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Hot Tips from the Photoshop Playbook

Lesson 8 of 11

Depth of Field Modifications in Photoshop

 

Hot Tips from the Photoshop Playbook

Lesson 8 of 11

Depth of Field Modifications in Photoshop

 

Lesson Info

Depth of Field Modifications in Photoshop

two different sides of depth of field one introducing a shallow depth of field, which I think is really interesting. Getting one shooting with the IPhone or with a lens that doesn't, you know, shoot it a really shallow depth field, um, and the other using multiple images to get extended depth of field. So first will go with this picture of my little boy and what we're gonna dio. There's a bit of a vignette on here, but what I want to do is I want to soften it, and I want a lens blur a lot of different ways to do that in photo shop. One of the ways that's the easiest to Dio is using one of our new blur filters, just a not really new anymore. I've been in here a few versions now, but a lot of people don't know about, Um um, and there in the Blur Gallery now I mentioned it before was sharpening, but photo shop is kind of like the rings of a tree, you know, like a like an old redwood tree or something. You can see where we've progressed over time, and there's a lot of old filters in here w...

e talked about sharpen and some of the things you don't necessarily want to use when it comes to blur a lot of these a really powerful. But these Blur gallery features are the ones that are the most powerful and the most with the wig or what you see is what you get eso if I come in tow, Iris Blur and I want to soften things around Miles here. I'm just gonna put the pin wherever I want. And it's using the GPU, that very fast computer within a computer to show me everything on screen. So if I pull this up, I'm gonna see the background blurred. Now again, I think people dismiss this and they say, Well, that's not very precise. Um, that doesn't give me the exactly the control that I want. It's actually really precise. You just need to know how to use it. So the focused area is where the dot is. The outer oval is where it's at full strength. The inter pins are where the effect begins, and if I move those in, we'll see that the blur, the transition happens between them. So think of that area between them, is feathering. Now I'm gonna turn this up a little more just so we can see where the edges of this are. What a lot of people don't realize is that I can use the option or all key, and I can individually pull the pins so I can move those on their own. And this is the key to getting a much more precise a mask around it. Now, what I do is I dropped the pins where I want him, and then I'd back this down somewhere closer to reality like that. Okay, now, what's neat about this is I can do things that are photographically impossible, and I can have different areas that are in focus. So maybe I want his little hand to be in focus. I'm just gonna click on that and pull that pin in. And so now I've got it blurred everywhere except for his hand in his face. But I haven't totally overcooked it. So it's, you know, it's still believable. Um, if I hit the m key, I'm gonna see that I'm actually building masks as I go. So this could be a great way to blur. My image can also be a great way to visually create masks. Eso really, really neat feature for blurring things out. You can do quite a bit with it again. Love the IPhone, but you cannot get the thing to shoot, shall it up the field. The only way you can do it is if you crash focus on something that's like, three inches away. That's the only way the background is gonna fall out. So if you want to shoot a portrait of somebody, you're gonna need to soften it in post. The best way to do that is using iris player. It works really well. The next one I want to show you is this is kind of like turning the Komen to a brush. People say getting my ducks in a row, I don't. I just kind of stumble into these awful puns. I don't I don't intend to, but what we're going to do here is we are going to take all of these ducks on. We're gonna bring them onto focus now, kind of a ridiculous example. Let me show you what we're looking at here. This is I took this years ago in my dad's backyard. I have absolutely no idea why he has all these ducks here lined up on his hot tub. But I wanted to test this feature every time we come out with a new feature before I show it off before I work it in. I beat it up. I really do. And so I wanted to see if this focus blending really worked. The promise was that I could take a bunch of different images, focused on a bunch of different things and combined them into one image where everything was focused. Now I'm gonna show it to you as it works here, and then I'll explain the practical application because you're probably all thinking I don't have a row of ducks that I need to bring into focus. It's just not a problem I have. But let's use them as an example. Um Enbridge. And this is a great example of things bridge can do that other apes can't. I'm gonna shift click to multi, select these files. I'm gonna come with my tools and go down to photo shop, and I'm gonna say load files into Photoshopped layers. Okay. If you're not with me on using bridge yet this right here is a great reason to do it. Just so you know, you can also send files from late room multi select them and send them over to photo shop is layers. But I'm gonna do it from bridge load files into photo shop players. I do that. What's gonna happen is they're all going to open in photo shop is layers in the same document. And so the each come in there and we can confirm a couple things. One, all of our layers came in and to most certainly was not shooting on a tripod. So everything is way out of whack. I'm gonna shift click on the layers to select them all. And then I'm just gonna come over here to auto align layers. Don't worry about any of these checked boxes. Just trust that auto works. It's never failed me. It's a busy dialogue. Don't even just click, OK? And it's going to align everything and we're going to see that Yes, I was I was all over the place there with my composition, But everything is now perfectly aligned. What? That means us. If I talk to any of these, they're perfectly aligned with them. perfectly aligned, making sure that they're all selected. I'm gonna come here and I'm gonna say auto blend now Photoshopped and knows the difference between a series of images that make a panorama and a series of images that are very similar, that we want to stack together. And we've got some strange terminology here. Seamless tones and colors. All that's gonna do is it's gonna blend the tones and colors, stack images. It's gonna make sure that they're all blended together and content aware. Fill transparent areas. That's a new feature. And it's gonna fix all those gaps for me automatically. Very thoughtful. Click. Okay, it's gonna look at all that stuff. It's gonna chew through all of it. And hopefully I get everything in focus when we're done here. Yes. All right. Pretty