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Gigapan and Action Pano for Outdoor Photography

 

Innovative Techniques for Outdoor Photography

 

Lesson Info

Gigapan and Action Pano for Outdoor Photography

We're going to talk about the gig. A pen, the gig. Japan takes us another step in the size of a file. You want to make a really big file or you want to put this online where people can zoom in and find little things within your pictures? So get japan people came out with a number of different sizes of these. The biggest one here is professional will work up to ten pounds and it's got a little computer down at the bottom. This is for the smaller dslr ours. And then for the point shoots, they initially only had this one and I was able to do big panorama is with a point shoot camera. Even though they had a very tiny sensor and not very many megapixels. By the time you put all of these images together, it was pretty pretty cool. Now, with this unit here, I could put a camera on there up to four hundred millimeters and I take sections. We start up in the upper upper left corner and then we know where we want to stop in the lower right corner and we tell the camera what local in flynn's we h...

ave gay japan, we tell it what the focal length of the lenses and it then we tell it where to start. And and where it wants to stop, and it will then figure out how many images it takes toe overlap each one and the number of rows it's going to take, and it could be several hundred images, and it just takes them, and it has software that will put all of these images together. If you don't kick the tripod in the middle of it or something like that, you push the button, you step back and it just it's a computer, it basically takes all the images and that's a lot of things to do and, you know, may sound like a lot of money for nine hundred ninety five dollars, but what it does is incredible cannon, quite often at their big expositions, will put out a print that is five foot by twenty foot long, and you can walk up and see every detail within the picture. So here's a picture of bryce canyon and there's, an area on the other side where people stand it's, it's either sunrise or sunset point. And when you look at the overall picture there sixty five images making this up, and they're all of two hundred millimeters and you can actually see the people you don't have to, you can't quite see him enough where you need to run over there and get a release from each one of them. They're almost if I would have done this with the fifty megapixel or a thirty six megapixel camera, we probably would have to go get releases, but you khun post this on to the gig a pen website you can look at it on your ipad or on your computer, even your iphone, and you can then blow it up just with your finger blow it up to the point where you can see the little details and here's that area across the way. Here is another area that was off to the left and this these people we can actually identify in the image, so that gets to be kind of interesting just goto www dot giga pan dot or ge and look at the different images there's hundreds of thousands of images on their sometimes what you can do is you can if you're going to go someplace you can put in that area and then you come up with an image of somebody took there and zoom in and see different aspects of it and then you could take you can see down at the bottom here there are certain pictures that people say, I like that area you hit the button and it's makes us if it saves that spot, so the next person comes along clicks on that and it goes zoom in right to that spot pretty pretty interesting so the big japan also you can program it to take up to twenty some pictures at each position so I only use it for three pictures at each position to do an hdr so you could do it hdr giga pan so I'm at multnomah falls on the columbia river and it's kind of raining it's it's not so good I'm having to shoot it f twenty two because I need depth of field all the way from the bottom all the way to the top up here my wife kathy goes up here and she's standing on the bridge and she's wondering you know when am I going to photograph her? She doesn't I don't have a radio with me at this particular point but I took forty images but each one of them is three images because each one is two stops over on the money two stops under which gives me the hdr because of the I want to bring out the colors so we ended up with one hundred twenty images and the end result is it's pretty nice image and when you blow it up there she is waiting and wondering we can use these same techniques there's so many different ways all these techniques I'm talking about here today you khun make them work for what interests you and let's say that you're into flowers and you want to make big prints on flowers my wife and her office has fifty by forty by fifty inch prints of the insides of gerber daisies, several of them in her in her office, and you can walk up and see the pollen grains inside of it. And one of the ways we do that is we've taken this gig a pan and we've taken is one eighty macro that I mentioned earlier with a two x telly extender on the back of it that's three hundred sixty millimeters. It'll go all the way to two x, but we're back further, so we maintain it about one x so you can see the pictures that I've taken here. I've taken five, five rows and three pictures each and then when I crop it down, when you see here and it all comes together, the detail is fantastic and we could just move the camera. We don't have to do the aerial thing that we were