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Typographic Illustration - Personalizing Letters and Logos

Lesson 1 from: Personalizing Letters & Logos

Jack Davis

Typographic Illustration - Personalizing Letters and Logos

Lesson 1 from: Personalizing Letters & Logos

Jack Davis

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Lesson Info

1. Typographic Illustration - Personalizing Letters and Logos

Lesson Info

Typographic Illustration - Personalizing Letters and Logos

the nice thing that I love about working with type, especially when you get into illustrative type, which is what we're talking about now. How to take type a little bit further is, um, that has layer styles at its disposal and layer styles are just such a powerhouse tool kit, an Erector set of bitchin graphic design things that it's hard to not get excited about it. And the fact that that could be done for type as well as any logo or any kind of graphic is excellent. So we started off. We were just dealing with some of the type capabilities here. We set some type. This type is just some good old fashion. Actually, it's a CC Dutch courage. I don't know if the brothers is that the that sponsor. I wish I would have known I would have happy to give them a plug. Anybody who does type for a living is my best friend, but in terms of this right here is just cc type courage, really nice or deco font. And we said it and then what we're seeing here is a layer style being applied to it. We're gonn...

a get into that today, but you can see even the kind of airbrush spattered interior of the type the fill, the glow, the stroke. All of that is just being done with a layer style, but and it's still live type. So what we did then is we went in here and we talked about the fact that you can take individual letter forms and change them in terms of either stuff like they're your Kern ing. So now we're gonna do a really trendy our logo is are what we're charging for. Our logo is going up exponentially as we, um, current tighter in this thing here and C can we get away with? That's still gonna be a tough one. I don't know who chose that one. There's no way it has to be parallel. You can't have the cemetery, But why not have instead of type, it's gonna be It's gonna be pipe are hype. That's what it meant. And that's what I meant to be the logo. The company is hype, and so we'll go here and do hype. And then now we've got Now, finally, how is just bugging me now? Oftentimes you cannot do that. You can't change the name of the company just because you don't like how the letter forms continue. But were we meant to do that? And this is all just to say that you have a lot of flexibility with type. In this case, obviously, the center front we were using the keyboard shortcuts of option on the Mac Ault on the PC between any two letter forms and they left and right Arrow is what we're doing to hand current the type. You can also select a piece of type and then come up here and go into your character palate. And then you can go up or down to scale pieces of type, and then what we did Now just do it from scratch on this one Here is I'll duplicate that layer before you convert something into outlines. It's always great to convert it just because you know that you probably misspelled it or something else is gonna happen. So that keyboard shortcut of Commander Control J as that one there, your standard shortcuts and photo shopped for duplicate current layer is something to memorize. I'm gonna now, right, click on this live type over here and I'm gonna come over here and say convert to shape and that conferred to shape. It used to be called convert toe outlines, but now it's called Convert to Shape and then come down here to remember in the lower left hand corner of the toolbar in photo shop everything that starts with the pen tool. These four areas are all vector based shapes, all vector based tools. The pen for drawing from scratch. Whether that's using the pen tool in your traditional busy Azour freehand, drawing it your type tool in different ways of setting. Type your selection tools okay both for a path or individual portions of a path, which is what the direct selection does or your custom shape tool. And again, most people don't know that there's a whole library of vector shapes waiting at your disposal in photo shop, but by right clicking on and say convert to shape. That means that I have access to individual elements of the type, and we make sure that I'm the right tool. The direct select Like I said, that's a portion of it. So now I can come up here and drag it or, you know, move it wherever I want. So, um, that is going to allow you to shape your letter forms in any way that you would like. Also, if you'd like, just as a reminder, if you come up here, you have, um, the ability to say how you're going to combine shape. So I've got multiple shapes here that are overlapping each other. If I want them to come up here and subtract from one another or do the intersection of these or exclude the inner overlapping shapes, you can do so just like an illustrator. So I'm selecting. I'm not selecting the E over here. I'm just selecting these two fonts here, and that's going to determine how they interact with each other. This is up here in the options bar for the direct select tool for any of these shaped tools. Let me zoom up here and again. That's gonna be this icon right here. Path operations you can combine, subtract. This is actually combines the vector shape. So if you were actually, if this was the logo I'm going to retire on, I want those three shapes actual. Let's take all those four shapes and come up here and combine those shapes. I can actually do a a merge shaped components, and now you'll notice that they are now one set logo, just like you would want to do. As I mentioned earlier, you would never want a logo to go out into the world in any way that's flexible, where the client's gonna be tempted to muck about with it. So in this case, but not only converting it to a shape but then combining it into one unified shape, one unified vector shape. I kind of locked that in permanently. I've still got this flexible nature because of the layer styles that I'm using here. But just like an illustrator, you have this ability to combine them. I can take this copy of this and pasted back into illustrator or not have the exact same vector logo. So that's why I don't Some people that thought of designing a logo in in photo shop just makes him cringe, and I totally get that. But once you understand that you have at your disposal everything that you could do to a vector that you can an illustrator in terms of basic graphic basic logo type, you don't have the Grady INTs and things like that. But in terms of a basic logo type you have at your disposal everything that you do in Illustrator and that brings us to what you don't have an illustrator, and that's going to be these layer styles. So layer styles. When it comes to this idea of doing an illustrative version of type, and for a lot of time this is going to be a magazine masthead. This is gonna be a, you know, label for packaging design. This isn't probably going to be your logo design just because it's got too much complexity. The thing with, of course, a logo is It has to work in all these different applications, has to work on the letterhead, has to work on the website. It has to work on a cardboard box. It has to work in all these areas, so typically you're not going to get to illustrative not to organic. With the basic logo, you can do different versions of it, but again, every time you do different versions of a logo, there's a chance that you're going to dilute