Skip to main content

Types Of Logos

Lesson 10 from: Logo Design Fundamentals

Mark Sposato

Types Of Logos

Lesson 10 from: Logo Design Fundamentals

Mark Sposato

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

10. Types Of Logos

Lesson Info

Types Of Logos

let's discuss the anatomy of a logo. We'll talk about some terminology and get into use cases. So pretty much all logos can be broken into three main categories. Word marks, letter marks or symbols. The word mark is also known as a logo type. It's a logo that's entirely made of lettering or type execution. Remember lettering and type are two different things. Lettering is created letter forms as opposed to a font, which is a typeface that you get from the computer. A word mark works really well when a company has a distinct or memorable name. Typography or lettering style is really important in this case and it must capture the spirit of the brand. Word marks are also good for new businesses that want to get their name out there. Letter marks or initial ISMs use the initial of the words that comprise the name of the company. So consider using letter marks. When a company has a longer name may be comprised of a series of words because you want to shorten it into something that's easily ...

digestible symbols are graphic marks or images that represent a brand. If they become recognizable enough, they can stand on their own without supporting type. That identifies the name symbols are tricky because the single image must convey what the company does graphically. You only have one shot to do this and they're usually used with a company. That's a very established brand. Sometimes this can be a result of simplifying a more complex logo. An example is Nike dropping the type from their lockup. The swish is now entirely Oh, noble and recognizable as the Nike brand. Consider using symbols for a global brand where language translation might be a barrier or if you're depicting an emotion or an idea. These main categories can be further divided into six sub categories there. The monogram, the pictorial mark, the abstract mark, the mascot logo, the combination mark and finally the emblem, A monogram as the name implies, is simply a letter mark that uses just one letter. They can be stark and minimal or decorative and stylized. True monograms only use one letter. An example would be Honda or Mcdonald's but the term is loosened up over the years to include two or more initials in a proper name as well. An example of this would be the Giorgio Armani logo that uses the G. And the a. Together symbols can be subdivided into pictorial marks, which represents specific recognizable objects, abstract marks which use non representational geometric or impressionistic shapes. Mascot marks which depict a character or mascot associated with the brand. Pictorials are not the best idea. If a company might change its name or business model in the future, abstract marks are hard to do well, so they are not recommended for beginners, but they score a lot of points for uniqueness and originality mascots usually appeal to Children or family friendly brands. Combination marks or combined word marker, letter mark and a pictorial, abstract or mascot. These are probably the most versatile choice because they check all the boxes, emblems consists of fonts or type treatments inside a symbol or icon. Think badges, seals and crests. They usually have a traditional feeling but can be intentionally modernized. Consider using these for public institutions, agencies or food and beverage companies.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Course Downloads

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES