Creating a Video From Start to Finish

Lesson 28 of 37

Refining the Story

 

Creating a Video From Start to Finish

Lesson 28 of 37

Refining the Story

 

Lesson Info

Refining the Story

Let's look at other statements. So I want to talk about doing the opening statement. Okay, the opening statement is gonna require statements from different parts of the clip, so we're gonna listen to the whole thing, okay, and we're gonna try to figure out here where some good nuggets are for us to actually be able to pull out a good opening statement. Before I do this, I want to just hone in. Remember my opening statement. I wanted something emotional. I said I want to go with something emotional, then I want to talk about maybe their history, and then I want to go into what you're gonna experience, then talk about the family or community and then end out on I think the why. So this is just another part of that edit. And if you start to think about your edit in that way, just little sections, how much easier is that? What did we just finish? We just finished walking to the gym. That's done. It's done. That part's done, it's in the can. Well, not really, you gotta add B Roll to it, but...

that's done. The easy part's the B Roll. The hard part's this part. Yeah? Hard part's this part. Let's do it again. Let's do it again. Absolutely, yeah. Well, my goodness. I've been extremely blessed to be in this space. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city looking at spaces. Looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places and I was very fortunate to look at this space here in the South Lake Union area, and I fell in love with it. We looked into it and it was a situation where it was growing, not knowing how big it was gonna get, it was crazy. The fact of the matter is that right now, there's a lot, a lot of energy in this area. They're knocking down blocks, neighborhoods to build up for the Amazon campus and for the biomedical field in this area. When we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. Yeah, it was all awesome. It was really tough. But then little by little. My name's Ivan Salaverry. I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. I'm used to dealing with a bunch of neanderthals (laughs) so having these guys that come through that are extremely smart and very cerebral change the dynamics of this gym and I love it. It's incredible. We have had a range of different types of personalities and people that come through here that give it depth and I enjoy it very, very much. It's not what I thought I was gonna do 10 years ago, but now... do 10 years ago, but now, man like I said, I'm blessed. Okay. So what are your first impressions of that footage? A lot. It's really dense, okay, super dense. And it's not easy. He doesn't really say anything that strikes out at me as being like ooh, I gotta cut that. So that first technique of ooh, I gotta cut, cut, cut, cut might not be, so now I gotta listen to it again and be very discerning. Listen for themes. Listen for thematic elements. Listen to that narrative. Get back to your storyboard. Lean on that. What's this section about? It's something about emotions. It's emotional. It's something we need to lean on really, really hard right now because I've got what, three minutes of footage here that I gotta get down. I gotta cut it down, all right? So here we go. Absolutely, yeah. Well, my goodness. I've been extremely blessed to be in this space. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. Looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places and I was very fortunate to look at this space here in the South Lake Union area and I fell in love with it. We looked into it and it was a situation where it was growing, not knowing how big it was gonna get. It was crazy. The fact of the matter is that right now, there's a lot, a lot of energy in this area. They're knocking down blocks, neighborhoods to build up for the Amazon campus and for the biomedical field in this area. When we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. Yeah, it was awesome. It was really tough. But then little by little. My name is Ivan Salaverry. I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. I'm used to dealing with a bunch of neanderthals (laughs) so having these guys that come through that are extremely smart and very cerebral changed the dynamics of this gym and I love it. It's incredible. We have had a range of different types of personalities and people that come through here that give it depth and I enjoy it very, very much. It's not what I thought I was gonna do 10 years ago, but now. 10 years ago, but now, man, like I said, I'm blessed. I'm blessed. So, same technique guys. You go through. You listen. You cut. And then you go through, you listen and you keep cutting and this is what I mean. This is, this is the meat and potatoes to editing. This is the mind-numbing, boring, really, really agonizing part of editing that you will begin to love. That you're gonna end up loving and hating. You're gonna hate and love it. It's gonna be something that's so necessary, yet so evil in your life. So, at this point, if I've spent two hours doing this stuff already, I'm walking away. I'm walking away. I'm taking a 20, 30 minute break. 