it as a brand, right, because every time everybody sees it over and over and over again the exact same things. They're not even thinking. It's a subliminal thing that you're building the brand. So what? Right now, we're kind of working with more typographical illustration. That could be for something where you're not worried about that. You know where you can get a little little fun Little funky like a label. Or, you know, it could be your own logo where, you know, you have absolute control about how it's gonna be used in terms of your website and stuff, But that brings us to and I think I will stay here for this. And that is this idea of layer styles now layer styles. And again, let's open up the layer styles, palette, what used to be known his layer effects. Um, you basically have all these different parameters over here on our left hand side, and each one of these has more options. So if we come up here with the blending options and we're gonna get to some of the special things you can do with blending options, including these down here, the often misunderstood advanced blending blending of sliders incredibly useful for doing illustration work, But each one of these different components. Stroke is gonna have all the different elements associate with a stroke in her shadow color overlay. And then we get into bevel in a Boston. There's a huge amount at your disposal here. These are gonna be measured in pixels. So as an example, this right here, the stroke on this image is measured in pixels. That means that this, um, logo has a certain resolution in pixels, a certain pixels per inch, so to speak that you have to keep in mind. We talked about this and the previous class about making sure that you've got enough information when you design something so that you can use it, as has its maximum size, the proverbial poster versus the app icon. Um so when it comes to the layer styles, they are designed when you save a layer style. And we already came up here and I created a layer style. I'm We'll just save this one right here, change this one. So we'll save this one, and I'm gonna open up one that we just created just a second ago. I did save that. Deny the topography, it's coming in. So this is the one that we did just a minute ago for, and we'll show it again. Um, they're all designed at a set pixels per inch of your document. So the nice thing about that the reason why Adobe didn't make it absolute, in other words, that even though the stroke on this one now is a nine, if I apply this to a graphic that's designed for the Web, it will automatically scale all these parameters for that new document, which is a little disconcerting because when you copy you create a style in one place and you apply it to a different one, it will change its appearance again. Like I said, it's a little disconcerting. The reason why I put this in here now, as this advanced course on layer style is, um, you should set. Typically, you don't have to worry about that. You should set. Let's go ahead. I want I want that layer style. Let's go back and find that one gonna go large list in here and we'll find that typography one, because I'd like that. Um, normally, you don't have to worry about pixels per inch. When you're designing per se, you need to worry about the overall dimension or size of the graphic, but you don't necessarily have to worry about the pixels per inch. So let's just do a little bit of, ah of, ah, um explanation about that, that I can see that a little bit better. So under image, image size, we've got this idea of pixels per inch, and you'll notice that this file is at 225 pixels per inch. Okay, dots per inch. Actually, don't relate to files dots per inch relate to devices. A screen has certain dots per inch that it displays. A printer has Emini dots per inch chicken spurred out dots per inch is related to a device. Pixels per inch is how many dots per inch are gonna be squished together on a printed page when you hit print and tell you hit print pixels per inch really is nebulous. If I turn off re sampling and set this to, um, 300 let's come up here and we'll set this two inches so you can see what we're doing. So this is a 10 by six document without re sampling turned on. If I set this to five pixels per inch. It says, Dude, you can print this that you know 468 inches because you're only gonna put five pixels pearling their inch on that print out it look a tad chunky at five pixels per inch, but it didn't change the size. The image size the file is exactly the same file does not care at all pixels per inch. If I set this up here to it's now going to be seven inch max versus the to 25 max, which was 10 inches, so you can see what was able to be printed. 10 inches is now seven, so the pixels printer isn't what I mentioned. This here is when it's good to understand it. 225 pixels per inch is a good, nice default resolution. It's 1.5 times your half tone screen is how that number came into existence. Adobe came up with that as a nice medium resolution that you can use. Some people think that the 300 pixels per inch is some sacred number that you have to have, or else you're you know, will be damned to hell for all eternity 2 25 is actually great for most purposes based upon what most half tone screens are, which is 150 lines per inch. That's another one of our per inch. Things is lines per inch, so mathematical formulas one point time. 1.5 times you have to on screen two times. Your half tone screen is the highest quality and get. And that's where people came into play people who are trying to match if you have ah, dp I printer and they're trying to figure out OK, the direct mathematical division of that is three to the pi over R squared and is really kind of irrelevant those things because they're using an irregular dot pattern toe try and match the dot pattern even though I'm gonna get in trouble by some people. Inkjet printers use stochastic screening. By definition, they're random patterns, the dot number of changes based upon how dark the ink is. There is no reason to have a set. P p I. For the jet printer to 25 is fine. I have designed all my styles at 2 25 because they work great. You can print it for offset lithography They're gonna print for most of your photographic work their print, beautiful canvases and gallery wraps and things like that. They're awesome. The reason why it's important here is to 25. File size is about half the file size as a 300 pixels French file printed at the same dimension. It actually will double your file size, not having more files, and you need found size more than you need is something we care about because you can work twice as fast. Yes, uh, you said nebulous. When you're talking about the pixels per inch, what's the limitations there? What are they on the amount of fixes? I'm just curious because you say 300 is what? Electable safe. But what's the I mean, how many pixels could you have? Like maximum? You could put 10 zillion in there. If we put in here, Let's say 3000 says dude, Fine, you're gonna have a postage stamp it at seventh of an inch. In other words, you want I haven't changed. The file sides is exactly the same dimensions you can see up here. The dimensions don't change because I turned off free sample. So what I'm doing is I'm telling it by pixel pp I is simply a little mathematical tag that goes along with a file does not change the file at all. Except for this little tag. When you hit command P, it says, Oh, you want it that many pixels squished together. Perlin, your inch Dude, you gotta be kidding me. Treat that. Okay, you said it. I'll do it so it doesn't matter. It's just a little thing that rides along with it. So