cool. Now, is there a little bit blooming? Speculate Highlights? Yes. Was everything perfectly focused when I shot it? No, I think it's pretty remarkable that it did what it did. If you look closely on the right, there's a very detailed mask of each and everyone's. You can edit the results. I promised you guys a practical application of this. Here's to one. Um I'm shooting with a fast lens in low light, but I want more definite field, right? I don't have a lot of light, but I've got an F 1. lens, so I'm shooting it wide open. Got three people in a row, maybe its Ah, you know, a receiving line in a wedding. So I shoot multiple exposures at multiple focal range is then later I baked them altogether. I haven't compromised my image. It all, um I'm not really manipulating anything. I'm seeing what I saw, but I'm making it together, and I'm sort of buying light on the back end. Uh, the other And I bumped into this one. My wife makes high end custom jewelry, and she asked me to shoot a bunch of it and got a fancy macro lens to do that. But if you're shooting really close with a macro lens and you have, you know, kind of a large object, you can only focus on part of it. So, like, you try to shoot a watch or something and you try to get a macro image of it. You can't get the whole thing and focus. You can only get a little bit of it and focus unless you're shooting it straight on. But if you want any started perspective, you're gonna miss it. The way to fix that is to shoot, to do focus bracketing and to shoot a few different images and then baked them together. So it's actually a really useful feature. It's another one of those features that most people don't know exists, but as were appreciating the benefits of digital there, that, um, you don't necessarily spray and pray and take a ton of images your more thoughtful about what you do. But you can do more with the information that you gather the exposure information, Um, and in this case, the focal information. So a couple more All right, this one's really fun comes up a lot. Um, Brian, you're doing the some of the photos that got me to thinking in my limited experience doing HDR. It seems that I get a very different result from light room than Photoshopped. My understanding is that the same engine, but would there be a recommendation to use one over the other room? Why would they turn out different? Yeah, that's a That's a fantastic question. Um when it comes to HDR. Photo shop was always the place to do that and we actually changed it quite a bit in the CS five timeframe and the big thing that we put in there was the ability to remove ghosts. And I believe that the reason that people overcook their HD ours and they do this, I find it kind of offensive. This really halo we I've leaving. Thing is, they're camouflaging the halos, their camouflage in the ghost by introducing this over process look. So if the wind is blowing in, the grass is moving or the clouds are moving between exposures. They're masking it by doing that. So when we put in that fix and voter shop, a lot of people started going to photo shop for HDR because it was able to solve that problem. Now, in the latest version of light room in labour, MCC or light from six, we put that functionality in light room and I actually have ah thing in here and we'll talk about it in a minute. I'm gonna advocate doing your HD ours there. I think it's a friendlier place to do it. I think it's an easier place to do it. I think it's where your images already are. It's where you can make your tonal adjustments before or after, Um, push UPS solution has been fantastic, and if you're not using light room, it still is. But if you are using light room for your panoramas and your HD ours, I'm gonna advocate using light room. And the reason is the end result is a raw file. Unlike Photoshopped, which were pushed into pixels, your end result is a true raw file people get hung up on. Oh, but it's not a 32 bit file as faras, the way the file looks and what you can do with it, it's a much more flexible file. Um, that's a that other one's a debate. For another time, someone, somewhere on the line is lighting a torch, getting ready to rally the troops on the whole 32 bit crusade. We could talk about that another time. I'll show each year in a second. I'm glad you brought that up. Xterra is really cool. So what? I want to show with this one another great bridge workflow. I've got two images of these. These lions here, neither one is fantastic. But what I want is the lion on the right from this image and the lion in the middle from this image. A couple of problems with this one is that there zoomed differently, so it's gonna be kind of tricky. You know, I I shot this years ago, before I had kids. Now, every picture I take has this problem. When kids smiling in one picture that could smiling on the other one could sticking his tongue out. You put in more than two people and you've got even more. Here's how you fix it. This is a common problem. I think you guys will like this one. You take your files. Could be too. Could be 10. Uh, I'll show you how to do it from Photoshopped as well. Aside from bridge again. You could do this from Light Room is where you could send to files over his layers. We're gonna do just like we did with the last one. We're gonna load files into photo shop players. And there those are and different zooms. Same lions. We're gonna shift. Click. Those were gonna come over here to edit auto ally on, um, did it myself any. There's so many awful, awful puns of this. They're lined up now, And, uh, if I talk about this, you see, they're perfectly lined up. What it does, there's It looks for all the common content, uh, and that what we want to do is we just We're gonna I'm gonna crop this later. I don't I don't want it to look just like that, but I just want to cut through this one, so I'm gonna select the first layer again. That's the layer I want to cut through. And I'm gonna choose a mask. And for that mask, I'm just gonna get myself a brush. That's not the weird comb brush. Okay? Doesn't really matter what size, and I'm just gonna like that is gonna cut through it because the content is perfectly aligned. When I'm asked through there, I'm just going to reveal the one that's behind it. So if you want to take group shots and you want to isolate certain people, align them mast, um, cut through them and it works. Great

Class Description


Adobe’s Bryan O’Neil Hughes pioneered this popular YouTube series to solve common problems in Photoshop…in just minutes. Bryan will show his favorite shortcuts and tricks for troubleshooting Photoshop stumbling blocks. This course offers something for everyone and features a repository of takeaway content  


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2015

Reviews

Mike Thompson
 

I think this class was well worth it. I like that you are sharing this info, like the "secrets" so I can try them and have acquaintances ask, "how did you do that". It was great. Thanks!

user 12004e
 

Lots of good tips. Gets to some deeper aspects of the programs.