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Sketch like an Industrial Designer

Lesson 10 of 16

Chrome and Reflective Materials

 

Sketch like an Industrial Designer

Lesson 10 of 16

Chrome and Reflective Materials

 

Lesson Info

Chrome and Reflective Materials

all right. In this next phase, we're going to be working with Chrome's and highly reflective materials. And this is when we have to start having some fun. All right, So what I did once I got my drawings more less defined. Something that I really liked right out of these three drawings. I thought I could combine Onley to on this page. So I took them. I blew them slightly larger. It's slightly larger. Uh, these one is exactly the same size, no, same size. So I put them under and then just trace them, making a good composition. Good composition means you do whatever you want, as long as it kind of fits well in the page. You don't need to follow a lot of rules. Mainly, you would just have to make sure that you have at least half inch border all around. And if you can, you dio that can waited. Border. You know the words to make your margin bigger on the bottom, so it looks better that way. Um, and then very gently, I traced my lines. Instead of using a black pencil, I used brown pencil. All...

right. The main thing would be here. Let's see, um, when you draw a vehicle, you use again your your templates, especially. You can see over here these wheel. I was having not travel, but I really wanted to make sure Since this is the real that is closest to us, that holds more detail. I really wanted to make sure that I drew it well, So you just have to go through your different, um, templates. Find a correct one. Not this one. It's that one, but actually bigger. And then you would just trace your outline. It's got to be this one here for the next face up the next one up. So we just get put it on top and you trace the outline. All right? And then you I traced the inside and inside and the inside. It's a bunch of concentric circles. Ellipses one inside another. All right, so that's how I got this, uh, this one going on. So I got these two over here. And what is this stuff? Right. So let's get to that. Let me step. Trace my steps back a little bit, and now let's talk about using pastels. All right? This is when we work with chrome's. We have Teoh work with two different types of reflections or two different types of tones. Um, very loosely. Let's see if I had it say, a shape that would be like this. You're so much like an abstraction off a car. No wheels, but roughly a car, right? So would we usually have issue can divide it in half. From here up, it would be picking up the sky, the sky tones, and from this line down, it would pick up ground lines where they would be the earth, the kind of a brownish tone. Or if it is standing on grass, he would be more like green. Most of the times you see renderings more in brown. But what if this actually this object this actually painted in green? How do we translate the sky tone on the earth tone with green? Like what? That's complicated. I don't know. What you do is always keep in mind for chrome's or highly polished surfaces. What you do is from this middle up, you work with very light, which is this color very light tones on your dark trump. You work from the bottom down with darker tones because the top tones would pick up the sky tones, which are usually lighter. The bottom half would be picking up earth tones, which are usually darker, whether it would be sitting on asphalt or dirt. So instead of using with the green, I mean blue and brown tones what you do. It's variations off the green tone. Very light green tones for the top, mostly using pencils or pastels. Now get to that, and the bottom would be use mostly with markers. And this is what I have over here. You see, the top part has been done with pastels. You see a lot of pastel over here, and then I'm working with markers on the bottom half. You see if I want to make it very reflective. I do insist more on my darker brown tones on the bottom. If I have a parting line or, in other words, I have a separation between these two parts. This is a rear part three. This where the motor is so it needs to be lifted so that you can service the motor so this top heart has to be left her or removed so you can access it so I need to have a parting line or a break over here. That's when I That's why I added a highlight over here. Okay, but we're going a bit ahead. So let's stop that for a second and let's go back here. So we got the idea of the two colors. So what I did over here to get this very soft pastel tones is the following. I got first a caller that I liked in this case yellow, and then I scratched it with chest a regular knife. You can use a kitchen knife if you don't have a second I for any other brand rice is just get some color down, and then, if you think it's too bride, you can also makes colors if you want. If you want to make it a bit more orange for red, we have two colors there and then the best you can. I know this is kind of passive texture to it. You kind of blend them in and you get this is a makeup had, um um just pure cotton. Right. So you just grabbed these two collars. You blend them in and you have, you know, all the powder over here, and then you just apply your strokes over here. All right? So that's how I did this background color right over the entire thing. Once this is done, um, you might want to, um, get your hands cleaned up. If you cannot clean your hands, the next best thing would be to have a piece of white paper know if your hands were starting to get dirty. You get a piece of white paper to protect your drawing as much as you can and you work away from your paper. What you see here, this is the needing. A racer. It's an eraser that is some sort of a looks like plastic, lean or plasticine. You need to kind of needed. Hence the name right. You need to soften. Ate it, gets warmer to the touch is your Soften it until you get a cleaner surface. You see, it gets lighter. Have used these one a lot, by the way, they go bad after a while, so you would have to If they get very soft, they start to use some some oils. Throw them away. It's better there cheap. Get a new one to get going So, um, you know when to stop using them when they they just feel too soft, and then you just work. You erase your first the working with the outline to, so I want to erase the outline. All right, When you work with pastels, you saw me do this. You can do that with a hand, but just very carefully. If you want to spend more on supplies, you can get a brush like this, or just a regular painter's brush that is brand new. You cleaning like that? Why do I say that our hand has some skin, some some oil, natural oil, and if you rabbit a lot on the paper, the actual oil will actually get absorbed by the paper. And if you were color with pastels, that spot will have a wonderful dark spot, and you don't want that so as much as possible. You want to protect your paper and then clean up with a little brush again. Any brush will work, but this is kind of fancier brought so you can really get going faster, and then you just work, erasing the areas that you want. So we said, and that's how I get from here. What? Least here. You see how this is hold? Trimmed. Right. So that's my first step. The second step would be to creating a final sketch using, um, then on for a blow for Let's get some. Let's talk a bit more about problems. These are more examples of how we can achieve Chrome's. I know this is kind of outrageous, but you're a designer, and you can sometimes explore different options. What if yours catch was actually a street sweeper in pink and you have it in town? Uh, sure enough, you would make the news, and then maybe, you know, you would get even a more interesting audience or people coming into your neighborhood. Why not? So we have red and pink. So whenever you work again with creating a very reflective object, you work with two colors, one slightly darker, one slightly darker. This case we have yellow and brown. We have the pinkish stone and red, or we have here in Moore, Matt Brown, lighter browning, even darker browns. We have two sets, two pairs of colors, three different choices, and you work Always you saying used thesis a pointer. There is hash the hash to be a brake line. From that line down, it would be reflecting the ground tones. From that line up, it would be reflecting the sky. Sway would be lighter.

Class Description

Product renderings help prove concepts, provide insights, and sell ideas. In Sketch like an Industrial Designer, Jorge Paricio will teach you the art and science of drawing products by-hand.

Despite the proliferation of rendering software, there is still a place in the market for freehand designs. In this class, Jorge will teach you techniques for drawing products for professional use. 


You’ll learn how to: 

  • Render objects from multiple perspectives
  • Simulate reflections and materials
  • Sketch with different tools
  • Create orthographic views
Jorge will demonstrate the process for using a variety of common drafting tools and discuss the importance of your early doodles and sketches for developing a polished final product.

In Sketch like an Industrial Designer, you’ll learn how to create professional, comprehensive product visualizations that you’ll be proud to deliver to clients.

Reviews

Mike
 

I thought this was a well rounded introduction to this subject. Really liked the teachers attitude as well - very inspiring!