there's no set maximum in terms of your practical value. Anything over 300 I think, is gonna be overkill. Even if you're put into a glossy stock or metallic paper, 300 is should be fine unless you're craftsmanship is so bad that you're hiding bad edges that you've selected and stuff the minimum that you could use if you used 1 50 If you're doing gallery wraps or printing on watercolor paper, then you could probably get away with 1 because the media itself, the substrate will either have dot gain because it's an unquoted stock or it has texture on it, which will hide the pixels so you can get away with a lot mawr. If you're depending upon the paper, your paper pretty on very, very good questions to 25. I mentioned that it is a great overall resolution, and my layer styles are designed for that. And the reason for that. Why, that's kind of good to know. And let's go back up here to our hype Here is that, um when we design had another layer style and again in the layer styles palette, which you can also get to down here, it's actually known as the blending options down here under the curse of s FX layer styles here, the upper left actually loads them to you. I have a styles palette that I use all the time, but this lets you see them. These are the ones that are built into photo shop. So they have a few little ones that you can take a look at. Um uh, they're all bad miner. All good, Very simple. Um, what gets kind of interesting is when you start getting into some of these dimensional effects and rather than Jim's, let me load in one of these 20 libraries. And as I mentioned the previous class these aerial part of my 1-click Wow Presets Library, 900 presets and photo shop. Um, that is available at wow creative arts dot com. That's my website. So wow, creative arts dot com, and you will find them there. But if we come into, let's do a metal and I like a pending these. If you say OK, it's going to replace. And the problem with that is, you're gonna be making your own layer styles or you're gonna take one of my layer styles, tweak it, fine, tune it, re save it, and you don't want to replace it. In other words, I would throw away my entire library of layer styles here if I said OK, so if in doubt, always append any presets and Photoshopped brings up a nice, big global point is, any time you do anything in Photoshopped, figure out how to automate that process so you don't have to do it again. But something cooler, the layer style save it. If it's something that's a few steps right in action, if it's a tool setting, save it as a tool preset. There's no reason for you to do the same bloody thing over and over and over again. And I'm afraid that's what most people dio is every single day, every single image, they're recreating the wheel. And there's so much you can do to automate this in photo shop As an example, layer styles are a perfect example of that, you know? So again there are all sorts of things so well through some of these or textures again, the fact these were all live these could be done to live type or look live logo. You know, whatever you'd like Abalone crystal. Everybody needs abalone. Crystal logo. We did the strokes and the previous class again. All of these air customizable. So these air kind of ones that working on I want to bring up the metal cause I've got some kind of cool metal ones. Everybody needs PLASCHKE. This is the plaster gold one that I like, But, um, this actually is kind of one of my nice rusted ones and you've got your chiseled steals, But let's take a look at one of these here because understanding the palate is going to allow you to do all sorts of incredibly cool, groovy bitch and stuff, as we say Technically, it's known as bitchin, and it will again take you that much further. So whether it's a stroked graphic or a textural one, let's just take a look at a couple of these parameters here and that can that can help you. So what we have is we have first off the now these air have changed how they are displayed before photo shop CS six. These were just random. They had nothing to do with how they were applied There now applied in this order from the top to the bottom. So the bevel in em boss here, which is giving us this effect, is the top and the drop shadow is at the bottom. So now they're organized based upon how they're actually applied. So now they makes a lot more sense. They work exactly the same as they used to. They just now were listed in their order. Some people didn't understand why, If you added a color overlay, the color overlay took priority over a pattern overlay. And that's why the pattern is underneath it. So the color is on top. Okay, so as opposed to if you flipped it but the bevel in Boss what's kind of nice. You have your dimensional effects here, and you can do your highlight and shadow mode, and I'll let you play around with that. But you can. All of these you can changed the parameters they're set to screen and multiply as a default. This is the highlight in the shadow, but you can change that to color dodge or linear dodge. Those are two of the nice ways of doing a highlight, and you can see I change the color here from black to white to give it a different color. You can't change the angle of the light source in here, and a nice thing to remember about the light source is as you move the light source closer to coming straight down the incline. The incident of the light, the Mawr The light is coming at a right angle. It's lower down on the horizon line. The matter. The dusty Matt Rubber look is going to be as you take that light and move it further up. It's gonna become Mawr speculator, and it will actually make it look shiny. So something as simple as moving the light from the edge to the center is going to allow you. And let's just jump over to one of our our gems because this rusted metal isn't going to come. Service as well, though, probably will do it. Let's come over here to something that's got texture on it. So coming over here to that bevel in and boss, if I take that, um light and move it out to the edge, it's not as shiny. Matter of fact, it's gonna get a little bit mad as I move it up. You're going to see that those speculate highlights, and at some point it hits and you get this nice speculate highlight along all the contours. If we come up here and you something like this bevel in Boss, When will take that size down so it follows the contour of our logo a little bit more. This angle right here and the altitude is what's determining that this is shiny. If I take it off to the edge, it's becoming Matt. As I move it up, it's going to become mawr and mawr shiny, including at some point where it's actually the entire surface of it is getting hit by the light. Does that make sense there's we could do a month long seminar on layer style. So I'm going to give you the secret Mickey Mouse Club. Handshakes related to layer styles. Okay, one that that altitude makes all the difference in the world with whether you have a matt surface or a shiny surface. Got it to Don't forget that you have patterns at your disposal that you could bring on them. In this case, I've got this kind of marble opal kind of vein surface in here. These are all textures that I created, and but you have at your resource anything that you can make a pattern of. Remember how you make patterns and Photoshopped anything that you have visible. You go edit defined pattern, turns it into a pattern and are painting class. I just finished in San Francisco last week at Creativelive Painting with photo shop, we talked about how you can create patterns. You notice all these painting source patterns in here because you can actually use the pattern. Stamp