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The Adventure Workshop

Lesson 13 of 36

Transferring Files & Making Selects

 

The Adventure Workshop

Lesson 13 of 36

Transferring Files & Making Selects

 

Lesson Info

Transferring Files & Making Selects

(soft music) So, here I'm gonna talk about how I organize my folders, my Lightroom Catalogs. How we move my files around between cards and computer. How we do it from the office Chris Comfortable. How we do it from the road. How to use key words in Lightroom. And the way I use previews. So, let's do it. I like to have everything closed, just two nice little windows open. On the left side I have my memory card. On the right side I have my drive where I put my things in. So, this is the way I organize my folders, per year. 2017, we have Adventures. So, for me it's nothing commercial, it's just having fun going around. There's a commercial work here. There's a folder for films. And the same thing is for every year. Adventures, adventures commercial. So, this is how I keep my folders organized. So yesterday, we're having fun. We're just shooting in Montana. I have a folder for each place I go, and what season I went. For Alberdi I went in the fall, then I went in the spring. So, right no...

w we're still in the fall, we're in Montana. That's why I have a red dot next to it, 'cause it's my current catalog. So, once I move on to the winter, the winter will be red. I'll just grab my files from here. And find what I wanna copy. This is where we shot yesterday, so I'll just usually copy. Command C and then command V paste to the folder I want to get it. I like to keep it on the memory card always just in case the RAID explodes or something I still have my files on my memory card. Once the transfer's complete, I'll go ahead and open Lightroom. I don't wanna open it now, because it's gonna slow down the RAID. It's gonna try to load a bunch of images. Right now I'm just trying to transfer this fast as I can. (soft music) I used to have all my files in one catalog until 2015. My catalog gets so big that it was super slow, even though I try to reveal thumbnails, I tried all the tricks online, nothing really cut it. It was just to slow, so. It was a painful move, but I decided to have every catalog in every fold for the images, and I'm gonna show you what that looks like. So, here on the RAID, I'll have 2017, we'll go to commercial, we'll go to some work for Cannon this year. So let's say, shall the ADD in 2017. Just for this small shoot I have a catalog that's here inside the folder and there's a catalog, and go ahead and open it. And that's the same thing for every place that we go shoot. Let's say shot in Switzerland this summer, there's the region and the year. And, here at the end to always have my catalog with my images from Switzerland only. It's more organized and every catalog works way smoother and faster for me. Totally recommend it. So, let's say that I just came back from a trip in Greenland and this is the year 2018 and it was the spring. Go ahead, before I start importing anything, I'm gonna go into my RAID. Let's say the year 2018 already exist. Let's say this was a personal project, under adventures always. And, I'm gonna go ahead and create Greenland spring 2018. Okay, then before I throw my files in there, I'm gonna go into Lightroom, and before I put my files in it I'm just gonna make a new catalog. So, I'll go file. New catalog. 2018, adventures, put it in spring. And I'm gonna call it the same way as the folder. Now you see Lightroom just made a folder for this catalog, and it's right here, this is the catalog, that .LRcat. Also handy, if you look for catalogs you just type LRcat and all the catalog here. Another way I like to find my catalogs, let's say I went to France in 2017, and I wanna find my catalog quickly. Type France 2017 and .LRcat. Boom, there it is, pure and easy. I just have to double click. It's gonna open the window with all my photos from that trip only, that's all there is. Just one summer in France. There's the folder appearance. That's it. (soft music) So, let's say I'm looking for images of Montana, where I was kayaking for example. Today, somebody want's these images, so I wanna find them for a reason. I wanna do prints. Instead of going back through all the catalogs that I've had here since 2015, I'm just gonna use the finder. And I'm gonna go into my Dropbox folder where I save all my JPEG's. Don't worry I'll dive into this when we talk about editing, but for now I'll just show you how to find them. So, I'll just go and type Montana, kayak, select my folder. And then, it's showing me stuff from years ago. So, I can just hit show all. So, this is how I find images from last year, from two years ago, really quickly. That comes down to you doing those keywords when you're in Lightroom or Adobe Bridge or Photo Mechanic. So, I love keywords. Also they go into 500PX automatically if you do that on your computer. (soft music) So, now that I've imported my images with all my keywords and built my previews, it's time do selects, so let's do it. To Lightroom, a like to go full screen. So, I usually hit here or hit command, shift, F. If you wanna bring the side tabs, you hit tab, they're here. And, now if I wanna go into develop module I just hit D. And I start looking. So, if you wanna go back to thumbnails, we hit G or here brings you back. For selects, we got not many to go through, but I usually like to go and start from the end, 'cause that's where the best stuff is usually for me. 