'cause I know that this, I'm not gonna be able to get right if I'm sitting there hacking away at it. So I'm gonna get there. I'm gonna make my little whack-a-mole cuts and I'm gonna go away for a bit. Go play a video game. Go run around with my dog, dogs, whatever. Hang out for a minute. Let my brain absorb what I've just seen. And then I'm gonna come back and start looking at it again. And what you're gonna hear is you're gonna hear other elements that are gonna creep up in this narrative and hopefully as we start to hack away at it even more, the stuff starts to rise to the surface a little bit for us. You know, editing is so organic because what you're doing is you're responding to the footage that you have shot over and over and over again and no matter what, the process is entirely dependent upon how you shot the footage, how you interpret the footage and how you are going to present the footage. That is what is so powerful about this. This is truly where you get to be creative. This is truly where you get to say something. And this is your opportunity now, as a content creator, to take what someone else has said to you and be their mouthpiece, which for me, is so cool. That's the cool part of this thing. Cool, so let's actually go through it again and then I'll show you what we ended up doing or what I ended up thinking I was gonna do. I ended up changing it for the final, but let's look at it again. Absolutely, yeah. Well, my goodness. I've been extremely blessed to be in this space. So he says blessed in the beginning and I know he said blessed at the end and I chopped the blessed at the end because it sounded better. So I'm gonna get rid of that first statement, just because I know I've got something else that says blessed and I'm gonna just hack at it. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. Looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places and I was very fortunate to look at this space here in the South Lake Union area. Okay, so I'm gonna pull these two statements across, so I'm gonna separate them. I'm gonna play them together for us, just so we can get a feeling for what they sound like together and what they sound like separately. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city. Okay, walked around the city. Is that a good statement? I think so. What about this one? When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. Looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places. Okay, I would go... And I was very fortunate to look- I would probably cut it right after spaces. So let's do that. Let's actually zoom on in here. Let's find that phrase. Spaces. Okay, cut it right there. And then move that side out. So here's his statement. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. That's a good statement. That's a great statement. Now I'm gonna keep going. Listen to the rest of this. So that means this guy, I can get rid of. I don't need it. This guy right here. Looking at little warehouses. He saw warehouses. At all different places. It's talking about still looking around. Don't need it. Get rid of it. Okay, now we're back over here to the other clips. And I fell in love with it. We looked into it. Wait, and I fell in love with it. Spaces. Not quite what I need. And I fell in love with it. We looked into it and it was a situation where it was growing, not knowing how big it was gonna get. It was crazy. The fact of the matter is that right now, there's a lot, a lot of energy in this area. They're building out. You know, that's just a lot of background I don't need, so I'm gonna cut that whole statement and get rid of it all. To build up for the Amazon campus. Don't need it. Anything referring to any other business or any type of people, don't need it. Do you know why? I don't want to pigeonhole him into being oh, the Amazon gym. Forget it, get rid of it. And when we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. Wait a second. When the first pad of clientele, it was 'cause people- I need that statement because it's honoring, remember in the first segment? Honoring his older customer? He has that customer still. We need to honor his original customer base, so I'm gonna find a way to salvage that statement out. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. Yeah-- Okay, I don't need that reh. So, I'm gonna use this statement. And when we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. That's a great freaking statement. In just a simple phrase, boom, I've touched upon their history. So, let's go ahead and, give me a second. Let's bring these three statements together. Why isn't it rippling? Okay, well here, just do this. Okay. All right, let's listen to this real quick. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. And when we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. Holy shnikes. (audience laughs) When I first moved here 10 years ago, I was looking at spaces and our first clientele came here because... Got rid of all that stuff and brought it down to a factual, small, digestible nugget that just illustrates exactly what we need. This is editing. It's down in the weeds, listening to what your subjects tell you, listening to the things that matter. Playing whack-a-mole. Getting rid of that. Crafting those statements. Crafting those statements, okay? So now, let me just flip over to the opening that we got out of those statements, okay? Passion for fighting and wrestling. If you experienced it, you understand it. It's incredible. It's like you think about it, you obsess about it. Those are passion statements that I pulled from other parts of the footage. You go running, you think about it. At nighttime, you think about moves, you think about old wrestling matches from the Olympics and NCAA, so you're completely obsessed by it, if you like it. I loved it, so it was incredible. My name is Ivan Salaverry. I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. And when we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters, yeah, it