Build your Lighting Knowledge

 

Lesson Info

Live Shoot: Remove Big Pupils from Subjects

So, Wescott has these, I don't know what they are, my flex kit is designed by Wescott so they make these little strips, like this big. But they make these little strips, like this big and you can, put it at the key, what are you doing? Wait, do the one by (group laughing) John, I want a one by three. What are you doing? Do the one by three, where did it go? They're all taken off set. All right, I'll. You want to use this one or you want one by three? I'd really like the one by three. (group laughing) I mean I can use that, gimme that, I'll use that. Just don't bonk him in the head with it when you walk by him, I'll use that. Just don't hit him in the head, here we go, all right. All right. Let's see this, turn this bad boy on. Okay, hold that, give me about, what do you got? Twenty. 20, give me, give me, go 30 on me. Go 30 on me. You got 30 on me? There you go, hold that, let's see. Give me 50, I'm just going to change the ISO guys. Everybody settle down again, all right, h...

ere we go. Let's try this, there you go, good, hold that, right there, why not? (camera snaps) Good, let's see how this looks. I got more real estate, didn't I, it's a little dark. I went dark, can you give me 50? Get me some light in there, is that 50? That's why I was wondering what the one by two story is? All right, hold that right there, hold that. Not so miserable, come on and tilt your head a little bit this way, hold there, good. We'll just keep it straight, chin down a little bit. Forehead out, there you go, good, hold that, let's see that. Okay, here we go, now we can see what we're doing. Okay, there's my real estate. Let's go like this, there's my real estate in that eye. Let me see if I, guys, you got it? You got what I'm talking about, you with me? You with me on this? Nobody's excited? Okay, if that was the island of Manhattan. (laughs) All right, so that's what I like. If those eyes were blue, let's just. Cameron, take a break, Erin just get up here for a second. Let's do Erin's eyes for a second. I think that is so cool. Now, there is a story and people are going to go crazy online about this. There's this story in the 1800's, everybody says people look more attractive when you have dilated pupils for various reasons that are, I haven't gone into details. So there was this drug. What was it, belladonna or something? There was a drug, it goes into, they put it in the eyes to dilate them to be more attractive to others. So people say dilated pupils are more attractive. Not for me, it doesn't do it for me. What does it for me is the color. I think the color, for my work, is more important than how we perceive them as individuals. That's me as an artist, that's my, what I think. That's why I do what I do. You guys can do whatever you want. You can shoot BPS up the wazoo for all I care. That's your work, it's your work. I like my real estate in the eye. Erin, are you in there, get in there. Kodak actually ran an ad in the 70's or 80's promoting big pupils. Kodak ran an ad promoting big pupils. Take the glasses off, come on, don't, I'm doing it for the pupil. (group laughing) This isn't a wardrobe thing, we're not like, I mean, I'll attempt to get a good picture of you. Scoot back a smidge, yeah, make a face like that. Scoot this way a little bit, I can work like this. All right, hold on, hold on, let's see, I'm at one, yeah. I think I'm good, I'm good, let's zoom out. Let's work with Erin, let's see what we got. All right, Erin, you ready, come forward a little. Squint your eyes though, I was teaching you that last night. Hold it right there, let's see what we got. Squinch them, what are you doing? There you go good, let's look, okay. Here we go, it's a little hot isn't it? So that was a skin tone thing, right? She's way lighter than Cameron, let's go, I was at 1/125th of a second. Should we go, you think 1/60th is enough or not, no? You guys got to go 1/200th, let's do it. Hold that, squinch it down, squinch it harder. (camera snaps) There we go, here we go. There we go, okay, real estate in the eye, let's go for it. You volunteered for this. (group laughing) Okay, look at that color, amazing, amazing. All right, let's go for the strobe again. Get the, let's make a move. Going 100, we're going to go 1/160th, F4. We had a 5/6 with him, let's see where I was. I was at five with that one, I was at five, I'm going to go 5/6. It's a 1/160th at five. Yeah, well she's lighter, so let's amp it up. I can go 7/1, all right, get in there. Get close to that light for me, schooch this way. Schooch back, there we go, right there, hold that. Very psyched that Erin made a move. Phil's is lower. I'm not worried about Phil, that's all right. (camera beeps) Okay, right in here, jam the forehead out. Squinch the eye out though, we want it to squinch. Let's see what we got here, let's try it guys. Good, oh my goodness. Did I not get in, can we get in better focus than that? I got my glasses on, I can't see what's going on here. (camera snaps) Good, let's do it again, there we go. Look at that, are you with me or are you with me? Is everybody with me? Let's do this. Are you with me, or are you with me? Look at the real estate, come on, who is a realtor in here? (everyone laughing) Like, you would not go for this if your property lost that much real estate, right? This was like my house after the Sandy storm. (explosions) All right, you guys get it? So, how do we rectify this if we're shooting speed lights? I'm going to give you a trick, here's a trick. Erin, where are you going? (group laughing) I mean, I can bring Cameron back in, but let's do it with you, I like the blue in your eyes. Let's say, now I know I'm gonna teach you a trick. Whenever you set up your lighting in whatever studio you're in, if you have a window, I know I didn't have a window in mine. If you have a window, you will put the window directly behind you, directly behind yourself. So, they may be looking in the camera, but whatever light, and it could be just, it won't be affecting the image at all, because you're gonna be overpowering it. But whatever's behind there is going to create the pupil to go down. Now we got a huge