Project from Scratch 
  • Working with Audio 
  • Incorporating Photos and Graphics 
  • Applying Filters and Transitions 
  • Creating Titles 
  • Color Correction and Speed Changes 
  • Multi-Camera Editing 
  • Exporting and Sharing Your Project 
By the end of this class, you will feel proficient in creating video with this program and be excited to continue to expand your skills. You’ll be able to bring your images to life by creating stories to share with your family, friends, and clients. If you’ve been thinking about expanding your business to include video, this class will help you get the technical confusion out of the way so you can focus on being creative.


SOFTWARE USED:
Final Cut Pro X (10.3)

Lessons

  1. Class Introduction
  2. Exploring Final Cut Pro X: Navigating the Interface
  3. Exploring Final Cut Pro X: Project Timeline
  4. Exploring Final Cut Pro X: Basic Editing
  5. Refining Your Edit Introduction
  6. Refining Your Edit: Trimming
  7. Refining Your Edit: J and L Cuts
  8. Refining Your Edit: Roll and Overwrite Edits
  9. Refining Your Edit: Slip and Slide Edits
  10. Refining Your Edit: Auditions
  11. Setting Up a Project From Scratch
  12. Setting Up a Project: Importing Media
  13. Setting Up a Project: Keywords and Smart Collections
  14. Working with Audio
  15. Working with Audio: Syncing
  16. Working with Audio: Mixing
  17. Working with Photos and Graphics
  18. Working with Photos and Graphics: Scaling and Positioning
  19. Working with Photos and Graphics: Ken Burns Effect
  20. Working with Photos and Graphics: Animating with Keyframes
  21. Filters and Transitions Introduction
  22. Filters and Transitions: Applying Transitions
  23. Filters and Transitions: Applying Filters
  24. Titles and Generators: Lower Thirds
  25. Titles and Generators: Titles
  26. Titles and Generators: Backgrounds
  27. Advanced Skills: Color Correction
  28. Advanced Skills: Speed Changes
  29. Advanced Skills: Stabilization
  30. Advanced Skills: Green Screen
  31. Multi Camera Editing
  32. Multi Camera Editing: Organizing Your Media
  33. Multi Camera Editing: Creating a Clip
  34. Multi Camera Editing: Audio
  35. Multi Camera Editing: Working with 4K Footage
  36. Finalizing, Exporting and Archiving: Final Checks and Tweaks
  37. Finalizing, Exporting and Archiving: Exporting Final Project
  38. Finalizing, Exporting and Archiving:Cleaning House and Archiving
  39. Bootcamp QnA

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

Wonderful. This is the first time I've seen any of Abba's classes, and he's a great teacher. I've been watching the live sessions for the past few days and have picked up a ton of great tips that will indeed speed up my workflow in FCPX. He's a great teacher, and does a wonderful job of setting people at ease, ie. where he says things like, 'there's no trick questions', and times where he will click on something wrong, then he'll go back and show his mistake (pointing out his minor mistakes are actually a beneficial lesson). In all, wonderful wonderful wonderful. Thank you!

Lara
 

Fantastic teacher. I enjoyed every video, super worth it. I've been reluctant to jump into FCP X since it got upgraded from FCP. Now I feel confident to work with it again. Seems pretty self explanatory, but I am glad I watched the course. Abba covers pretty much everything you need to know. I also loved his personality, made me want to learn more each day.

user-56b55e
 

Abba's Final Cut Pro Bootcamp is effective for enabling users to have success in this complex software. An effective teacher, he breaks the complex subject down, he repeats bits of info, he's worked out a set of clips that illustrate what he's teaching, he acknowledges that he screws up, that we will screw up, he cares that the viewing audience learns this, and, as an aside, he tells corny jokes which break things up. These qualities are present in each CL course I've bought. Thank you all.