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The Lightspeed Workflow System

Lesson 23 of 23

General Q&A

 

The Lightspeed Workflow System

Lesson 23 of 23

General Q&A

 

Lesson Info

General Q&A

This is from Gray Pegasus. What factors are you considering when using the spray can presets or going to photo shop? Um, main thing I'm considering is having a little bit of practice with my presets, to know kind of ahead of time. What? I'm looking for style wise. So when you have presets or you buy presets, play with them, play with a bunch of them on different images and see what they do and you'll have a pretty good idea. And then I'm just looking for a theme that fits like for this particular one. This creme dela creme preset, my Lightman preset, worked beautifully, had the style, the look that I wanted for her images. It's worked. So that's kind of the first thing I do is I try to pick one that's kind of consistent, and then I'll make slight changes, maybe, and some of them throughout as we're working on him. But overall, I want to feel to be consistent. I'm kind of thinking about what I already know about the presets I have, but then also taking time to experiment and find someth...

ing that might work. Great. Awesome. Thank you. And then this is from Donald. How do you handle photos for your portfolio when you're working in one catalog per shoot? So say you wanted to keep some of these images for your portfolio, maybe this one in this one, and that there's a couple ways to do that. If you get those five stars that will we talked about earlier, that could be your portfolio images. And what you could do is to export these to a separate catalog, just those three that you have selected and send them to a portfolio catalogue, a different catalogue, or to send them to a folder where all these images are now. Remember, if we make D and G's of images, that's all compacted. It's all together there. Um, do you want to send all the images? Or maybe if its portfolio, you really just want higher is of that image to be used for whatever you want on that case, I'm going to skip over this, but exporters catalog. What it does is it takes whatever images you have selected and sends them off to a new catalogue, basically all the same information by themselves so you wouldn't have all the others. Just those three. And that could be maybe your portfolio. Just keep adding stuff to that. Is your portfolio catalogue a separate catalog? Uh, or you could just take those images, um, and use a high rez preset like a high quality of J Peg or even in originals export. But we didn't create that one. So let's create that when I have one in my other folders, but we don't create one together. So let's create an originals export where you would send the absolute most information about an image with it. So that would be close to your print ready J. Peg. But instead of making a J peg will choose original. That means of it's Photoshopped stays photo shop, but it if it stays photoshopped DMG, it stays in the N G. Wherever you send it. Alright doesn't give you an option to downsize because you can't just gonna keep it original. Then I'll make that into a preset click on add and local original format and the Kev main folder. So now I could take those three images so export with preset original format and put them in my cloud station inside a folder called Portfolio Cloud Station. those You've been with me here, All right? No, it's like a drop box, but it's linked to the cloud if I wanted to, but more importantly to my own server in my office, so I can add as much as I want having to pay for extra storage space. And we could keep a single foal or a folder of portfolio images and just send those there when we're done. And there they are. So their original tiffs air right here as copies in the Cloud Station folder. And that's gently. What I do is I have a folder of ah ah on online accessible folder of all my portfolio images in the original format so that I can repurpose them. But I don't necessarily have to put in light room catalog, but you could make a catalogue and then put those in its You have a portfolio catalog and then all your separate job catalogues, which works pretty nice, great. And then from Donna two lanterns do you create to slide shows a short teaser and a long and a long one versions Well, yeah, the animados, a short teaser one, because that was kind of fun. It's it's moving images and stuff. It's not one that you want to order from. You don't want to put images in the an Emoto. It's just a That's the short teaser that works great for that when they come into this to the studio. I don't want all the motion and crazy stuff going on. I just want boom, clean images with music. I had to sit down and for them to see the full image, appreciate it and then place an order from that. So, yeah, we do have a short teaser video and then also the the full size light show. Great. Can we got one last question from the Internet from Shenandoah? Does Kevin have a set up to show a client? What picture framing, matting and various materials and colors might look like by using photo shop so they can preorder photos with frames and printing from shops? Yeah, there's a There's a great program that doesn't called pro Select. What we have heard of that and that lets you actually load pictures of real frames, even your pictures of your wall in your office, and you can project images right into that so that you can size it in everything that makes it look like the actual print on the wall. That's a great program for doing that. I mean, you could, of course, just have an actual picture of your frame, keep a collection of those in photo shop and then drop the image into that, do that little manually. And of course, I would find a way to make templates and automate that was gonna do that. But we use Pro Select for that kind of frame simulation. It's great software. Yeah, it is really cool. I love that I love the software. The amazing Yeah, the fact that's one of the coolest thing is just showing people. Here's what it actually looked like in the frame out of 16 by 20 size, which is sometimes hard for them to visualize. Ho. Well, that's really not very big 16 by 20 when you're thinking about over the fireplace, you know? Yep, that's for sure. All right, well, I'm looking over at our studio audiences and their brains looking like they're about