Skip to main content

Preparing for Outdoor Macro

Lesson 6 from: Macro Photography: Insects and Plant Life

Chris McGinnis

Preparing for Outdoor Macro

Lesson 6 from: Macro Photography: Insects and Plant Life

Chris McGinnis

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

6. Preparing for Outdoor Macro

Next Lesson: Camera Settings

Lesson Info

Preparing for Outdoor Macro

Before you head into the field to shoot macro, you want to make sure you're appropriately prepared. So, dress accordingly. Think about going out to shoot macro like you're going on a hike. You're gonna be out in the woods, experiencing the elements, and you wanna protect your skin, and allow yourself to move around. So, starting with a long sleeve lightweight shirt, long pants, long socks, and boots. Make sure your boots are something that you're gonna be comfortable in walking around all day, but also something that's going to protect your feet, and protect you against water. If you step in some mud or along a creek, you wanna make sure that your feet stay dry, but you're still able to get the shot that you're trying to get. If weather does turn for the worst, it's a good idea to have a raincoat on hand. This is something you could leave in the car, or stuff in your backpack. It's also important to protect yourself from the sun, so wear sunscreen, and wear a hat. You also might want t...

o bring a small bottle of glycerine-water mix. This is great to create water droplets. You can spray or use a syringe to add water droplets to a leaf or the stem of a flower, to add visual interest to your photos. Also don't forget to bring along your lens cloth to keep your lens clean, some duct tape of the photography world with a small roll of gaffers tape. I always make sure I have a flashlight in my bag or in my pocket to spot subjects at night, or just to help with focusing. If you wanna take it up a notch, you can add a headlamp to the equation for spotting spiders or other wildlife at night. Always bring a couple of zipper bags with you, just in case you need to put anything away that can't get wet. When you're outside shooting and things are going well, the last thing you wanna do is take a break for lunch. So, never get caught hungry or thirsty, always have some snacks and water on hand. Since you're going to be spending a lot of time outside shooting macro, it's a good idea to have some extra clothes. Bring an extra shirt, extra pair of pants, change of socks. That way if you do get soaking wet or filthy, you have something to change into and you can keep on shooting.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

10 Tips for Getting Started
Mobile Apps for Macro Photography
Settings for Macro Photography

Free Bonus Materials

E-M1 Mark II Macro Settings
E-M1X Macro Settings
Chris McGinnis Olympus Camera Settings

Ratings and Reviews

Andrew Lamberson
 

I found the class both very informative and very motivational to get started in Macro photography. It is an entry-level class but it explains what you really need to know to be successful. I especially found the information on the value of using flash and how to modify your flash for it to be more effective especially helpful. I am an experienced wildlife photographer and have done some "Macro" with my telephoto lens, but this class motivated me to purchase a dedicated lens. I am really looking forward to spring and finding some good bugs!

Chris Baudec
 

Great presentation and great motivation in the post processing. I do wish that the would have been made available. After all, this is a Olympus sponsored event, and Oly settings are always welcomed.... and a tad difficult on the learning curve.

Gary Hook
 

Chris does a commendable job of explaining his techniques, reasons and potential pitfalls to avoid. Very thorough and much more enthusiastic about little bugs than I will ever be :-) but at the end one has a good concept on how to approach the task at hand. Nice closing with his practical examples of 'post' shoot production. One suggestion for inclusion would be some operating tips/techniques with a tripod/macro rail slider. His Olympus is way smaller/lighter than my Canon 5D so my hand holding will be at a minimum. Well done. Thank you

Student Work

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES