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Sketch like an Industrial Designer

Lesson 15 of 16

Defining Final Outlines and Contrast

 

Sketch like an Industrial Designer

Lesson 15 of 16

Defining Final Outlines and Contrast

 

Lesson Info

Defining Final Outlines and Contrast

you see these gray rendering? It looks unfinished. Let's make it finished in just a jiffy with just a couple of strokes. So we would work first with an intermediate line Wait to define my outlines. Okay. Remember, if you're not sure off your curves you can always use your french curves to clean your lines a bit more. All right, so you see, once they add this outlines, the design really comes up Quite nice. We don't have to do a lot, so I have the back. Almost there I was using blue. This was the darker blue list. Here's the lighter blue. Test them on the side always just to make sure, um, add blue over here for my windows. What's happening over here? There is some sort of an overlap off inside and outside. So you are the master over here, you can really be inventive and see how much of a ghosted view you want to show inside and outside their blending. We can really figure that out later, but I am getting an indication that a little bland would be a great thing to do. All right, I'm add...

ing also just to gain some more contrasts and blue tones over here just to make the bottom part of my chrome a little more contrast. E and I still need to work with my very thin black lines. So that's something that I want to save for last just to make sure these are now my thin lines. All right, this thin line here has a very clear intention because this has to be lifted or removed so that I can service my engine. So instead of drawing very thin lines almost invisible, I really made sure that I showed that line. You see these lines that I did for the outer structure, how they are very loose and sketchy. You can always clean them up a bit more with better outlines, connects to find more this side like that. Okay, let's use a different gray C three. I like Steve Green. Our C five would be better. Something like that. More contrast here and you see Santa leads really coming to life. Whatever I do here needs to be repeated here because it is the same design after also, if we want to be more inventive here, we need to make sure that it transferred to this side. It's ad. You see how I had thes brake light and dark, light and dark with that line there doesn't do something here, too might. And dark, light and dark. Um, just a little curve over there for dark. Then this bottom could be darker, darker like that. All right, so we are on our way to really render this. This vehicle has some very interesting and difficult mechanical elements here. Um, so this cabin, this front element has to be pulled out so that it can empty. So in other words, they has to be a void space here, full off equipment and gears and what not? I'm sure there's better to terms to the final those elements, but let's just call it stuff. So we can always market dark if we want, so that we're making a very clear notion here that there is a space in between the front hood and decide full off elements there. Well, the mechanical parts and then we design here we focus on what is important, which is just the, you know, the decide on the front. Are you guys doing with your outside shapes coming along? I'm going back to the inside. You see, I decided not to render the steering wheel so that I would have a better sense of the, um, console. I can always do that as a ghosted view on top. All right, so I'm cleaning out my shapes here. These are the last touches to clean up my drawing. All right, so we need to make sure that we have, um, the right elements over here, Like the buttons. Let's bring some definition to them. These are ellipsis. If you're not too sure you want to do them by hand again, you would use your lips templates. And if this would not work, you can get this one, for example, has all kinds of different angles from 15 degrees to 30. 45 in 60. You would just have to pick the correct one and then laid over and clean up, for example, they spent so you can really get very precise with that. And when you get very good, you can do competitions with your peers on who does the best ellipses or circles. All right, um, so I can do my dial's over here. I can retrace them so that I can get better details with them. And this is just a matter off kind of defining this sketch little by little in this case, using very thin lines to define the most small details. They are important, but they still need to be designed. Do I want to square? Do I want to circle? This is squared this a circle, uh, decide. All right, let's go for square over here. You see, once we had outlines, the imperfections really disappear. So it's not a big deal. The main thing is to keep it symmetrical, one side on the other. Otherwise the design wouldn't really be us us strong.

Class Description

Product renderings help prove concepts, provide insights, and sell ideas. In Sketch like an Industrial Designer, Jorge Paricio will teach you the art and science of drawing products by-hand.

Despite the proliferation of rendering software, there is still a place in the market for freehand designs. In this class, Jorge will teach you techniques for drawing products for professional use. 


You’ll learn how to: 

  • Render objects from multiple perspectives
  • Simulate reflections and materials
  • Sketch with different tools
  • Create orthographic views
Jorge will demonstrate the process for using a variety of common drafting tools and discuss the importance of your early doodles and sketches for developing a polished final product.

In Sketch like an Industrial Designer, you’ll learn how to create professional, comprehensive product visualizations that you’ll be proud to deliver to clients.

Reviews

Mike
 

I thought this was a well rounded introduction to this subject. Really liked the teachers attitude as well - very inspiring!