window, is there any way we can just open a little bit of, John, don't do that. Here, hold on just a sec, just go like this, hold on. I just want to open a little bit and see what we can get. So, let's say it's a small window. It's not his huge, enormous window, I want you to go back here and just hold this up like this. Just do this for me, okay? (laughing) We're making moves. Yeah, how's that? Can you get it a little bit higher than that? What are you doing? (group laughing) John, where's John, John, come help him you're 6'5". (laughing) Let me see, look at me? Now I can see the pupil, right, let's see. Hopefully, it's not as big as that. Let's see if John gets in there. I just know a lot of you aren't gonna have a huge window. But you can have, let's see if John gets back there, and if he can, let me look at Erin. Keep looking straight at me, John, get serious. Oh my gosh, we're doing better. Schooch forward a little bit, there you go. Stay right there, hold that. Hold that right there. We're pretty good. We're not gonna get rid of BPS, but we're gonna make it better than what we had. Let's try it. Erin, right here. Hold that, that's pretty good. Schooch a little bit out so I don't get the light in the frame so much, people will complain about that. There you go, hold that right there, let's see. (camera snaps) Good. Okay, okay guys, thank you, you got it, you got it. You got it, you got it. Did I help her? Did I help her? Let's see, okay. Here's BPS, here's window behind. Here's flex kit. Was that helpful? How cool is that? That's a little trick that goes a long way. All right, the last trick that I have for you, is Wescott has these little strips of flex kit material that are about this big. I don't know how much they cost. Can somebody in the chat room go find it and maybe we can talk about that? You can get that today if you wanted to, but it's a little strip and I could put it on my camera and I can dim it so that I can just watch as those pupils get smaller, if you like this look. Which for me, clients come into me. They walk right into my studio and they're like I'm just shooting with you because I like how people's eyes look. I'm like, there you go, I have colorful eyes. My agent told me to come to you. Shabang, that's it. All right, so guys, how cool was that? Erin, thank you. (everyone applauds) I didn't know Erin was gonna get into it. This is awesome. Alright, cool. So we got a bunch of stuff done. Before we do anything else, is I want to go to, go back to my keynote, and we're going to strobe it up. So, we had a couple questions. So, we're going to strobe it up. Yeah, so we can get rid of these and, we can get rid of these, and we can hit some questions before we strobe it up, let's do it. So you guys be thinking, in the studio audience here, if you have questions, be thinking about those. Got a lot of questions about what the power the speed lights were set up when you were shooting with speed lights. Okay, the power of the speed lights. Eighth power Eighth power. Then we adjusted. Hold on, I'm going to take it off here. We had them on A and B channels. And we were at eighth power on A and 32nd of power on B. And B was my buddy Phil at that moment, when we had it with the men's lighting, that was when we did the men's. When we shot with Yuland, we had A and B, and we actually started out with B at 1/16th, and they were at 1/8th. I started with B at 1/32th, we moved it up to 1/8th and it still looked amazing, yeah. And we were at ISO 100, 1/160th of a second at about F 5/6 I think we were at? Yeah. So, that's it. Have you ever used the red eye setting to dilate that preflash? No, I've never have done that. Okay. I never have done that. That's usually if you have an on camera flash. Right. So, if you have an on camera flash, you might have to mess with that, but, I never shoot with a speed light on my camera. I mean, I would, I did shoot in, I did do it once. I was in Times Square, I got hired from Toshiba to shoot Times Square, you know how Toshiba's got the big monitor in Times Square? So, I was running around Times Square, shooting all the people, it was freezing. I had a cold, I was a mess. And, I'm shooting all the people. So, I was like I'm gonna have to have a speed light on camera. I'm running around like a maniac. And back then, we didn't have Wifi or anything going, so I had to run cards to a runner, who went up in the tower where the ball was, all the way to the top to get the images on the screen. So while New Year's was happening, people could see themselves, I'd take the picture and we'd run it up, and they'd see themselves on the big screen and people would freak out, it was a lot of fun. But, it was a horrible, cold night, I had a cold. But that was a moment that I had a speed light on the camera and I did not use the red eye thing. I don't remember having a problem with it. The images came out really good, it was a Canon. I was shooting a 5D Mark II at the time I think, and a Canon speed light on it. I don't remember what year it was. I did a couple years in Times Square doing some stuff with them 'cause one of my clients was the guy who ran the whole thing, it was kind of cool. It was cool, it was cool to be there. I was there with the Clintons when they were pushing the ball down and I got to shoot them. You know the pattern that was in the glasses of the first guy you showed? Can you get that pattern in the eyes? Can I get the pattern in the eyes? Yeah, the dots? I haven't seen that pattern. Yeah, I haven't seen the dot pattern in the eyes. Find it. Do you want the. Yes. You want it? I like it. She likes it, okay, fair enough. You know, what you could do is see this? Take that off, fire those up and then you can do the best you can with it. You're gonna get harsher light out of this. So the reason why I designed this diffusion over it, it's actually double. If you feel it, it's doubly diffused. It knocks it down, I like to beat up my light. I like really soft light. LEDs, the lights come straight out of them. So, you got to hit them hard, so that it bounces around and then it comes out the other end soft. That's why the flex kit is so soft, I love it. But I can take it off and I can make a contrast here, and really harsher.

