Creating a Video From Start to Finish

 

Creating a Video From Start to Finish

 

Lesson Info

Rough Cut to Final Cut

But before we start, you know, I wanna go back to Premier here. And in our last segment, what we did was, we assembled a rough cut, you know, we looked at the different rough cuts that I had, okay? So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna start this segment by going back one rough cut, and then going to the final cut with the B roll laid in, okay? So there's gonna be a version in the middle that we're not gonna see. So we're gonna see the one that's like three and a half minutes, and then we're gonna jump to the one that's about two and a half minutes and we're gonna see the difference, okay? And I think what you're gonna find when you take a look at that is the first one gets the message across, but the second one, what it does for us is it helps us really emphasize the why. It helps us really emphasize the message that we're trying to get across. And remember, that five sentence story board that I put together for this edit, it starts to ring true here a little bit when we take a look at th...

at two minute and thirty second edit. Okay, so here's that longer edit, it's gonna be running about, ah, I'd say it's about three minutes or you know, three minutes and change so... (rewinding video) Okay, here we go. And I'll go full screen for this. Passion for fighting and wrestling, if you experienced it, you understand it. It's incredible, it's like you think about it, you obsess over it, you love it. Every day you think, you wake up to it you go running, you think about it. At night time you think about moves, you think about old wrestling matches from the Olympics, and, you know, NCAA so you're completely obsessed by it, if you like it. I loved it, so it was incredible. My name is Ivan Salaverry, I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. When I first started ten years ago, I just walked around the city looking at spaces, we're looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places, and when we first started the clientele came because, you know, we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters. Yeah, it was all awesome, it was really tough but then little by little, we have had a range of different type of personalities and people that come through here, that give it depth, and I enjoy it very, very much. It's not what I thought I was gonna do ten years ago, but now I'm blessed. When you first walk into the gym you might be nervous you might be nervous, like, what am I getting into? What is this? But we take you through the process. You come in here and like anything else it becomes a step by step process, you come in here, you put your wrestling shoes on, and next thing you know, you do a little bit of stretching the coach guides you into a warm up then teaches you a certain technique. And then little by little you start gaining these techniques and you start wrestling with these techniques. And that process, the day in, day out of doing that, you learn how to wrestle. Then, comes obviously what you get from wrestling, the endorphins, the biochemistry, of just the adrenaline. To me, I honestly believe that every man and every woman needs that. And that's what I think that I create. And it, might not be wrestling, it could be boxing. It could be kick-boxing. And then all of a sudden you get this fever for it. And that I believe is the passion. Is that obviously you have become very enthusiastic for what, the feelings and what you get from it. This environment is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities, and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym. And I'm blessed to have what I have here. You can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not, per se, lifting iron or going on a treadmill or on a bike. We're dealing with human beings. What they experience is addictive. There's nothing more primal than to be able to be competing head-to-head against a person. Because it involves competing with yourself, it involves a team, but going head-to-head against somebody creates a very unique experience. And it teaches you a lot about you. Okay, so we're gonna go straight to the next cut, okay. The truth behind passion is that you can't teach passion. If you experienced it, you understand it. It's incredible, it's like you think about it, you obsess over it, if you like it. I loved it so it was incredible. My name is Ivan Salaverry, I have a MMA gym here in the South Lake Union area of Seattle, Washington. When I first started ten years ago, I just walked around the city, looking up spaces. We're looking at little warehouses, looking at all different places and when we first started the clientele came because, you know, we had a very good MMA program. It was very competitive, lots of fighters, but then little by little we have had a range of different types of personalities and people that come through here that give it depth. And I enjoy it very very much. When you first walk into the gym, you might be nervous, you might be nervous like, What am I getting into? What is this? But, we take you through the process. You come in here and like anything else it becomes a step-by-step process. You come in here, you put your wrestling shoes on, and next thing you know, you do a little bit of stretching, the coach guides you into a warm up, then teaches you a certain technique and then little by little you start gaining these techniques and you start wrestling with these techniques. And that process, that day in, day out of doing that you learn how to wrestle. Then comes, obviously the, what you