Tool wasn't really designed for doing a lot of painting, but it does amazing paintings, including watercolors, by turning the entire document into a painting what you'll probably use it for is you'll use it for adding in all sorts of other patterns these air part of again, that one click wow pattern set one Click Wow! Action set from wild creative arts dot com Plug, plug, Snake Oil Cell Right there, Andi. I've got fabric, marble media, miscellaneous surface noise and organic patterns. So it is an example would just get fun and will say fabric because everybody needs to have pineapples as a, um, pattern in there repertoire. The thing to remember about these is that one. You can move them any time you use a pattern, not only their cool, because you can put patterns into type like this. But if you'll notice there's a little love note up here from Adobe to you, did you know that you can click and drag to reposition that pattern and you say No, I didn't know. OK, so now it's a little bit slow so I can move that pattern anywhere. I want to have it line up exactly with the logo where I want this one. I use it for adding a Jess Oh, and pattern of strokes brushstrokes to a painting, and I want to get the breast strokes to kind of lineup, so there's not a big dab right in the middle of the bride's cheek so you can move your patterns around. You can also snap into the origin, which is nice, because under that bevel in and boss another little secret. Mickey Mouse Club handshake. How we're getting this irregular textures to these graphics. If you say you know what, I'd love you to use a texture as part of this graphic and you know what? Could you use that exact same pattern as the source for this bevel in and boss? So let's come up here and change our lights source so you can kind of see it. It's a little bit hard to see cause it's so shiny, but it's actually following the contours. Let's take this size down. That's probably what's going on here, and you can see that it's falling. That's we've got to make that texture on bevel in, Boss, the size we got soften. No wonder. OK, so here you can you have all these different parameters. So now we've got the texture is actually from the pineapples is actually being used to, um em boss our logo so you can use the exact same texture, not only as a pattern for color, but what's known in the three D world is a bump map. So we've actually just brought in. Could be the logo of a company. Anything that could be a pattern and everything could be a pattern can be brought in, and there's nothing stopping you from, you know, using it for texture ring. And that's where some of these things like this come in, where I'm using the same abalone texture to both. I'm light the scene or bump the logo as well as add pattern to it. Okay, makes sense. Another one of the things in here that has this little love note from Adobe is coming down here to the drop shadow. We can come up here and you'll notice that there's a little love nor the Trop that says that. Did you know that you can click and drag to reposition that shadow? And in this case, it's always good to say No, thank you. I didn't and be very appreciative. You can also come up here when you're doing the drop shadow you can say use global light And now when you change the direction of the drop shadow, you'll notice that the light that's lighting the logo is sheen for the logo. Actually, we come over here and say, Devlin, boss, use global light. Now these two are going to be locked together. So that means the drop shadow and the light source are always going to be coming from the same angle. Okay, so both of those are now it's in C. I'm changing the light. And for those of you who do video, um, what's really cool is one of the things that could be animated in the timeline in photo shop and especially now in a photo shop CC, which has an awesome video editor built into it, Um, you can animate layer styles, which means you can animate the direction of the light source, which means that you can start off your animation over here with the light coming from the upper left and a drop shadow that's coming down real close, go to the last key frame set that as a separate key frame. Have the light coming over from over here, and the drop shadow is now 10 feet away and will you play that animation? Your logo will all of a sudden have the light go across the end but also moving in the distance because the lot the drop shadow will move as if the light was getting closer to the surface. All sorts of things you could do in layer styles. They are animate herbal in the timeline within Adobe four video. Um, let's go back to one that we started in the previous class to this one, which is yes. And if you have questions, you feel free to stop me. That one called typography because this is one here that I applied that looks slightly different than what it was before to this logo here and this. I wanted to show you the elements of this layer style and also mentioned one other thing that's in here. This is We started off with that other little piece of type that was just the hype type. This is what we did in the previous class, and we used another piece of type for doing are turning. One thing I wasn't able to mention in terms of the designing of type is the fact that if we look at this little icon here. This has actually got a type warp applied to it. So this right here, let's go back When you have a piece of type, I have that type player active. I have the type tool active, the type tool. Since its active its options bar is now available in the top of the bar. As part of that, there's this one little button that's been around in photo shop for 100 years called type, warp and type warp lets you actually, um, warp your life type. This is actually live type, and you can use any one of these what are known as envelopes in order to warp your life type. If you say you've got a logo that's already been converted from life type into something else, you have image Warp, which uses exact same technology. So if you do a commander control T, you have image warp. If you have live type, you can do the exact same technology taking advantage of type war. So in this case, we could come up here, we could do an ark, okay, And again, you have these sliders to change it. You'll also notice the nice thing is about it, since these are done with a layer style that the layer style just simply follows along with the graphic, there's no distortion. It re renders its perfectly razor sharp. The layer style could care less what you do on that layer. It's always gonna be applied to the transition between opaque and transparent. Since we're dealing with typography or a logo, all of that's gonna be a shape, razor sharp edge. Your layer styles will also be razor sharp. So that's a very, very cool thing I had used to. That you're going to use probably all the time is Arc and Arch Arch is going to allow you to not have it. Bo. It's going to keep straight horizontal lines on the edge, but it does allow you to shift it up or down. So that's the proverbial logo. You know that's going up or down. One that he used here. Waas flag and flag allowed me to do this Nice little you know, cursive, you know, is as much as I want. So there is my little you know, flag warp. All of that being done to a piece of life type this is again that thirsty, rough, very cool typeface that is so incredibly trendy. But I do like it. Okay. And again, let's look at a layer style before we do a little bit more and just analyze it because most people are using the A layer style for that dimensional work. But terms of this kind of graphic element a lot of people don't realize that