'cause I've spent the day, the afternoon, playing around. And by the end, I got the most solid angles. So, these are the HDR we shot yesterday that we're gonna layer after. I shot one for the sky, one for exposing the tents in the fire, one a little better for that. One for the full ground. And then, we can just layer them all together. This is a bunch of different framings we tried. This is when we're in the lake. I don't need to do selects for the SGR's, because I know where they are. But, if you go to more individual shots like when we're shooting Blue Arrow with Rod, I can start getting into it. Usually, I just like to do a quick pass, just to get an idea of what I'm working with. If I see something that's like, boom, I'll just hit four to give it a four star rating. I either use zero or four stars. If it's a commercial shoot I might use three and four but that's it really, there's no five stars. So, I'll just do quick pass for the day. I'm not super patient when it come to selects because I'd rather be shooting. But, I'll just do my best to look at everything. (soft music) I know what I'm working with, I know that the light when we began shooting is not ideal. So, I'm gonna go ahead, and start from the end again. Just back to the Blue Arrow. So, with Blue Arrow it's okay to have shots that are blurry like this one, it's just part of the exercise. I just don't deal with them, I let them stay there. It's super close to sharp. Again, on sharpness, I don't really pay to much attention about being on focus, I just prefer to have the mood of the photo talk. So, we won't get bugged down at this point, if it's sharp or not sharp. This one is clearly super sharp, go ahead and hit it. Make it a four. These one I like too 'cause the water's moving. So, this view point is always calm here. So, I'm glad I knew about it, so we could run here and get the photos. I just love this time of the day, because everything's on the same light intensity, the sky, the water, everything's just soft, and I'm craving these blues all the time. And, I can just see the headlight of Rod's light. It's just enough to give me the context. This one, I like it because it's a line between the trees and the fire. Let's give it a four. I'm pretty generous with my fours. Just give it a couple and then I can revisit after. I usually like to have some music playing too, just to make it easier, nicer. I usually just throw whatever's on my discover weekly on my playlist on Spotify. This one I like. And this one wasn't staged, just Rod was just looking out. Bam. We can see how the conditions weren't that great. It never got still. But, by running at the end of the bridge we're able to get some photos that are usable. We can see again that just a little pop of color in Rods jacket, just holds everything together. This one we might be able to work with just because the light in the mountains is great. This one too we'll just have to touch out the little yellow floating thing. Then we're back to the beginning with the light. Wasn't just there yet. So far I get really excited about the photos of Rod under the bridge and the photos of the campfire at the end. Now, I've done my select. So, it's time to grab a little coffee. (soft upbeat music) Let's get into the editing.

Class Description

Alex Strohl brings his Adventure Photography Workshop to CreativeLive to explain his approach to photography, editing and the sometimes overwhelming but super important business side of things. In this workshop- Alex takes you on a journey through his shooting process, developing your own style, editing your images and then strategies to get yourself noticed and grow your career.

You’ll learn:

  • Basics of camera techniques and making memorable images
  • Developing your own workflow and style
  • Getting noticed and working with brands
  • Taking action to accelerate your career

Reviews

David Corrochano
 

There's a lot of useful information on how to start up your bussiness or your carreer as a photographer. Great advices, he shows his personal workflow, from the beggining of a shooting till the end. That was what I was looking for. The editing process maybe could be reduced in only one chapter. Worth it.