to explode. They look full. You got any last questions? Great. Yeah. I noticed you before saving need from Photoshopped to light from getting planet foot in the average you don't do that for. Yeah, I don't flatten it for the very reason of I may want to come back and find Tune it. So, for example, the books shot say, if they ordered that I want to find Tune it I just All I need do is command to eat at it original, and it brings it back with all the layers because I may want to say, Well, not me. Clean up the layer of the edges are on the books a little bit. Mawr maybe I want to move this particular book. Um, that's in the custard cream one. I can't do that one here, but I want to move that particular book somewhere else. I could do that now, because I have the layers. Always preserve my layers, and I think it's a really good idea. If you do any kind of layering working Photoshopped, there's no need for you to flatten it, because when you send a tow light room, it's going to save the layered file. But when you export your final version from light room, Vinick flattens it to a J pig. But the original is still there. So I can always go back to the original, make more modifications if I need to. So there's really no need unless you're just desperately low on file storage space. And that's a pretty sad situation if you have toe flattened to save storage space because he really should protect yourself by keeping all your layers only flatten if it really technically is necessary to flatten it, another to keep working. But things like this I would never flat okay, kind of same thing, cause I've Well, we're we've been instructed to do, um was to flatten your image will, when you're Yeah, I guess when you're getting ready, the print Sometimes it old it might have the hiccups or something like that. I mean, have you ever ran across the back? I guess you don't necessarily print yours in house, but I don't. But here's the thing. If you if you're using light room and that what we're talking about in this course here, uh, if I try to print from this from light room, it doesn't care if it's a layered file. I can print it directly from light room. Or, most likely, I'm gonna create a J pig copy of it that will send to a lab for print. They're never gonna get the layered file. I'm gonna send in the J peg copy, but you can print directly from light room. We really talk about it, but it's fully possible. And like, room is a pretty good job of printing directly with the print module on here. Of course, you can select your printer, the borders, the size and all that sort of stuff. Just print directly. So if you have an inkjet connected print directly from light room, you can choose your printer or J pic file to print to and bubble all the options right here. If you actually gonna print your own and you're saying you would, you would against make a virtual copy and flattened that or in light room. You don't need Tonto behind the scenes I'm printing, and so it doesn't have to be flattened. Anything. Get a print in your focus. Cadaver light room will treat it. Basically flatten it as a JP in the background as it sending it to print. But you never have to deal with that. You just you still have the original layer tiff or PSD file. But it will not affect the printing versus that's being a J peg file, because light room's gonna treat it like a J pig when it since it out to print anyway. Se saves you step in time. Do it that way. Yeah, oddly enough that you finish all your process. Do you save old your picture Society J. Bacon, a folder on your computer afterwards. We just keep them in live from June, do you from? Because light rooms keeping their D and G's Ross. All the adjustments we made are there. D and G is much higher quality JPEG. And if I ever need to go back and re adjust anything again, the fact that it's in light room is a raw file. Say later on you decide this raw file that we have right here. I don't want this to look this way. I want to change the look. I could simply select it and undo can shift our undo those color adjustments and bring it back just a normal straight image. But if you had a J peg, you couldn't do that. You have to go dig up the raw file, bring it back in and figure out what you did to undo it. So there's no need to export everything is a J peg to archive it. Just keep him. Uh, exactly the system we've had as the original raw and tiff files. They're modified in photo shop because I was instructed to do like after you finish your process, do export everything to stage a pick and a file. And you say there for the client later. I don't need to. That's not unless you're unless you're gonna give all the J pigs to the client. Some photographers do that like you give high res files to the client. But then you would use the same export processing that we did export with high rez J Peg like he did for your lab here. Print ready J pegs. You could pop those in a folder and sell or give them to your clients if that's what you do. But for your personal archiving, there is Yeah, you have to make no sense. There's no no reason to do that because you've got the highest quality original masters right here in your raw files that we imported exactly where they are on these two drives and hopefully lot backed up to a backup as well. So you don't need to any more steps After this, you're done and you're safe.

Class Description


When you consider what separates good photographers from great photographers, words like “artistry” and “versatile” might come to mind — but “efficient” is just as important. Join Kevin Kubota for a course that will equip you with a seamless, productive Lightroom and Photoshop workflow.

Kevin will take the stress and frustration out of capturing, saving, and editing images. You’ll learn about creating and protecting an image database that allows you to find the image you need when you need it. You’ll build strategies for working efficiently without sacrificing your creativity or the quality of your images. You’ll leave this course with concrete, step-by-step instructions that will help you be more productive in every step of your process, from image capture to output.

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This course was really helpful for me to speed up my workflow. It gave me ideas about how to keep things organized and backed up, making me more efficient and my images safe.