get from wrestling, the endorphins, the biochemistry of just the adrenaline, then all of a sudden you get this fever for it and that I believe is the passion. Is that obviously you have become very enthusiastic for what, the feelings and what you get from it. This environment is very natural and it creates itself because there's so many personalities and the grouping of these personalities creates the gym and I'm blessed to have what I have here. And you can't duplicate this as far as the culture. We're not per se lifting iron or going on treadmill or on a bike, we're dealing with human beings. What they experience is addictive because it involves competing with yourself, it involves a team and it teaches you a lot about you. Cool, so what we noticed there, guys as we kind of move from that rough cut to the cut where we actually laid in the B roll and laid in the soundtrack all of a sudden we have a lot of moving parts now that become much more inspirational, ya know? We spent the last seven lessons learning how to get to that point, okay? We're still not done yet though. 'Cause if you notice, the color was off. If you noticed, you know, how can I clean up this timeline? You notice the video was like, choppy and that kind of stuff. It was dropping frames because my computer is just completely chugging through a lot of information, okay? So, there's little fine tune things that we have to do to this in order to get us to the point of delivery, okay? The last 10, 15 percent here is probably gonna be the most intensive, the most time consuming, the most really, really concentration necessary work you're gonna have to do, okay? So, what am I talking about? So let me get out of this project and get into the next project here so that we can actually look at something real. Okay, so just give me a quick second. (keys clicking) Okay, so what we have here, give me a minute. What we have here is our completed timeline, okay? And when I say that it's not clean, can you see how each track here, sometimes is doubled up? In terms of video. I've got camera one here is showing track two, but I've got video laid in underneath there. If I don't clean up my timeline here, If I don't clean up my timeline here, what's gonna end up happening is when I get into DaVinci, I'm gonna see a lot of clips that I think I'm gonna have to grade, okay? But I won't need to grade them in reality. It's gonna really confuse what you're looking at. There are some people who can manage that, I'm trying to get it down to as little bit as possible for us to look at so that we're not overwhelmed, so that we can just get in and get out without losing our shirt, okay? So, when I say clean up a timeline, all I mean is this. See how it looks different, much different now, okay? Here's the first timeline that I had. Here's the second timeline, okay? So I'm picking and choosing and as that play head comes from here to here it's playing video track one, then video track two, then one, then two, then one, then two, then one, and then it's going to B roll 'cause my third track is my B roll track, yeah? One, two, B roll, two, B roll, two, B roll, two, one B roll When you do this, what is does is it allows you to do what's called exporting an XML out into DaVinci Resolve much more cleanly, okay? So when you do this, there's a couple things you wanna pay attention to, no titling, absolutely no titling, no transitions, no transitions, you want it as simple as possible. 'Cause what round-tripping is, raw to jpeg. That's what we're doing. Not in a sense that, we're not jpeg-ing out our file, we're baking the changes into the file, or a copy of the file when we hit DaVinci. So I'm taking this clip, I'm putting it in DaVinci, and then I'm gonna do some stuff in DaVinci and then I'm gonna kick it out of DaVinci as a second file but, as that file, that's it, it's toasted here. Raw bread, toasted. Once it's toasted, I can't un-toast it, right? (audience chuckling) That's the concept here, so once it's toasted, I'm gonna take it back into Premier, and take that toast and make a sandwich out of it. (audience chuckling) But if at any moment, I think the bread's too toasted, I have to start back over here with the raw bread, and choose the level of brownness that I want. So that when I get that into Premier, the sandwich that I'm having is properly toasted. So any change you need to make here to the toasting of the bread, has to be done in DaVinci, you follow? That is round-tripping. That is round-tripping. Because once you get here and you've got that toasted bread with that sandwich, you've gotta, gotta, gotta be sure that you want that because you can't just change it anymore whereas before, you got to DaVinci you could make all the changes you want. Okay, you follow? Great, you had a question? Two things, so would you remove your scratch track out of here? Yeah, so I would remove my scratch track. I've got a couple of other tracks in here. I'm gonna keep my soundtrack in, this track up here, right here, is what I wanna keep, that's my audio track that I've gotta keep in. And the other thing is, so, I've been playing around with Premier and then using Adobe SpeedGrade for color grading, and then the latest version of Premier, they removed the automatic button that took everything into SpeedGrade, so I guess I'm just wondering why you're using DaVinci. Does Premier not have good color grading features, what's going on with speedgrade, why wouldn't you just stay in the Adobe environment? That's a great question. If I had my choice I would stay in the Adobe environment, unfortunately time kind of took over there, so I learned DaVinci, I learned