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Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 12 of 17

Camera Placement & Actor Blocking

 

Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 12 of 17

Camera Placement & Actor Blocking

 

Lesson Info

Camera Placement & Actor Blocking

So we learned a little bit about why we put the camera where we put it. Okay, in traditional film, traditional video, having the camera kind of on an angle, right, that Dutch angle. That means something for the audience having the camera on a shoulder cam instead of on sticks and seeing through maybe a ah out of focus curtain and seeing into the neighbor's window right that has a meaning for audiences. And, similarly, where you position the 3 60 camera that has meaning for the audience. So are they someone in the conversation? Are they 1/3 person in the room? Are they an Amish? Do they have an Amish in perspective of the scenario of the scene? All of that is dictated by where the camera sufficient, Or is the camera on its little feet that it came with? And is it sitting in the middle of the table? And then do people feel, you know, maybe your audience doesn't feel like, Oh, this is a natural spot for me because when I looked down and I don't have a body, I am a table right. That's not ...

a very good and not a very comfortable place for people to be very comfortable places for audience to be. So, um, you know one thing to really e think about here Is that the audience you want to respect your audience? You don't want to put your audience in an uncomfortable situation. You don't want to put your audience in a situation where they feel even more vulnerable, right? Already, when you strap in tow a VR headset, you're cut off from the world you are. There is a level of vulnerability that comes with being inside VR and forcing your audience to be on the lip of a skateboard. Great as it barrels down a hill. That is a really tough spot to put your audiences head in. And you're putting your audiences perspective down on the asphalt as it moves quickly. Or, um, you know, putting your putting your audience maybe next to attaching into some sort of big dig or a big rig, you know, earthmover machine, right? People don't want to put their heads next to those sort of shovels. You'd rather be a person driving the tractor, be a person standing next to the person driving the tractor. You know we want to just think of our audience and think about respecting our audience. Um, and I think that if you treat the camera as a human, just always treat your camera as a human will be best served now. What we did a little bit with with Kate and with Chris was we talked about blocking. And there's this concept in VR that's it's there in traditional film, but it's even more powerful NVR, where the proximity of the subject to the camera so how close the subjects are to the camera is very influential to the experience of the audience. So if someone is really close in the foreground, they're really close to the camera. The audience assumes that person is of interest, and as someone moves to the background, right, just like in film, that would be sort of less less of interest. Less primary. However, in VR, you don't have an opportunity to jump around a room with close ups. The audience has a position like a human would in that space, and so it's even more powerful that proximity to the camera even matters that much more than it does in traditional film. Because you're locked into that space, you're not able to bounce around. And so as you think about developing and designing and choreographing the blocking, that would happen in a VR film. It's really important to think about foreground as opposed from background and where in the sphere you are. So are you always north and does all do all your shots? Sort of start with your main primary subject north to the lens, Or do you move around where the next shot might start here and then the next shot might start here. Um, you know, and all of that is to think about what would be best for the audience. Not how can I make things happen in a circle, but what would be best for the audience?

Class Description

Imagine a world where you can create a product for your client where they are immersed in a memory or place; a bride & groom that are able to relive the feeling of their first kiss, a real estate agent that can place clients in their virtual home, a journalist that can transport a viewer in a small village in a foreign country. That world is here, and it’s growing quickly. 


360 Live-Action is a form of photography and videography that allows the viewer to see an entire world. With social channels like Facebook and YouTube adopting ways to publish this medium, the creative world has exploded with new opportunities to share new immersive stories. 

Barry Pousman has been playing with virtual reality for years. His stories and media have been used by such organizations as the U.N. and Google to evoke empathy in viewers with the hope of creating a positive behavioral change. In this course, Barry will introduce you to the world of possibilities created by 360 and VR.
You’ll learn:

  • What exactly VR and 360 Live-Action are and the history behind each of them
  • How you can get started in photography and videography to create stories in 360 Live-Action
  • How to develop, plan, shoot, and stitch together a story in 360 Live-Action
  • How you can enter the market place and participate in the growing world of VR and 360 

Reviews

user-5f6365
 

Great content! Great overview on storytelling and an intro to 360.