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Photoshop: Adobe® Camera RAW

Lesson 15 of 15

Final Q&A and Wrap-Up

 

Photoshop: Adobe® Camera RAW

Lesson 15 of 15

Final Q&A and Wrap-Up

 

Lesson Info

Final Q&A and Wrap-Up

Would it be okay if we go back and ask you some overall questions? Sure. All right. Cool. What? We got dressed. What do we got? We have a question from Marianne Asbury from Salem, Oregon. Who asks, Can you watermark batches of photos in a camera? Not that I know of. Nothing. I know of one thing that you might do click done to get out of this. Over here in bridge, you do have excess Teoh. A lot of tools that were Chang'e that were calm. Batches of photos. One of those tools that is available in the tools menu is called Image processor Image Processors. A script that's been around since forever. It was written by Russell Brown. Uh, here you can actually input copyright info. I thought you could add a watermark here, but I might be thinking of description. Elements has a watermark feature. Let me see. I look one more spotted bridge and that you cannot do it in camera raw, but you might be able to do it over here in bridge processor batch. Maybe it's the batch window I'm thinking about. No...

, not seeing it. Okay. In a question from Steven Sylvester Is there any way to step back? More than one adjustment the latest, for example, vignette ing back to toning back to Buchan Way, etcetera and reverse. And then Steven says, Am I going to get another Lisa? Emphatic. Negative. It's funny. You say that. Native, right? Oh, okay, Lets to see. All right, So let's back out. Well, let's just go ahead and let's go into the grayscale panel. Let's convert this rock to gray scale. Kind of looks like the flat irons and boulders from the interesting Let's go over to our split town panel. Let's do some stuff over here. Let's change this to the Blue Room. Teoh seven. Pump of our saturation A little bit in the shadows in the highlights. Let's say we like that. Now let's go Ad and ed vignettes from our effects panel. There we go. So now if I press, undo a minute and do the edge men yet the keyboard shortcut in photo Shaw for stepping backward through history panel is commands Ear Control Z on a Mac, plus another modifier. He, which is the option key or alter on the PC. So let's to see if it works. Yep, so I was able to step backward through that. So the keyboard shortcut on a Mac is command options E so on a PC that would be control Ault Z. So basically, you're gonna hold down control and all, or command an option. And then you're just going to keep tapping the Z key to keep stepping back through all those states. And I bet you that is directly mapped to the number of history states that you've got set up in Photoshop under the preferences, which I believe is 20 or 25 straight from the factory. So yeah, great. Great questions. Br Coleman from Chicago is wondering when you want to smooth skin and not sharpen. How do you handle sharpening when you want to smooth out skin? Do using plug ins? Or can you do it directly from camera? You could do it here in camera raw. It's every image is going to need to be sharpened a little bit just to make it look a little bit more clear. Okay, so it's okay to apply Scharping to the whole image. Even if it's portrait, you wouldn't want to apply a you know, a truckload of sharpening just a little bit. And then he could go back in using the adjustments brush and applying more. Sharpening Teoh specific areas such as eyes, perhaps hair, maybe the lips eyelashes so you could come in and do selective sharpening, so you'd give it a low dose of global sharpening. And you come in and do selective sharpening on the areas that you wanted to accentuate in a portrait. That's how I do that. The question in the audience, Yes, what's the difference in clarity in sharpening is a good question. Sharpening is emphasizing all the edges in the image, so edges are areas that it determines to the high contrast. So we're really like pixels meat, really dark pixels. Clarity is, is kind of doing the same thing, but it's only doing it to the mid tones in the image. In case if you think about all the colors in your image are between zero, which is pure black and 2 56 which is pure white, your midterms fall somewhere in between. So that's your 50% graze. You know that kind of range. That's where clarity is focusing is on the mid tones, whereas sharpening that is looking for edges. Okay, we've got Let's see Rob Barnes from Reno, who asks when you finish doing everything you need to do in a CR do you save your images as PSD d and G's tiffs or what I need to do with, um, after the fact, most the time I just click done okay, depends on what I need to do with that image. If I'm gonna use it on the Web, you know, I might bring it into photo shop and resize it so that it's not honking big. And then I would say that is as a PNG for peeing or J pigs. If I need to descend it Teoh print shop, it is going to go on press. Then I would probably save it is a PSD and just give the press the PSD file. It just depends on what you're going to do with the image where it's headed. If you're gonna output it. You know what kind of format is that person line? You know, that's great. But once I get him in the photo shop, let's say I needed to edit this further in footage shot. Maybe I wanted Teoh, uh, put this in part of a creative collage. Just one of the things that you're not gonna be able to dio in a raw editor like light room aperture or cameras. You cannot combine images in any way. You can only work with one image at a time, which means no collages, which means no building up texture in an image through the use of multiple images. So once I get it in the photo shop, then I immediately save it as a PSD file so that my master remains intact and I have all of my layers and then from using photo shops, file save as command. I export different file types depending upon how I'm out putting it in what format that person wants. Great question, Rob. So it s going in terms of workflow building on that, a shark DVR in Charlotte. And what about multiple variations of the same image? So you would do that elsewhere? No, there's actually a panel here in camera Ross beyond the scope of this class. But there is a panel called snapshots. I think it's this guy right here where you can save versions of your image that you can get back. Teoh? Yeah, probably works the same way as Pre says. There's a little a piece of paper with a dog, your corner at the bottom, right? So you could use that feature to do that over in photo shop. It's called a player. Cops know layer cops, I think Blair comes. I can take a peek everywhere I go say open image window layer cops. That's one way to do it and photo shop. Another way to do it in photo shop is to open your history channel, and you've got the same kind of thing here Seattle camera icon that lets you save snapshots of your image in different states, Which is great if you're in the experimentation process. Let's say you created a black and white, then you created a dio tone, but you don't know which one you're gonna like better. You don't wanna have to undo all your steps, and you want to duplicate a slew of layers and your layers panel. Then you could save different states of your image. Then you could use the history panel to quickly get back to those states without having to recreate everything that you did. That is great. Um, have any other questions for anyone here in the audience? Think information is amazed. They are at the power of camera raw and how easy it is to correct color and lighting and even makes a beautiful artistic effects with your images. And it's all non destructive. So there's just no way you can mess up anything. No, our it's fantastic. I love that aspect of it. All right, well, wait, Um, All right, well, thank you so much for such a jam packed day. Not only today, but a jam packed week is always super fun to have you here. So let's give Lisa Snyder a big round of applause. Thank you so much.

Class Description

Lesa Snider takes a deep dive into the power of  Adobe®'s Camera RAW tools.

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