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The Adventure Workshop

Lesson 15 of 36

Editing Part 2

 

The Adventure Workshop

Lesson 15 of 36

Editing Part 2

 

Lesson Info

Editing Part 2

(gentle music) (shutter clicks) We're on Photoshop now, and this is where the fun part two begins. That's where I usually crop four by five for social. I use my keyboard to move it. Seeing how centered this photo is, I wanna make sure it's real centered. I'd either eyeball it or I can draw a ruler through the image. Just drag from here if you wanna move your ruler. I need to exit this cropping tool. To move your ruler, you're gonna be in this tool here. I use V to get it. Okay, V. You can move your ruler to where you want it. But yeah, we're pretty centered with this. Let's say you wanna be even more precise, you can zoom in and now we're bang on with the kayak at least, but not Rod. All right. Make sure it's centered then I go to my cropping tool. We're aligned. Good. Now I love this part, 'cause that's where I get to make a difference. I can see in this line here that the horizon isn't completely straight. Nothing too crazy, but give it a little adjustment. Looks better now. All ri...

ght. So the thirds. I like to have this horizon in this third here. And oh, we're off-center now. All right, we're back to center. Oh no, my ruler isn't moving. Okay, so I have the horizon on my top third here. This horizon, I'm gonna call this the shore out there. That's the horizon for me. Hit enter. It's there. So we see this white band caused by straightening the image. We can fix that later. For now, make sure we're centered again. All right. The furthest away shore is on my top third. The kayak is on my lower third, which I like a lot. I'm still having some nice room. I'm leaving some room for the mountains to breathe. There's some tree here that's a bit strange, but we'll take care of that after. I'm also getting enough room for the light here to live. So I feel pretty good about this crop. Mm, I feel like there could be a bit more breathing room over the mountains when I'm looking at it now, so let's go back here and use my keyboard. So we lose the third on the shore, but we bring Rod to the middle of the lower third, which is good. Let's see now if there's more breathing room. Yep, I like it better. Mm, a little lower again. It's something you feel, really. I like to have it in white. Now I feel it. So how do you explain that? Well, I just like that this tree's hitting this third here, and that our kayak is in the lower third. Feels balanced, harmonious. Okay, so let's do some cleanups. When I do that, I wanna duplicate this layer here. When I do any modification to the image, I wanna duplicate this layer. So I hit command + J. Layer zero copy is here. Now I can do mods and if something goes wrong, I can always delete this layer and still have my image back up. Command + Z, bring it back. Light. All right. So this is the light in the distance from the lodge. I'm gonna get rid of it. I don't think it adds to the story. So I use my stamp tool, hit S for my stamp tool. So opacity is a hundred now, full 100. Right click on the image to see the size of it. Looks like a good size. My hardness I keep pretty low usually, between zero and five. Unless I'm doing a pretty advanced cleanup job, I'm gonna keep this pretty soft and decent-sized. But if I'm doing an advanced finishing job, I might just bring it to a small size, zoom in a lot, and bring the hardness to like so I can recreate the edges of things. You need hard edges for mountains, for example. You can't just be soft edges. All right, but here for now, we're doing easy stuff. All right. Zoom in there. Get in there real close. I see that the size may be a little too big now. All right, now I hit alt on the keyboard, and I'm gonna select where I'm cloning from. So I have this whole line to choose from. This is a little dark here. It's a little brighter here, so I'm gonna use somewhere with light. Right here. And just need to align. All right. I can see the red edge here. I shouldn't be touching it too much, so it's good to go. Now, I'm gonna move on to this part here and clone from here. All right, so if you zoom out, you don't see anything. It's never existed. There's still more things I can clean up. Like this, I don't really like, so keep going. I'm zooming out there. Just select anywhere here. And it's a little brighter because it gets darker throughout the corner because of vignette of the lens, a natural vignette. It's fine. Don't worry too much about it for now. To remove it, then I'm gonna use my patch tool here, up here. And I can just do it very broad. Never happened, yeah? So for some applications, it works better. All right. There's a star here. There's the moon actually, here. What is it? This thing here. I'm not sure I like it or not. It's a bit distracting, but I guess it adds to the scene. I'm always wondering does this add to the story and the scene, yes or no? And in this case, even though distracting, I think it adds something, so I'm gonna leave it. It adds this surreal feel. I'll keep it. So now the snow is pretty dirty. It's this melt. Not super fun to work with. I like this part here. It gives a good, strong line to the top part of the image. But this one is not great. It would be a super long job to clean this up. But this one here, that's been distracting me. The corner of the image I want to take care of. Go back to my S. And we'll select from here, very broad. Exciting trees, keeping it the same. My goal is to remove the information, the visible noise. The snow makes noise and I wanna remove that, because I want people to focus on this and the surreal light on the mountains. All right. Now this little thingy is here. I don't want it either. Okay. See our before and after quickly? Not too much, but we see already that this does a big difference. It doesn't bring your eye to that right part of the image. It kinda keeps you centered here, focused. So at this point, I don't think there's many things I wanna clean up. This branch, I like. It kinda edges the image back the other way, kinda bounces back. This line bounces this direction. This one brings you back up here. I like it. There's this rock back here that's debatable. I probably wanna get rid of it. Yeah, I like that better. Okay, earlier I mentioned that I liked the paddle strokes on the first image I was looking at. So let's try to bring these paddle strokes in here. While I'm seeing this here, get rid of it. All right. Any little hole I'm gonna patch. And we can go a little more deep in here. You can spend an unlimited amount of time cutting an image. It's just how patient are you, and how much do you love it, you know? But you could spend the whole day and still not be finished. So it's important to be able to know when to stop, and for me it's pretty quickly because I wanna go out and shoot. Okay. Back to Lightroom. So this is the paddle stroke I liked here, okay? So instead of redoing the whole edit on this image, I'm just gonna go and copy from this one, copy everything, because they're the same thing essentially. Copy, all right. Paste it here. All right, good. Bring this one into Photoshop. All right. So we can use this as our source. This one's our source. 32 and 31 is our destination image. So I usually just go ahead and hit command + A, command + C, and just paste it right here in this other, command + V. Okay, so we see what's going on. We see these paddle strokes look cooler on the top image, on 32. So I wanna bring 'em up to 31. So I wanna try to align the images, so I'm gonna go opacity 50%. And I can align this better. They're not in the same exact spot on the river because he was moving. It's real life, but we can get close just with the nose of the kayak, at least. Zoom in, get a little closer. The goal, really, I don't really care about the silhouette. I wanna make sure that I can align the strokes around the paddle. I'm seeing that 32 is a little bigger as an image. I'm gonna go ahead and make it a tad smaller, command + T. Getting smaller. 'Cause if I align the headlamps, I can see that not matching super well. All right, headlamps are aligned now. Very close in terms of size. All right. All right, this looks pretty good. I hit enter. Now I have my man with many arms paddling. Let's name our layers. We'll call this 32. This one 31. It's just the last numbers of the final name. That's how I go. So 32, we'll put it underneath 31. That's 31 copy. It's 31 copy. All right. So now this is our image, the one we've been working on so far. And I'm gonna bring these, the paddle strokes on 32, on this one. So I'm gonna go ahead and merge these two. Make a mask. Make a vector mask and use my brush. To bring your brush, hit B. Let's say you've been playing with colors the day before. And your brush, you know, is red. So let's say you wanna bring your default colors back. You hit D. All right, that's what you need for masking. And if you wanna change between both of them, hit X. So D for default, X for X, cool. (chuckles) All right, now I'm gonna choose my hardness. Pretty soft again. A decent size. I'm gonna be painting on these brushes here, these strokes. So I take black, my brush, and that's how we paint over this image. This is kind like erasing things from this image, but it's not really. Let's say I made a mistake. I can revert my colors by clicking here or hitting x, and I can bring back my mistake. It's like a magic eraser. All right. So now, let's go for the paddle strokes. Bring my opacity a bit down so I see what's happening with both images. Just paint for now. Let's just see what happens. All right, let's see what we're doing now. All right, so we're brought them for sure. We can obviously see what just happened, because this photo's a bit darker. I can disable my mask, see where we were. All right, so no big deal. This is okay. All right, so I'm working with two images with different exposures. All right, so what we do here, we continue painting a bit more. All right, and now I'm going back to delete. I'm going back to white, and I'm gonna pick a bigger size brush. I'm gonna paint around this just to fade it. A little bigger. And I can make it a little more subtle around the edges. And I don't even have to touch where I'm going exactly. This is fine what's happening here. We can fix it after. Just being subtle around it. So it looks a little more believable. I can fix the paddle thing. Now we can fix the front of the kayak again. Get this. All right, I see what's going on now. Do we see what's happening around our image? I think we have to fix, see here, what's happening with this here. Peculiar. Okay. So that's one of the ways. Huh. All right. So looks pretty good now. Few things we wanna fix. (laughs) Looks like a penis. So we're gonna place our stroke shadow at the right place. So this side doesn't have a stroke shadow obviously, because it's in the water now. But this one has. I can get further away from the image, see how things are. And it's easy to miss stuff when you're at this stage, so I like to do this a lot, bring them like this fast. Can see something's happening here. All right. So let's say I feel pretty good about it. Go ahead and save it as a TIFF file so I can have access to my layers. And I'll make a new folder inside my image folder called TIFF. That's where I keep my TIFFs usually. Yep. So no compression. I wanna keep my layers in. Good, all right. Also, if I hit command + save, it's gonna bring me back to Lightroom as well. So command + save saves the image for Lightroom too. It's a pretty heavy file. It's gonna take a while, but now we should see the image in Lightroom being