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Natural, Realistic Retouching in Photoshop: Photoshop CC

Lesson 1 of 9

Class Introduction

 

Natural, Realistic Retouching in Photoshop: Photoshop CC

Lesson 1 of 9

Class Introduction

 

Lesson Info

Class Introduction

today we get to do something that I do. About 2% of the time. I'm in my images and that's go to photo shop. So it kind of strange that someone who spends so little time and Photoshopped would be teaching a class on editing and photo shop. And the reason that I'm teaching the class is so that I can teach you how to spend less time and photo shop. That a good idea for everybody. Okay, so photo shop is not a place where we want to camp out and hang out. The photo shop is something that is a tool for us to use to make sure that we get our images perfected the way they need to be perfected, but not end up spending our entire lives doing it And photo shop has just gotten better and better and better. I I used photo shop one, so that's where I learned. It's on photo shop one and back then you didn't have layers and you didn't even have, like, undo. So you you had to save a new copy every time you wanted to have an undo. Your undue was to go open the other copy the original one. So it was. I'm...

grateful that we have come so far, but also there's hazard in the amount of stuff you can do in photo shop because you're tempted to do it. And so we're gonna talk about what's important, what's not important, what we should do in Photoshop, um, and where to draw the line between good and too much. Um, so that's where we're going to go. But first, I wanted to go to a question that we got from the classroom here before we started. So the question was, Who you asked the question. No, you who asked the question, All of you. So there was the four over here. We're asking the question about the course graphic. And the question was, um is that really a sun burst in the course graphic in the center there? Or is that something that you somehow put in or is a Flasher? And the thing that I found interesting about the question is that because we're working in a photo shop class, the assumption was that I was lying. That's an interesting point. So you can if I told you I photoshopped my life, you would assume that I told a lie, and I had kind of given you like some some kind of story about my life that didn't actually exist and wasn't true and was augmented and looked better than it really. Waas. So the word photo shopped, or the verb Photoshopped has actually come to mean telling untruth in your photograph. So the answer to your question is, no. That's just exactly the way it was. The son happened to be gleaming just off of some piece of metal on that on that gate, and it kind of sailed through a za burst of light. So it's absolutely unfold a shop, which is funny that that was chosen as the graphic for the course because there's no photo shop work on that whatsoever. But I think the question was really instructive, and that's why I pass it on to the the Internet audience, because we want to tell the truth a smudge as possible. So here I'm going to start with a quote from Ansel Adams and Ansel, Adams said, and I'm This may be an exact quote, or it may be a slight paraphrase, but it's pretty accurate to the intent he said that the photographer is Onley successful to the extent that he can hide his hand now. He wasn't talking about photo shop. He was talking about four by five and eight by 10 cameras, and he was talking about lighting and watching for the light, and he was waiting for the late. It's not like he was, you know, putting a flash on the Grand Tetons and like lighting. And he was just waiting for the light. But his point waas that when you are able to fool the public or of the viewer into thinking that whatever it was was exactly the way what? So if I walked into the scene, this is what I would see. If you can convince me of that, then you're successful regardless of whether you're lying or knocked. So my goal in photo shop is always to hide my hand. I don't want anyone to think I've Photoshopped anything. I wanted to be reality, even if it's not OK. So if you understand that about what I do, you'll understand why I spend most of my time in light room and then I go to photo shop only occasionally when absolutely necessary because I'm gonna try and get the shot right at the camera. And then I'm going to use light room to do any augmenting that needs to be done to the photograph. Usually that's the style of the color ization of the photograph and the brightness in the contrast and even burning and dodging is mostly done inside of light room. Now that we're at, like from C. C. Used to be in light room, I think it might have been three or before. If I really want to do some good burning and dodging, I needed to go until Toe Photoshopped to do that. But now I have really great control inside of light room. I even have masking controls inside of light room. And so I'm gonna try and do as much as I can inside of light room in a non destructive environment before I go into photo shop, where I start to move pixels around and kind of mess the file of up

Class Description

So you know how to use Adobe® Photoshop®, but are you overusing the program, creating unrealistic images and more importantly, wasting your time? Join Jared Platt, an industry post-production expert to learn how to use Adobe Photoshop efficiently to create beautiful and realistic retouched images.  


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2015

Reviews

JIll C.
 

I really enjoy Jared's practical, matter-of-fact teaching style, and I learned a lot in this class about using Lightroom for the majority of edits, and reserving Photoshop for just those edits that can't be done in LR or aren't efficient in LR. He also reiterated the importance of "keeping it natural", particularly with regard to portraits. Very useful course !

user-1c544c
 

Jared is a great presenter. Gets you to think about both your photographic objective as well as the steps to get there. Good hints on both Photoshop retouching and use of Lightroom as part of the process.

Wen Chien Hu