Understanding how and where light is found when taking a photograph is one of the most essential learnings when taking a portrait. It's easy to spend a lot of time working on complicated lighting set-ups when your best light is often right in front of you. Join well-known portrait photographer Peter Hurley as he simplifies the process by walking you through the fundamentals of lighting. He’ll explain natural light and how to work with what’s available. He’ll discuss how to work with continuous light and the best way to use strobes. Over the course of this class you’ll be able to photograph a portrait using: 

  • Natural Lighting Continuous LIghting 
  • Strobe Lighting 
  • A mixture of variable lighting to create a dynamic portrait with a simple set up

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • I truly enjoyed this amazing lighting class. Peter Hurley shows you how he achieves his signature look using all forms of light shaping tools from natural light, to speelites and high end strobes. Seeing first hand how the placement of the subject to the light source and your lightning set up is so important to avoiding the hazards of flat light and haze. He teaches you his unique methods and secrets on how to make eyes pop and get the best color contrast without harsh shadows. You will leave this class energized to hone your own creative vision with light and shadows using the methods taught by Peter. It was a privilege to learn from a master like Peter Hurley. Thank you Creative Live for another amazing class!
  • This is my first review. I typically don't bother with reviews because I guess if a class is just alright, at least I got something out of it, but this class was just soooo not what I was hoping for, I have to say something. I was disappointed in this, so much so that I've not bothered to complete the series. I found myself speeding up the content to the fullest amount of 2.5X through MOST of the content because Peter talks a lot about nothing that has anything to do with learning lighting. Yay...you were a model at one time Peter...but bragging about it while slapping your modeling photos up there only makes you look insecure. You're still a good looking man and it's just not necessary to see your "once upon a time" modeling shots. I too used to be young and beautiful. Now I'm old and fat. Yay. Do I have anything to offer on what I teach though, that is the question. Your modeling photos & stories did nothing to add to the content of what this class was advertised to be. Your modeling days have nothing to do with what I was hoping to learn from you. Good nuggets of information was thrown out there *at times*, like the idea of corporate headshot sessions working from the shortest woman to the tallest woman and then the shortest man to the tallest man. More content about these kinds of HELPFUL things are what I was looking for. I found the class to be personal story upon personal story upon personal story.......it was not helpful to learning lighting. Suggestion for Peter. EDIT. This was clearly a workshop you hosted. Focus your attention on how you can help lift others up in the skills that have helped you to become confident and successful in your career as a photographer. New photographers to the industry lack confidence and skills and we're looking for mentors. We're desperate for them. We need you to stay on point. Personal stories are ok, but only if they add to what it is you are teaching. Edit your videos down. It tends to tick people off that they paid a lot of money expecting one thing but instead they end up with hours of what is mostly an autobiography. To those looking to learn lighting, there are better, more focused informational learning formats in books from the library for free and experimenting on your own. I would hold off on spending the money on this class until it's re-shot and edited to be a more focused class. Very disappointed and I do not recommend it. Truly disappointed as I respect the work of Peter Hurley. I hate giving him a bad review but I hope he improves on his public speaking/teaching abilities and comes back improved.
  • Peter Hurley is the real deal. Not only does he know and share a ton of really practical knowledge of studio lighting for headshots and fashion, but he cuts through the crap and tells it like it is. He is very encouraging and serious at the same time. He had our attention from Day 1. and never lost it. *Bonus Gold - You've got to check out his Hurely-isms. They are priceless! Aside from the new bag of industry tools to work from, Peter gave me a real, sober perspective on what it takes to be PROFESSIONAL fashion photographer! And CreativeLive provided the perfect setting as well. The whole CL staff were warm and inviting and the food was great! I highly recommend CL and P. Hurley to anyone who wants to learn from the best of the best! I can't wait to start shooting with my new skill set. Sign up for CreativeLive! Take advantage of all that they have to offer! Build a foundation, own your light, and Shebang!!! You'll be at the top of your game in no time!