DaVinci before I could learn SpeedGrade and then the functionality in DaVinci became something that I learned much more quickly because of the color target in DaVinci. So that color target, I'm gonna show you very, very shortly here, that color target saves me hours of color grading. Hours of color grading because what it'll do is it'll allow me to match footage from different cameras by just shooting the target. That's what's so impressive about DaVinci, is that I can use that target, match my footage, go through and then just kinda take a look and do some color adjustments and take a look at wave forms and make some adjustments some stylistic adjustments, maybe I wanna add more contrast or whatever it is, but then I don't have to worry about color so much. So, once I get to this point, it's really easy. Very, very, very, very, very, very, very easy. So I'm gonna keep my timeline open, I'm gonna come down here, I'm going to say export Final Cut Pro XML. What this does, is this is a function inside of Premier that essentially writes a bunch of little instructions into a file, okay? Bunch of little instructions into a file that then DaVinci can look at and go oh! He needs to do this, but before I do anything, I have to still do some more prep work on my timeline, okay? In order for me to edit, at that first point, in order for me to edit what I had to do here was initially what I did was come in here and doot, doot do, I clicked a clip here, gimme a second. Initially, when you guys come in, and put footage into a timeline, right? It gets that big doesn't it? So that's 4k footage sitting at a 1080 timeline. And as you saw, like, as we saw yesterday, we go, oh, okay well that's confusing. There's two ways for us to scale this footage down for us to make it usable. One way is great for DaVinci, the other way is not. So one way people scale footage is by doing this. They click the footage, they come here to scale, and they bring it down by like 50% and boom, hey it's framed. And then they do that to every clip. Well the problem here is when XML writes out the changes, it writes out that the clip must be reduced by 50%. So then when you actually bring it into DaVinci, it's 50% small. So what I can do here, we want to be able to see the full frame in DaVinci, so instead of coming here and doing this at 50%, we're gonna right click and then click scale to frame size. The scaling function on the timeline allows you, inside of DaVinci, to see the full image, okay? Edge to edge. It doesn't touch anything, it just allows you to see it. Got a question? So when you did the scale a moment ago in effects, clip by clip, It was full. Yeah, right, so are you doing, specifically doing scale to frame size as opposed to set to frame size? Is that the the differentiation that you're making there? Yes I'm doing scale to frame size here. So I'm gonna scale to frame size, and once I do that, you notice it's a little different? I've got a black bar here and a black bar here now. That's okay, just ignore it, don't get distracted here. It's okay here, we're gonna do scale to frame size and then move on. So what I'm gonna do here, alright, is I've already preselected, I've already done it all, but if you look at all of my time one clips. Boom, I've scaled everything to frame size. So, no transitions, no titling, no scale up here, okay, in effects controls. Do not scale in effects controls. In motion effects up here, if I click on effects controls and I come over here to motion and I hit that twirler, do not scale here. You're gonna select all the clips that need to be scaled and you're gonna right click on the timeline and click scale to frame size. That's step, whatever, step two or three. So from here, I think we're ready. You're gonna go file, export, Final Cut Pro. It's gonna boom, boom, boom, hey it's gonna ask you, where should I save this? I'm gonna save it into a folder that I've called XML exports, inside of my project files. And I'm just gonna go ahead and hit save. It does it. Kicks it out, done. Gives me a little translation report, say, hey if you wanna read that report, go ahead, all right. So now, I'm done in Premier. Okay, that's it. Not done, done, done, I'm just done for the time being.

Class Description

"A tumultuous amount of technique and process info given by Victor in this class. Just wonderful. Well done." - Michael UK

Creating a film or video is a decision-making process from beginning to end. From what type of story you want to create, where to film, how to capture audio, editing your story together - the entire process can be overwhelming and confusing. Victor Ha will make this process attainable by laying out the foundation to set yourself up for success in the planning and pre-production phases. Victor will show you how effective planning can make your shoot and edit faster and easier. Understanding this workflow and adding video to your portfolio can increase your business and expand your creative offerings. In this class, Victor will cover:

  • Pre-production techniques like creating shot lists and shoot schedules 
  • How to use your DSLR to capture video 
  • Capturing the right footage for the edit 
  • How to piece together a rough cut in Adobe Premiere Pro CC 
  • Producing multiple pieces from one shoot 
This class will take you step by step from concept to completion so that you can begin creating films with your clients and friends within 48 hours.


"Love this class! Victor really knows how to break things to simple language so you understand and retain. He also teaches you all the fundamentals before you ever fire up your camera. Victor is Ha-mazing!" - Jerry Suhrstedt