created. There it is. So we can compare with the two. 31. So here's our two images. I almost like these paddle strokes now better, you know? That happens sometimes. You spend half an hour doing something and then like actually, these paddle strokes look better. That's fine because I still have my photo in Photoshop saved. I can just disable my layer mask, delete 32, and I can also save this as another version, update the file in Photoshop and Lightroom. This will update the file in Lightroom. And again, I can always go back if I don't like it. There you go. I like it better with these paddle strokes, 'cause I get to have this shoulder here. I can always have this option still ready if I wanna decide. But at this point, I think I like this one better. All right, now let's save this as my final one I'm happy with. I'm gonna go ahead and bring it back to Photoshop again for saving. This is if you've redone adjustments over your TIFF. I haven't, so I'm gonna go with original, which is already in Photoshop. So this is my original. I can close it. I don't have to save, because I've already saved it. So now I like this image. I'm ready to export it. Right click, bring it back into Photoshop, put some curves. This is if you've done some further edits in Lightroom, which I haven't. If you have, you hit here and you have all the adjustments made to the TIFF go back into Photoshop, but I haven't, so edit. There it is. Okay. I give it some curves here quickly before finishing, and auto usually is a very good place to start for me. And I can play with the opacity here, see what happened. What auto does is that it tries to bring as much color and information to the photo. I'll show you what it does inside the curves. I've hit auto. It's done some adjustments that are not super subtle. They're quite extreme, but we see what it's trying to do. It's trying to bring as much information and light to the image. So with curves, I like to use this tool here. I hit alt on my keyboard and I slide it until I can start seeing. This shows you the underexposed things here. In your curve, this is something dark. This is all the shadows, midtones, and highlights here. So this function lets me know how far I can go into my blacks before losing all the information right here. Let me check it for this part. Just wanna show you the tool. Same happens with highlights, it's just telling you how far can you go before you burn it. All right. So I usually have curves hit auto. If I like it, I'll just mess with the opacity. And I usually just do some final tweakings here. And you can totally do this in Lightroom. I just prefer doing them in here. The shadows are a little too, I'm thinking for posting here. All right. So we've done our curves, final tweaks. So I feel good about the image overall. I've done my curves just a little bit. Bring back some brightness. I'm ready to save the image for usage. So what I like to do is resize before I do that. So I go into image size or command + alt + I is quicker. I always wanna have my widest part of the image 4,000. So if it's in portrait format, 4,000 for my longest side, and 1,300 for my width. And if it's a landscape, I'll do the opposite, 4,000 for my width. And it will make the height 3,200. So it's a portrait, a thousand. I keep this at 240 dpi. That's the way the camera should sit. Hit okay. I save at this size because it just takes less space, uploads faster, and also renders well on social or on the phone. It's kinda my sweet spot. Now I'm ready to save, so file, save as, or command + shift + S. I go into my Dropbox folder. This is the Dropbox folder I've added to my Finder. And I put this into JPEG. I keep the filename usually, so I can find it easier after. I don't give it a name. It would also be too time-consuming. I'm gonna keep the Adobe RGB embedded. The phone will turn it into sRGB anyways, but at least I have it as Adobe for the laptop. Save. I'm always gonna save as 12, maximum quality, except it's for a website, like a banner. Otherwise 12 all the time. Okay, now it's uploading to Dropbox right now. And there it is. So it's in the folder. This is where I'll put all my JPEGS since 2014. They're all here. It might seem overwhelming, but I can find them all thanks to search because I have keyworded everything, and also I can see them chronologically. I can see July every month. So that's the way I go through my images. I go by year and month in my head. If I wanna go by places, I can use my Finder library, into the RAID. That's just places. So now the image is here. I always wanna have them in Dropbox, because it's another safety layer. My JPEGS are in the cloud in a different place. That's good. I can access it from my laptop from on the road on the cloud. So I love having access to all my images since years ago just on the cloud through Dropbox. And then I can go grab it from my phone pretty easily with the Dropbox app, and done.

Class Description

Alex Strohl brings his Adventure Photography Workshop to CreativeLive to explain his approach to photography, editing and the sometimes overwhelming but super important business side of things. In this workshop- Alex takes you on a journey through his shooting process, developing your own style, editing your images and then strategies to get yourself noticed and grow your career.

You’ll learn:

  • Basics of camera techniques and making memorable images
  • Developing your own workflow and style
  • Getting noticed and working with brands
  • Taking action to accelerate your career

Reviews

David Corrochano
 

There's a lot of useful information on how to start up your bussiness or your carreer as a photographer. Great advices, he shows his personal workflow, from the beggining of a shooting till the end. That was what I was looking for. The editing process maybe could be reduced in only one chapter. Worth it.