Skip to main content

How to Fulfill Reader's Expectations

Lesson 9 of 16

The Protagonist Will have a Past

 

How to Fulfill Reader's Expectations

Lesson 9 of 16

The Protagonist Will have a Past

 

Lesson Info

The Protagonist Will have a Past

The reader expects the protagonist to have a past. I want to just say that again. The reader expects the protagonist to have a past. One more time. The reader expects the protagonist to have a past. You know why? You know why the reader expects the protagonist to have a past? Because the reader expects the protagonist to be a human being and all of us have a past. The reader expects that that past is going to affect what they're doing in the moment. In fact the past is probably what caused what's happening in the moment to happen and the reader expects that past affect what's happening in the moment and also to affect what might happen in the future. In other words the plans and the action that your protagonist, or point of view character, carries out. This is true of every character. And writers have a really hard time. They'll go no, I'm gonna write forward. I kind of, I've thought a lot about my protagonist, a lot of thought. Again, if you think you know your protagonist or any char...

acter because you've thought about them a lot, you don't know anything. And the reason is because thoughts are inherently vague and in pieces and they're a bunch of what, and story is about why, not what. So you gotta start getting it down. But they'll go I'm gonna get to know my protagonist as I write forward. How can you do that? Because anything they do and anything that's happened to them will inherently be generic. They step onto the page with everything that their life has taught them, because we make sense of things as human beings based on one thing and one thing only. And that is what our past experience has taught us. Without that we can only be generic. And yet writers will go I'm gonna write forward, and know nothing about my protagonist's past. I'm gonna write a 327 page novel about the most important turning point in someone's life who I know absolutely nothing about. I mean why would you do that? And yet writers do it all the time. One way to look at story is to think of story as story is about how the present forces your protagonist to reevaluate the past and then see it differently in order to get what they want in the future. The past, to not put a fine point on it, the past is our decoder ring for the present. The past is our decoder ring for the present. And your reader expects that. Watch when you're reading, you don't read a novel and think oh this person just materialized right here, you know, tabula rasa, on page one. You know that they've got a past. I mean doesn't everybody always talk about the baggage we bring with us? I mean they have to unless you're writing about somebody who's like a AI or something, or a robot. And then whoever programmed them, we've probably got that person's past going on there. As Faulkner so brilliantly said, "The past isn't dead, the past isn't even past." And in fact this will be woven throughout your novel. The past is the most fundamental layer of story. It gives birth to your story as a matter of fact. So, and the reader expects it. And watch what you expect when you read.

Class Description

We’re hardwired to come to every story tacitly asking one question: what am I going to learn that will help me make it through the night? We’re looking for inside intel on how to best navigate the unpredictable, scary, beautiful world we live in. As a result, there’s a set of specific unconscious expectations readers have for every story — expectations that have nothing to do with the surface plot or how beautifully the story is written. By decoding your reader’s hardwired expectations – and how to meet them -- you’ll be able to create a story that will rivet readers from the very first sentence.

In this session you’ll learn:

  • The truth about the writing myths that are holding you back, and why story trumps beautiful writing every time.
  • What it is that actually hooks and holds readers, and how to create the underlying foundation from which a riveting story organically springs.
  • One by one, the specific expectations that readers bring to every story, which together create a set of guidelines that will help you keep your story on track.
  • Why, as a storyteller, you are one of the most powerful people on the planet.

Reviews

Emmanuelle Halliday
 

I appreciated the differentiation between plot and story. Inspiring and usefull throughout. Thanks Lisa.

Emmanuelle Halliday
 

I appreciated the differentiation between plot and story. Inspiring and usefull throughout. Thanks Lisa.

Annick Ina
 

I loved this class. I'm reading Wired For Story at the same time, and this course is a great way to introduce and somehow simplify the concepts before digging deeper and going into more detail in the book!