you can use it for more flat edge graphics in this case, something I think that looks like kind of an old letter press or even airbrushed. You can also put in that I mentioned before that color overlay and the color overlay. Guess what you can do those color libraries, PMS colors So you can come up here and design a layer style that not only has the effects, the overlays, whatever you're gonna dio, but can also have a very set color to it that's associated with that client and as close as possible. Then you can say, even though we've modified this logo, we've done all this cool stuff. We know it's still Coca Cola red because we come up here and say 185 and that's going to still stay. Coca Cola Red. OK, And I wanted to be Coca Cola Red, and I don't want to use a color overlay, but layer styles are great. And, uh, in case I don't get to it, it edit presets. Preset manager. You can select any presets you make and then save them off as your own library. So you'd say client X layer styles, you know, and that would be how you do it. So just in case we went out, okay, But a few things here and this one, we've got a stroke. Like I said, you've got a lot at your disposal. Let's see if we can get this in the same in the same graphic. Not likely. So you've got size and outside normal color. The thing that I like with thestreet oak, I'm I chose the color. Any time that you come up in here, you can click on your color picker, and then you got your eye dropper. So if I want that, you know, stroke to be read or the background color or the green or the blue. So in this case, I just did it on the background, but I wanted to make it look almost a Ziff there, You know, the stroke was a whole So remember that you can always choose elements from within it. I have an inner shadow in here and much like with drop shadows. I don't I'm not using the inner shadow as an inner shadow. I'm using it. And then we kind of got a dark blue here. I'm using it as, and let's kind of exaggerate this. Um and it's gonna be hard for me to do that. Let's do it in a normal blend boat. I'm using it as a halo. I used shadows and drop shadows in the shadows and that as a halo. So it's again adding this little old kind of airbrushed effect as if this has been laid down and somebody took an old time airbrush and laid it in. So I love inner shadows to add some dimensionality to it. And just this little again, I call it Art Deco, um, kind of Halo two. It also going to add noise to it, and noise is going to get me this little patina, this little texture to it that's going to make it a little bit less plasticky. So It's gonna be hard to see here because of on the texture of the interior. But I'm adding a little texture. It's probably easier to see here this drop shadow that is coming along the edge here of it's actually gonna be here to see this little shape has a textured drop shadow, but I'll add it to this one. This drop shatter right here as I take up the noise is gonna get this little irregular, you know, spatter effect to it. So that's also something that most people don't use. And again, I've got an outer glow in this case and the thing that I'll mention here and why it's kind of unique when it comes to layer styles. And let me kind of exaggerate this for teaching purposes is, um, this portion of the layer style is called outer glow and, of course, by definition, a glow. You typically think of something light or shiny. It's glowing. It's light. Just because something is named something doesn't mean you have to use it for that. I actually want a second dairy drop shadow. I want to drop shadows. You know where you don't have to drop shadows, but I want to jump shadows, so I'm going to get to drop shadows because I know that basically, the glow as a default starts off in screen mode with white. That means that the light color that's going to screen it subtract out that light and you get a glow effect. But there's nothing stopping you from changing it to something like overlay or multiply or anything else and changing the color to black or dark. In other words, I'm using what's supposed to be a bright ning halo effect, and I'm now gonna make it a dodging and burn edge effect on it in addition to my drop shadow. So if we look at this here this outer glow, you can see how it's exaggerating, the logo popping off the page, and it's distinct from my drop shadow. Okay, so just because something is called something doesn't mean you have to use it for that. The fact that we're able to do, um, a huge amount of design work in one fell swoop, non destructively that I can share it and save it. So maybe I might even get to go home at night is really, really cool. That's why I get so excited. That's why I've created 500 layer styles as part of that library. But anyway, and I've also got hear that noise option, and that's also allowing me because I've got this wonderful textured background, a Istock photo background here. The outer glow is also got this nice little patina to it. Okay, so there's my exaggerated effect, and here it is. You can turn it on and off. So there's that little eyeball so you can see all it off. Last thing in terms of this one that I'll just share with you, and you can see that it's actually a red logo that changes colors. I went over this green backdrop, so I actually kind of liked that we turn off that backdrop, you'll see the this is how that style works without a green backdrop. Um, the last thing is the color, and in this case, this Clower, this color is this almost fluorescent blue. Now I can change it up here with this live type. Remember, this is still live type. I can change it up here, but I want to have more control. If I want to make this a layer style. That is always gonna be these corporate colors. I don't want toe Presuppose that somebody's going to choose the right color up in the options bar. When they click that style, I want to take absolute control over it. And so the last thing I'll do on this effect is I'm gonna come over here and I'm gonna do color overlay. And as we saw before, whatever color I do here, including something like a Pantone color, I'm now I'm switching over. And it's now going to be Let's do you know green or something like that? It's now I think I need a much paler green and I hope need is brighter green. Okay, so it's always gonna be Pantone 77 25 and I have overridden the purple. That's actually the color of the type. Okay, so now that is going to be part of it. And now when I save this new style, we'll call it type two. It has the green with it. So no matter what I apply it to, um, it will stay the same color. Okay. And as a reminder, I'm gonna come up here and make another really cool shape real quick. Let's turn off this logo and let's see what we have when you come down here to the amoeba icon as part of the shape tool, the little amoeba star. Now, all of a sudden, you have all the options Associate ID with the custom shape icon over here. I mentioned before the idea that photo shop has a zillion shapes built into it. Clicking on this shows you the library. I come up here and let's say I'm gonna reset the shapes. These are the ones that ship with it that you may have come across and again all of these pallets dealing with presets and photo shop. You can either do it as thumbnails. Large thumbnails are I like large list where you can see the name. But actually for thes the the large thumbnails, probably a good one. You have all these different shapes at your disposal, including some that I'm that are part of my set. But so I can say film edges and I will upend. So now I've got some different film shapes at my disposal. And of course, you have your copyright