talking about before here's, the type of panorama that happened by accident, and this is the first image that I ever did with this without even knowing it. I'm in butts, juana, I'm having lunch, we're standing outside the vehicles have seventy with a one to four hundred around my neck, and here comes a bunch of little baboons. And they want to run across this water and they don't want to get too wet, so they're really cut comical the way they tried to run across the top of the water so I would follow them and as they went across the water I would leave the motor drive going I'm looking for one shot where their action is something that I want I'm looking for that one action shot, so I followed him in a motor drives going the whole time each time that they went across I just followed them in them going in ten that camera was eight frames per second, so when I was looking at the images and this is one of those sets and this is actually every other image because if you took every image they would be overlapping each other one part of it they're not separated enough and I looked at those images and I said, well, that's kind of neat the way he was going across but then I saw the tree there and I saw the tree there and I saw the tree there and I said to myself, if I put that together as a panorama and then the positioning of the animal is going to be just perfect because the timing of the camera was going off at, you know once every eight or in this case once every fourth of a second and we have time and distance and action all going on in one action is something that I that started the first thing with an action sequence panorama and after that I started trying to do it on purpose. I even went back and found a few other images in my files where I had followed something with a motor drive in the motor drive it kept going all the way through and I actually made a couple of those into action sequence panorama is so here's doing it on purpose you know, I went to a uh uh trials we call it there's a there's a name for this where you take the dogs out and then they go through all of their shenanigans here jumping and going through these tunnels and everything like that. But as as the dog would go, I would start the motor drive and follow him all the way through and then maybe even get a chance to go to the second one in this big black poodle here and they would all go together because they overlap unusually it's every other image we now have cameras that go up the twelve frames per second you don't need that if you have a camera that does five or six frames for second and those were the less expensive the rebels, the less expensive night cons will do five or six friends for second without any problem so here are some examples this is molly now this was done on purpose. We took her out to the park, I knew that she would jump the hurdled, and as I followed her, I just kept doing it. She ran to her, the person who owns her and molly became an action sequence panorama now think of horses running think of ah, person jumping hurdles, you can use this in sports, you can use this in any number of ways to do an action sequence panorama, so take it to that. I'm always taking something to the next degree, so I met basketball, apache and I have the one d x, which is twelve frames per second, and they're following and I'm on a tripod and I'm leveled, and I follow these these cranes as they take off, and hopefully they'll stay fairly level if they go up and out of the picture everything's over, but this particular bird, I got twenty one images. Actually, I got three times that because I'm using every third image because we're doing twelve francs for second, so you could start to see here how far you can take something like this, the wings air up the wings or down. I mean, the timing was just right and you could make you could make a decision here, which every third one do you want, so that you make sure you have the wings going up in the wings going down, that type of thing? So there's your ending picture it's. A long print, actually, a print of this is hanging in the in bend at the desert, the desert museum high desert museum. They've got it long print up above on one of the ceiling areas there. So it really gives you an idea of what this bird looks like. Some people will look at this and say, how did you get all those birds lined up so perfectly when they flew, when they took off the same bird and every picture?

Class Description

It takes some serious skill to capture the magnificence of the great outdoors in a single still photograph. Find out how the pros do it in Innovative Techniques for Outdoor Photography with George Lepp.

George is one of North America’s best known outdoor and nature photographers. He is a leader in the rapidly advancing field of outdoor photography and digital imaging and in this class he’ll share innovative techniques for shooting outdoors. You’ll learn how to:


  • Create dramatic panoramas – from start to finish
  • Shoot with macro lenses
  • Achieve extended depth of field
  • Portray action like lighting strikes
  • Work with tele-extenders and HD video
  • Produce cinemagraphs

George will discuss the techniques behind some of his best-known photographs, sharing the secrets behind his celebrated images from Namibia, Chile, and more. You’ll learn about lighting, shooting, and editing high-quality images of wildlife, flowers, snowflakes, and landscapes.

If you want to create truly stunning images that capture the depth and complexity of a landscape, join George Lepp for Innovative Techniques for Outdoor Photography.