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Mobile Food Photography

Lesson 5 of 5

Common Questions and Mistakes

 

Mobile Food Photography

Lesson 5 of 5

Common Questions and Mistakes

 

Lesson Info

Common Questions and Mistakes

So what I want to dress at as we sort of got through our shooting section and we worked with the phone and we worked a little bit with editing is some of the common mistakes that we make when we're shooting, whether that be with our phones or with our, um, our DSLR there any camera. But I think there's a couple of things we referenced earlier when I was doing the shooting demo when I was showing you how shooting with the angle of the light and understanding that if you shoot with your back to the light, it's akin to shooting with the with the flash on camera, which, obviously, at this stage of food photography, everybody understands that shooting food with flash on camera is not really a good idea on ultimately understanding why is really important? It's on. It's really great to understand that if you're shooting with the light, everything gets flat and we gave you an example of that earlier. Some of the other things that we often do is we don't plan are shoots. We kind of go at it wit...

hout really understanding whether the environment isn't gonna be the right environment. the lighting isn't gonna be the right lighting. We don't have the props or maybe the facility to shoot the food the way we want or the plating. Any of that really is about planning. And it doesn't really matter what phone you're carrying in your pocket. It's about the execution. And then, of course, the food itself. If you choose great ingredients, you're going to get better pictures. So the propping and the shopping, uh, all kind of go together in making it so that you can make photos that you're really proud of. And again, if you have great light and you have great props and you have a good plan on you understand your lighting and your angles and the things that you want to accomplish when you go into a photo shoot, the tool in your pocket, the phone, the camera around your neck. None of that really matters. You can make great photos if you have all of those things at your disposal, so that brings us to a close on mobile food photography for today. But remember everything that we've learned today, whether it be how we shot or how we edited or the software we used or the different tools that we put into play. Everything that is in your tool kit is gonna help you make better photos every day.

Class Description

AFTER THIS CLASS YOU’LL BE ABLE TO:

  • Understand differences and similarities of shooting with a mobile phone versus DSLR
  • Utilize techniques for image processing within a mobile workflow in Adobe Lightroom
  • Optimize your photos with new gear and software on a small budget
  • Deal with low indoor light by using inexpensive lighting equipment

ABOUT ANDREW'S CLASS:

In this course, award-winning food photographer Andrew Scrivani will show you how to create and tailor your own lighting setup using only your mobile phone and a select few pieces of gear — on any budget. Whether you’re a beginning photographer looking to understand mobile food photography or a professional photographer eager to expand your services, this course will give you a candid, comprehensive playbook for using your mobile phone to take and process photographs within a mobile workflow.

WHO THIS CLASS IS FOR:

  • Beginners wanting a better understanding of mobile food photography
  • Professionals wanting to expand their repertoire
  • Bloggers who write about food but need high-quality images to go with their written content

EQUIPMENT USED:

iPhone 11 Pro
Olloclip Lenses

Reviews

Fotomaker
 

Andrew is a very talented food photographer. The title of his recent book says it all... The way he shows the impacts of different lighting, different "camera" (iPhone 11) directions or orientations relative to a light source, different types of lenses and ways to process captured images in this quickie roughly 45 min. class is very practical to get someone started with mobile food photography. He's also got a likable, pleasant personality - which plays a big factor for me when viewing online (or, any) classes. He's not over-hyped or condescending and his voice is a pleasant tone & well-paced (which is important to me because I've watched some CL classes with people who are the antithesis of that and had to stop watching the content). I've bought a few of Andrew's CL classes for ongoing reference. And, after getting introduced to his work, via CL, I now follow him on Instagram.

a Creativelive Student
 

Nice short little course with simple and straightforward instructions.

Michael Buse
 

Well presented, in formative, but I'm old school and I want my camera. I am always up for well-crafted food porn.