trademark in TM. But you may we just want to do this. These don't take up a lot of memory. That's another nice thing about vector shapes is that they're very memory efficient versus pixels. So I going to say all just go ahead. Yes and yes, well, placed them all because I know all means all. And now I've got my entire clip art library at my disposal that's built into illustrator. And the nice thing about this is, once you bring in, we'll do this in a second. But actually, let's just go ahead and do this. We'll come over here, drag out this graphic that we do that Commander Control T will spin it around. Maybe since we've got that commander control T going on well, look up here and see that image war by mentioned before that type work. Come over here. I can now fine tune our bend or warp the shape anyway, that I'd like if you didn't know that's in there again. That's fantastic. Will use this in a second for wrapping a logo around another. But the great thing about this is that I have at my disposal those styles in this case I'm gonna use the styles palette rather than the dialog box, and we'll just come up here and do that, Okay? And one last thing is very cool about thes layer styles Is looking at this. I'm layer, um that I can do a commander control h you go. Well, this is so much bolder than that type. I see that it's the same, but it doesn't have the impact on this much bigger giant logo. The other thing to remember is, even though this has all these different parameters of strokes and shadows and colors and glows and things like that, if you right, click on the cursive f, you can also scale these effects all at one time, so I can go into an individual one. Or I can come up here and scale all these effects at one time. Okay, so that is cool. It's incredibly cool. And then I can come over here and go. You know what? I want to find Tune something like just that stroke. So you have at your disposal a huge amount of plethora of options, and I want to make that drop shadow a little bit, you know, so you can customize and then re save it as another style in ways that you could never do it if you were doing it in the olden days with Sade layers and duplicating layers, which actually mean just give you one more graphic. This in the olden days, IHS how you would and I think I've got this loss engine, Let's come up here and is up. This is that original style that I did that had that little kind of, um, uh, marble effect to it. These air the layers that you would need to create that different effect. And in the olden days before layer styles, that's exactly what you do. You duplicate the layer, you blur it, you'd offset it. You do all these things you're chained. Blend change blend modes in order to get the resulting image. And I think I've got that actual graphic here. So this is that layer style, and that was the number of layers you would need in order to make it. These are all the steps associated with it. This just like that little leaf color fun. If I come over here and select a portion of this element, I can reshape the effect will automatically change the contours. The last thing that I'll give you in terms of layer styles and working with that is just like you can scale the layer effects. If you come over here and right click on it, you can also say create layers, create layers, he says. Are you sure you want to do this is so cool and non destructive? And I say, yes, there's every single layer that would be necessary to create that effect. The reason why you would do that is for something like your drop shadow. Okay, it could be that you want to warp that drop shadow in some special way, okay? You want to make it come and be all of a sudden, the cash shadow. Okay, so now that is floating on it like that. So understanding that you can create layers from something that's done with layer style so I could take that nice, wonderful type that's floating on the graphic and all of a sudden make it seem like it's, you know, five feet off the page. And now casting a shadow, um, is, I think, very cool. Okay, so those are some of the things. Let's also do another thing I mentioned a This is a logo from the previous class taking advantage of the vector brushes available in Illustrator. I want to make this even a little bit more painterly in here. I've brought it into but a shop. It is a smart object by double click on it, open it back up into illustrator, where I have access to all the different elements that make it up. We're not gonna do that so back in here. But the nice thing is is that I can now add things to this. And in this case, what I want to do is I won't apply some filter effects because this is a smart object would be really neat if I applied the filters to it in a nondestructive way. And one of the things that I have ISS a little action that does that. And these are I called filtered painting actions. And one of them is called a smart object painting, starting with a smart object. And I'm gonna click on that action and I'll just show you what it does afterwards. So you'll get the idea for it. Uh, actually, I will not do that because I did not take into account actions are make calls to photo shop. And I had mentioned that, um, things like p p I r. Things you need to take into account before you had something like a layer style This action just because I are so rarely I'm gonna filter a image mode. C m y que graphic. We talked about this before this was set up for C M y que. If you look at your filters in your filter's dialog box Ah, lot of your filters are not available. Like oil paint. They don't work in the c m y que color space. They're just not even available. So, um, if you run an action and it just kind of says, Dude, I don't know what you're doing I did not make that action applicable for C m. Y que and I did that on purpose, he says, because I'd hate to convert something that you thought was ready for print converted to RGB without your knowing it. And then later on, you think you're ready to print and you can. But I am going in this case, gonna go image mode RGB and I'm not gonna rast arise it, and I'm not gonna merge it so it stays exactly the same. So now it's RGB. Now I'm gonna take this little layer style and I'll make sure and give it as part of this class. And what it did is automatically turned my little pseudo brushstroke, um, logo into a much more organic looking logo in one fell swoop. And I like one fell swoop. And I'll just give you this recipe speaking about doing, you know, illustrative work. The nice thing is, it did it for the logo, did it for the background. Did everything in here. The reason why this is kind of cool is it takes advantage. This is the recipe here. The median filter simplifies, and that's what I ran it again. I'll give you this graphic as well, which will include the graphic and this smart filter recipe on it. That's a nice thing about smart filter Smart filters. Just like layer styles, you can drag and drop a smart filter recipe from one document to another that shares also has a smart object on it, and it'll automatically apply it to their so smart filter recipes, which is what we're looking at here like layer styles are completely share a bill between documents. They're cool. They're groovy. They're awesome, their non fattening. Why wouldn't you use them? Okay, so median filter simplifies. The image keeps edges sharp, but it simplifies subtleties. The well paid filter is doing the magic I'll take. I'll show you what the settings are. In a second. The M Boss filter is giving us our raise services. The oil paint filter has something called Shine in There, which doesnt, boss, which I don't particularly care for, certainly