was all awesome. It was really tough. But then, little by little, we have had a range of different types of personalities and people that come through here that give it depth and I enjoy it very, very much. It's not what I thought I was gonna do 10 years ago, but now I'm blessed. So that's a statement that I crafted. That was my initial rough statement. As I was playing whack-a-mole, that was the initial rough statement that I used to lead into my edit and I did it over and over and over again until I got to my rough cut. You don't edit a rough cut, guys. You build a rough cut with smaller edits. You don't just go all of a sudden, sit down and out pops a rough cut. You sit down and you hack away at footage and you slowly build statements that then become a narrative, that then becomes your rough cut. When I call it a rough cut, I'm only talking about the complete total narrative, regardless of B Roll. I haven't touched B Roll yet. We do it in stages. Don't rush to the B Roll 'cause if you lay the B Roll, you're gonna get distracted by the B Roll and not listen to the statements. Don't touch your B Roll yet. There's no reason to. So, I'm gonna show you guys the full, without B Roll, rough cut right now. We're gonna listen to it. So this one's nearly four minutes long and I know, that at four minutes long, it's not anywhere close to being done, but I want you to get a feeling for how much footage we had and how much we cut it down into four minutes. We're just gonna listen to it. You're gonna see a picture up here. It's just him talking. What I want you to do is close your eyes and just listen to the story. And what's gonna happen is you're gonna hear it and then you're gonna acknowledge that more stuff needs to be cut. You're gonna stop listening at points. So I'm just gonna play it and then we're gonna go ahead and just listen. Passion for fighting and wrestling. If you experienced it, you understand it. It's incredible. It's like you think about it, you obsess over it. You love it. Everyday you think, you wake up to it, you go running, you think about it. At nighttime, you think about moves. You think about old wrestling matches from the Olympics and NCAA, so you're completely obsessed by it, if you like it. I loved it, so it was incredible. My name is Ivan Salaverry. I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. When I first started 10 years ago, I just walked around the city, looking at spaces. Looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places and I was very fortunate to look at this space in here in the South Lake Union area. And when we first started, the clientele came because we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters, yeah, it was all awesome. It was really tough, but then little by little, we have had a range of different types of personalities and people that come through here that give it depth and I enjoy it very, very much. It's not what I thought I was gonna do 10 years ago, but now I'm blessed. When you first walk into the gym, you might be nervous. You might be nervous, like what am I getting into? What is this? But we take you through the process. You come in here and like anything else, it becomes a step by step process. You come in here, you put your wrestling shoes on and the next thing you know, you do a little bit of stretching. The coach guides you into a warm-up, then teaches you a certain technique and then little by little, you start gaining these techniques and you start wrestling with these techniques and that process, the day in, day out of doing that, you learn how to wrestle. Then comes, obviously, what you get from wrestling. The endorphins, the biochemistry of just the adrenaline. To me, I honestly believe that every man and every woman needs that. And that's what I think that I create- and it might not be wrestling. It could be boxing, it could be kickboxing. Then, all of a sudden, you get this fever for it and that, I believe, is the passion, is that all of a sudden you have become very enthusiastic for the feelings and what you get from it. For every person that's coming in here, I have an array of reasons why they're here. I've had guys in here that are in my MMA program, fighting elite level and they graduated with a doctorates. Then I have construction workers in here that just want to do a little bit of boxing. So, you have to come in here and create your own path. What you get here is organic. It really, really is. You can't put this on a business plan. This environment is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym. I'm blessed to have what I have here and you can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not, per se, lifting iron or going on a treadmill or on a bike. We're dealing with human beings and what they experience is addictive. There's nothing more primal than to be able to be competing head to head against a person because it involves competing with yourself. It involves a team. But going head to head against somebody creates a very unique experience and it teaches you a lot about you. So it's at this point in my edit, guys, it's at this point that I now realize I'm only about halfway there. Because you can see how rough it was, right? There's a lot of statements in there. There's a narrative happening, right? We started, we kind of arced up a little bit and came back down and we ended on a why. God, that why was really good. Teaches you about you. You should come to us because you're gonna learn about you. That's such a great why. We want to teach you about yourself is essentially what he's saying. What a phenomenal why. Such a powerful statement there. I'm at almost four minutes here. So as I go through this edit, as I'm listening, I'm starting to try to hone in. If now I know what that why is at the end, and did I know that going in? No. How did I find that? Just whack-a-mole. Continual whack-a-mole taught me the why for this piece and I guarantee you if you put in the time and if you do it this way, it will not fail you. It will not fail you because in doing this, what's gonna happen is you're just gonna learn how people talk and you're gonna learn how he talks and you're gonna learn how he's gonna say a statement and how he says a statement and how you can restructure that statement into saying something exactly the way he wants to say it to his customer. As we run into shortening our rough cut. So I shortened it again and I went from almost four minutes down to like two or three and 1/2 minutes and then I think since it's so fresh, what I want you guys to listen to is we're gonna listen to the end. We're gonna listen to the end of this piece and you can see how much I cut out of just the end to shorten it up and to tighten up those statements a little bit. So we're gonna listen to the end of the first version. So here's the end. It really, really is. You can't put this on a business plan. This environment is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym. I'm blessed to have what I have here. You can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not, per se, lifting iron or going on a treadmill or on a bike. We're dealing with human beings. What they experience is addictive. There's nothing more primal than to be able to be competing head to head against a person because it involves competing with yourself. It involves a team. But going head to head against somebody creates a very unique experience and it teaches you a lot about you. Okay, we're gonna go to the end right away. Per se. This environment is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym. And I'm blessed to have what I have here. And you can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not, per se, lifting iron or going on a treadmill or on a bike. We're dealing with human beings. What they experience is addictive. Oops, sorry, okay. There's nothing more primal than to be able to be competing head to head against a person because it involves competing with yourself. It involves a team. But going head to head against somebody creates a very unique experience. And it teaches you a lot about you. We're gonna go to the last one now. Here's the last version of that end. Culture. We're not, per se-- Sorry. Is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym and I'm blessed to have what I have here and you can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not, per se lifting iron or going on a treadmill or on a bike. We're dealing with human beings. What they experience is addictive because it involves competing with yourself, it involves a team, and it teaches you a lot about you. Did you guys get that? When you listen to it in succession like that, right? When you listen to it like wow that's a great statement. Ooh, that got better. Oh my god, that's it. It just involved just cutting and cutting and cutting and cutting and cutting and cutting. That's why getting here is so important because here, he's saying too much. Here, it's entirely too much. Right here, it's forcing you to get those statements down in a way that will allow you to communicate the most amount of information in the least amount of words possible. There's a magic feeling around the two minute, 230 minute mark. That's where all the sweet stuff starts to happen. So, you guys got it? Yeah? Okay, that's how I edit and it's not levers and pulleys. It's just whack, whack, whack, whack, whack, whack, whack. Okay? Yeah. Does the client ever go, "wow, "I had no idea I was so eloquent?" (audience laughs) You know a lot of the time, they do say, "wow, that's awesome. "it sounds really good." I think they surprise themselves because these are just their words. You're just putting it together. These are their words. So wonderful, it's great. He had a great, perfect deep voice. Do you ever have clients where you get back in the editing room and they're changing tempo a lot or they have a lot of listing in their voice and it's more difficult to move things around and cut? Is there anything you can do in editing to fix that or is it just kinda cut it, let it go and move on? So, there's two options there. Your first option is if you can catch it in production, you gotta remind them. He spoke very deliberately. Very easy to cut him. I've had people go like mmm, well, you know, I, uh, you know, I uh... So getting someone to stop that because you have to stop that in production. It's as simple as saying, "hey, you know what? "as you answer, just remember that we need you "to just talk a little bit slower "and if I do this, that's all I mean. "Just, hey, I want to get every word you're saying. "so just talk a little bit slower." If for some reason, you can't get them to do that in production or it's unnatural for them, there were some moments in here where Ivan was mumbling and getting his words caught together. If you zoom in. If you zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom in to the timeline, you can usually cut right as that form comes down and get a nice clean cut out of it. And sometimes you try to mash it in and sometimes it doesn't work. That's when you actually just gotta get rid of it. You just gotta know when to hit the eject button. You can try, try, try and if it doesn't fit, get it out.

Class Description

AFTER THIS CLASS YOU’LL BE ABLE TO:

  • Confidently make a movie from start to finish
  • Expand your photography skills to motion pictures
  • Tackle pre-production and post-production essentials
  • Capture video and audio expertly
  • Edit in Adobe Premiere Pro and Audition

ABOUT VICTOR’S CLASS:

Photography and videography have several things in common -- but what about factors like audio and telling a story using video editing? In this filmmaking class designed for photographers, learn how to use the DSLR or mirrorless camera that you already have to capture high-end videos. In this start-to-finish course, you'll master everything from planning to post-production. The goal of the class is to teach anyone how to create a video from start to finish.

Dive into video production from the planning and pre-production phase, where you'll learn how to choose an idea, scope out locations, research the client, and more. Jump into video gear -- and what's really necessary on a low-budget -- and learn the essential filmmaking tips for recording. Discover how to capture excellent audio and tackle those B-Roll shots.

But this filmmaking course doesn't just teach you how to use editing software -- you'll learn the editing process, start to finish, from storyboarding to exporting. Work in Adobe Premiere Pro to perfect your footage and Adobe Audition to fine-tune that audio. Tweak color in DaVinci Resolve. Add soundtracks, titles, and keyframes. Then, finalize and export your project.

WHO THIS CLASS IS FOR:

  • Photographers eager to add motion pictures to their repertoire
  • Beginner filmmakers
  • Self-taught filmmakers ready for additional insight

SOFTWARE USED: Adobe Audition, Adobe Premiere Pro, DaVinci Resolve

ABOUT YOUR INSTRUCTOR:

Previously a photographer, Victor Ha is now a filmmaker. His experience working with both stills and motion pictures helps him guide other photographers through the same process, from photo to video. He's known for his straightforward, practical teaching style that's easy to follow along with.

Lessons

  1. Class Introduction

    In the first lesson, meet your instructor and learn what to expect during the class. Know what's up ahead by pinpointing the goals for this class at each production stage.

  2. Putting Ideas Into Motion

    Start the filmmaking process with an idea. Learn how to flesh out ideas and turn them into successful projects.

  3. Client Profiles

    Video projects come in many different forms, from cinemagraphs and short films to commercials and features. A client profile is a type of video telling a story about a person or business. Learn what's involved in this simple video type as an easy format to get started with.

  4. Choosing Your Subject

    Video projects start with a subject -- but just how do you choose? In this lesson, Victor discusses how to narrow down your ideas to choose the best one.

  5. Scouting Locations

    Part of the planning process is scouting out different locations, an essential part of pre-production. Learn what to look for when scouting out different locations and how to spot good camera angles. Then, work with that information as you prep for shooting.

  6. Researching the Client

    Understanding the client -- and what they are looking for in a video -- sets the stage for a successful video project. Learn how to research your client and the essential pre-production questions to ask.

  7. Choosing Equipment

    You don't need an elaborate amount of gear to shoot video -- Victor goes through the essentials for video, and how that list may change for different products.

  8. Waveforms and Scopes

    Waveform monitors show a visual of the video's exposure. Using waveforms along with vectorscopes can help you get the best results in camera as you shoot. While confusing at first, these tools offer big advantages on set.

  9. Shooting Strategy

    Build a strategy to organize those thoughts from pre-production and create a shooting schedule for the project. Incorporate these factors into a shooting strategy for success.

  10. Interview: Setting Up for Success

    The interview is an essential style for filmmaking. In this lesson, learn how to set up an interview for the best results, including audio suggestions and pitfalls to avoid.

  11. Prepping for the Interview

    Before you head into the interview, have a list of questions -- and practice asking them. Master the essentials for interview prep, including research.

  12. Capturing Audio

    Video and audio go hand-in-hand. Gain tips for capturing the best audio for your video, from dual system sound and setting levels to working with audio gear.

  13. Capturing Room Tone

    By recording the ambient noise in the room, unwanted background noise is easier to edit out. Learn how to capture the room tone and tricks to create better audio by adjusting the room.

  14. Audio Q&A

    Audio is scary stuff -- learn from the most frequently asked questions from students like you.

  15. B-Roll: 3 to 1 ratio

    B-Roll is supporting footage for your video, helping to add interest and fill gaps. In this lesson, learn why B-Roll is important -- and how much you need to shoot.