is not very good for Portrait's, but very you can boss after the fact, by running a filter called In Boss, which lets you control the M boss much more. They're much more controlled fashion than the oil paint filter. And then these two filter galleries are rough, pastel and texturizing, and that's what's giving us are skipping of the brushstrokes. I'm across the surface of the image, so that is what's going on here. And the oil paint, which is new, came in with photo shop. CS six is where this simplification came in, and these wonderful organic brushstrokes and basically you're gonna set it. All of I would recommend maxing out your cleanliness scale bristle detail these a lot of these have to do with if you add the shine that's this little in boss. So I purposely have that shine turned off. But the stylization is how much detail that you want in the file. So as I come over here and take it down to zero, you're going to see it's much more like my original. And then up here, you just drag in how much stylization or simplification you want. I'll take that down a little bit. It's gonna rear under rear ender the whole thing. Now it's a little bit more rough. And that rough pastel filter right here is what's creating that little offset? Okay, so that is what is giving us are skipping over the surface. So this is this example of a smart filter recipe, um, that could be used for logos as well as for things like Portrait's. It's something that I used in, um, the painting class and that we just finished. And, uh, yes, perfect time would to ask me a question. Yes, absolutely. Right. So a net de que from Palm Beach has a lot of questions for us, so thank you, Annette. Good. But one question. I have several digital rubber stamps which I can use as brushes or overlays or masks. Is it possible to convert a digital stamp into a custom shape? Yes. Um, So, yes. Let me show you how to do it. Because that came up. That was the same thing about your signature. How do you do that? So let me do that. Let me. I'm just going to show you. Yes, please. This is a portrait that I was commissioned to do of Princess Diana. And this is using a combination of that oil pain filter as well as the mixer brush. So if you have any desire to do this sort of stuff, this is the pattern stamp that I mentioned. This is another action that automates the process of doing sketching. Um, so these air all paintings done in photo shop as part of that class, which I just absolutely I loved doing so. Watercolors and what you can do. I was looking for the graphic design the poster because the poster, this is not the final poster. The final poster. Yeah, it's similar to to this so This is a painting from a little photograph, an IPhone photograph of the Santa Cruz statue and then, using the mixer brush and that oil paint filter, actually hand painted it and added the patterns. What we talked about, and it's really cool in the fact that there's no real brushstrokes in there that is completely hand painted in Photoshopped, not painter, is what we covered in class, and I just perhaps I think it's it's bitchin. This isn't the final one, but anyway, so to answer your question, let's actually do that and, Ah, and go back into Photoshopped, go back and find a logo. So let's say that, um, that this right here is something that we want to turn into a stamp that we can use or it's a signature. One of the questions during the break was, I've got a signature and I want to turn that into a shape that I can keep in. Photo shop is part of my clip art that's there forever. So in this case, I want to rough in this up a little bit, so I've got an action that that's you guys won't. Maybe I'll give it to you guys. It's part of my graphic enhanced actions, and I call it distressed, and it automatically, um, does this to the file so it automatically gives you that eroded edge, and it's really cool. If you use that in concert with those layer styles, it's almost as if I planned this. So those layer styles like my medals Okay, so that pitted surface. So that was the what? That effect. Here it is, you know, without the running that action that distressed and it does just some. I'll put that on there for everybody cause that give me a couple days. But I'll make give that debate because that's kind of a tease. The nice with my actions. They all keep it all the layers, and so you can kind of see what it's doing, and you can dissect the action. But let's get rid of that. Do you want to show that action and give that to you guys and we will consider that this right here is a stamp, Okay, Or let's say that it's a scanned logo. Whatever it is, I'm gonna go ahead and will flatten this image so we have a black and white graphic So it's a stamp. It's something that you've got that you bought or purpose or made is your signature that your hand wrote out. How can I turn this into a vector shape that I can continue to manipulate and do really cool stuff with as certainly how can I get it? So it's on transparency, so it's perfect, so I don't have to select it in any way other than absolute perfection. Here's how to do it. Ready? You go into your channels, you go into your channels palette on. Let's actually get rid of that one. That's already there. The channels palette that the tip is is that if you command or control, click on any thumbnail and photo shop. It will load that layer as a selection. If you command or control, click on any layer in footer shop. It will load that layer in as a selection, so live type graphics, logos, anything. It will load the transparency. It will find the edge, and it will load that as a selection commander control clicking on it. As a matter of fact, if you look at the logo as soon as I hold down the command key the icon for the finger gives me the Marquis. It's telling me it's going to select it. The problem is, in this case, this has no transparency. I can't select it. If I command click on it, it's going to select the outside of the layer. Okay, but if I go to the channels palette channels are actually in the in of themselves selections their masks. If you create an Alfa Channel of the bottom, it's making a mask. The nice thing is about scanned artwork. If you command or control, click on any one of these channels, and if you have colored artwork, you can choose which one is the most the coolest. Or you could drag one of them down to the new channel icon, and then you could use your levels and curves and whatever else you fine tune it so you're gonna get your signature. It'll be on your main layer in photo shop. Okay, again, You get your logo here, you're gonna come to the channels palette. You're gonna look through the channels and find one that's got the best contrast for you. That's presupposing. It's in color already. Drag it down to the new channel icon. Now you've got it here. Now you can use levels or curves or brightness or whatever you want to come up here and, you know, change it and then I can load this as a selection in Photoshopped. Okay, As a default You when you know, with working with Mass, the white areas, what selected and the black hair is what's not selected. You remember that with layer Blair masks. So first off, I have to select this. And if you come down here at the bottom here, it's saying Load channel as selection or use that shortcut command or control. Click man, Click on the Mac control click on PC. And now I've got marching ants of the tonal range of that image. It's perfect. I didn't use the tragic wand. I didn't mask it. I didn't use any selection technique. It is a perfect selection of that black and white Justus. If it was a layer mask, it's the white that selected not the logo. Okay, I