  16. Planning for B-Roll

    B-Roll should help tell your story -- so what should you capture, especially when the scene doesn't seem so interesting? Find out how to plan for B-Roll and ideas for the most interesting shots.

  17. 5 Rules to Capturing B-roll

    Use these guidelines to capture better B-Roll for your project, from gear tips to determining what's important.

  18. Using B-Roll to Shape an Edit

    B-Roll is secondary footage -- learn how to tackle video editing with B-Roll in mind. Then, jump into editing with Adobe Premiere Pro editing software.

  19. Introduction to Footage Review

    After recording, you may have hours of footage -- how do you decide what goes in and what stays out? Make footage review less daunting by tackling your fears first.

  20. Asset Management

    Organizing footage saves time and helps you get a jump start on that edit -- but the organization doesn't have to be elaborate. Learn how to manage the assets for your film project.

  21. Edit Setup

    Before you edit, preparing helps get the film project off on the right foot. Learn how to prep for editing, from working on audio first to identifying mistakes.

  22. Edit Audio in Adobe Audition

    Victor suggests photographers edit audio first to get the aspect that we're least familiar with out of the way. Build an understanding of audio editing and skills for using Adobe Audition, including eliminating that room noise.

  23. Syncing Your Footage

    Set up for a successful edit by creating "goal posts" and allowing enough time to reach each one. Start working on the edit by laying out the timeline and syncing footage.

  24. Conceptual Storyboarding

    Building a storyboard guides the edit and helps you tell a story, without meandering away from what's important. Create a successful story -- and learn why Victor creates his later in the process -- by working with a storyboard.

  25. Editing Choices

    Video editing is full of choices -- but you can always change your mind. Learn how to get over hurdles and make the best choices for your filmmaking project.

  26. Selecting a Soundtrack

    Soundtracks give your edits a tempo -- but what song should you choose? Victor talks about choosing neutral soundtracks, avoiding songs you already know, understanding copyright, and everything you need to know about soundtracks.

  27. Building the Rough Cut

    Start turning that storyboard into an actual edit by building the rough cut. Learn how to shrink down long footage, decide what to cut and what to trim, and start organizing footage.

  28. Refining the Story

    Take that rough cut and turn it into something less rough. Start moving footage around to match that storyboard. Victor explains the "meat and potatoes of editing" -- going through footage, listening, cutting, and repeating that same process again.

  29. Adding B-Roll

    With the shape of the video in place, work in footage from the second camera and B-Roll footage to fix continuity issues or simply add more interest. Develop not just an understanding of the editing software, but a workflow for editing your film project.

  30. Rough Cut to Final Cut

    Move from that rough cut to the final cut with an overview of the last stretch of the editing process, including mastering transitions, color edits, and polishing that timeline.

  31. Color Grading in DaVinci Resolve

    Create color-graded videos inside DaVinci Resolve. Learn how to use the software, import and export, and color grade your project.

  32. Three-Way Color Corrector in DaVinci Resolve

    A three-way color corrector allows you to fine-tune RGB values. Walk through the basic color correcting process to correct issues like color cast.

  33. Export from DaVinci Resolve to Adobe Premiere Pro

    With the color correction finished, be sure to export your file properly for a seamless transition back into Premiere Pro.

  34. Add a Title in Adobe Premiere Pro

    Adding text and titles in Premiere Pro is simple. Learn how to add text frames to your video project without leaving Premiere Pro.

  35. Export Project from Adobe Premiere Pro

    Once your edit is finished, it's time to deliver. Learn how to export your project from Premiere Pro.

  36. Adding a Keyframe

    Keyframes are simply markers in the video that signify the start and the end of a change. In this lesson, Victor uses keyframes to adjust the audio of only a small portion of the video.

  37. Creating Multiple Projects from Your Edit

    With the main project done, what else can you build from your material? In this lesson, Victor discusses additional options to add to smaller supplemental projects to your main work.

Reviews

Beatriz Stollnitz
 

Victor is an incredible instructor, clearly passionate about teaching videography to photographers. His teaching style is engaging and energetic, and the content is interesting and useful. I was very fortunate to be part of the audience for this course.

Lynne Harty
 

Victor is a wonderful, knowledgeable and enthusiastic teacher - I learned so much. Thank you.