don't need that. So, under selection, since I have a selection, you're gonna select and in verse that now I've got my logo. I've got my hands signature. I've got my digital stamp that we're talking about here and now we're going to go over to the paths palette and the paths palate down here at the bottom. Since I have marching ants, you need to have marching ants. You can come over here, make work path from selection, click. And now I've got a complete vector shape of my logo. Okay, Um logo signature. Whatever it iss my my stamps or whatever. I just made vector information. Now, before I do anything else that is so cool that I've got that its resolution independent, I could not bring it into illustrator to fine tune it. I could do whatever I want. I can come up here and go edit defined custom shape. I'm now gonna put this into my custom shape library, just like the 50 other little training little things that are built into photo shop. This now is gonna be my dusted K logo. When I come over here to my custom shaped tool and go down here to the bottom, there is my dusty K, um, logo. And if I'll just go ahead and create another layer on top and we'll fill it with white So now what I could do and Aiken de select my work path back in my layers palette. I can even choose a different color. I've got my tool active, click and drag. And then here is now my vector version of my dusty K logo resolution independent. Able to do whatever I want, including going into my trendy little layer styles and do whatever I want and in the past, palette. If you go into your preferences, the panel options are where when you create a new work path and here New path, if you use that, it's not the new path we have only have to have marching and selected back to the paths palette, and you come up here and say, Make work path used the icon. It just gives you the default make work path here gives you the tolerant setting. So that's where you can set the tolerance, because I know that was gonna be one of your questions, questions, questions, starting our studio audience, and then we'll head over to the Internet. E. I know that that was a number of steps ahead and plan on covering it. That just happened to be because people had asked that on DSO. That's was why we did that. Yes, question I have to reveal What's it gonna get home? Because he did so many things that it's It's over my hand. Yeah, well, the steps just for that last one is your logo. Go to your channels palette and at the bottom of the channels pad, and you can choose one of the challenges they make selection. Once you have marching ants, you probably want to invert that selection, and then you go to the past palette and that'll pop out, says make work path. That's it. You've got your path. Once you've got the path, you go under the editor in the same place where you could define a pattern or brush. Right below it is defined custom shape. So that was where the main steps on that technique so good. Could you could you make more than one? You certainly couldn't. You could make his many as you want and bringing this mini scanned element as you want. That library of shapes can hold unlimited. You can have all the logos of all your clients, which you definitely should, and again what I would typically do is bring the logo and copy and paste it from illustrator. Once it is in photo shop, you don't don't trace it or anything else like that. If you got a logo that's already vector. Bringing in a photo shop assumes it's there again. If we go back to, um, this, um, it's a this document. If we go into one that's already vector, there's nothing stopping you. This is a vector shape that, let's say whether we created here or not edit. Define custom shape. Now my hype logo is in my library, so copy and pasted from Illustrator. If you can see these lines that make up a shape, you can make it a custom shape. Don't retrace it. That's when your hand drawing it or doing these stamps that were talked about before. Okay, question from the Internet. Yes, a satin gal is wondering. Is the layer styles panel that you're working on right now? Is that a new look for the creative cloud, or is there a studying you can change? And CS six mine doesn't look like that. The one thing that, uh, the change came into CS six. It was before CS six. That orders I mentioned didn't used to be based upon the Lord of the Order in which they were done. Um, they were, uh, ordered this way. But this should be This is basically how is look for the last decade. So there, if it for some reason you're not seeing this, the layer styles palette again found under here the curse of effort the bottom and saying blending options. This is where you're gonna find it should be virtually identical. The nice thing is, is these layer styles, even though I created them most of them years ago, they work in any version of photo shop, so you can go back into photo shop, you know, seven and most of these air still gonna work. Okay, I would just I would just show, um, different things that you could do. This is you know, I'll just because I can ask you one more question. OK, so hiding effects, you know. So this is kind of flat artwork. This is the artwork with adding the dimensionality to it of layer styles and what you're able to do to it. So in terms of illustrative work on it, um, there's a lot more than way. We'll just say that that the one I did in again this is kind of a short version of my graphic design essentials, which is another full day class here. Creativelive. One thing that I did on this one there is that caffeine cubed logo still in vector format. I'm gonna do a commander control tea and take advantage of that image warp. And, um actually, before image warble kind of get it close to the, uh, rotations. So, commander, control for free transform, then click on image Warp, then say, I would like to use a little arc and I can come up here and I'm just going to kind of find Tune it, Teoh, get it in there. When you're in image warp like this, you can go in and out of these envelopes. This is where you choose them over here so I can use custom as well as a warp. You'll notice that I have all my vectors at my disposal. Just as if I was working in Illustrator. I can work on all these different parameters because this is Resolution independent. I'm working on a vector shape. Okay, I can do as much as I would like it. That's this Cup kind of comes in on the center, so I can customize that if I turn off image warp, using this icon up here in the left eye can still find Tune it in terms of it's vector nature. It still hasn't rendered it. I can jump back in as much as I'd like. It kind of would like this to come in a little bit, and then once I'm done, I can hit the check box. And then remember, one of the cool things with us and graphic designers and how we mock up products is blend modes. It's a number of blend modes that are extremely cool and groovy. Remember your Dodge and burn blend modes? If I want a Dodge and burn this logo into this graphic, I can come over here to something like overlay. And what that did is it allowed me to blend this image in. Let's undo that. Here it is the black logo on the graphic. By changing it to overlay, I can get the exact same shine, she suspects. Suspect sheen, speculate, highlight and blend in my logo into the cup this is I would like so and that is still a vector shape. So and that could come in from, you know, where else. So that was one more thing I want to do. That's again from my graphic design essentials class.

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Jack Davis - Follow Along Files.zip

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