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The Post-production Process

Lesson 42 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

The Post-production Process

Lesson 42 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

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Lesson Info

42. The Post-production Process

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1 Introduction

1

Welcome to the Class

02:12
2

What Makes a Great Video

03:17
3

What Type of Video Should You Make

02:47

Chapter 2: Pre-production

4

Come up with a Great Video Ideas

05:05
5

Plan Your Video

03:30
6

The Pre-production Checklist

04:04

Chapter 3 Equipment - Our Suggestions for Getting Started

7

Does Equipment Matter

01:34
8

Our Recommended Cameras

06:00
9

Our Recommended Audio Equipment

04:37
10

Our Recommended Lighting Equipment

01:47
11

Our Recommended Editing Equipment

02:11
12

Our Recommended Drone Equipment

05:35
13

Quiz: Chapter 3

Chapter 4:Cinematography Basics

14

Exposing Your Shots

05:25
15

Compose Your Shots

04:25
16

Filming Yourself

01:09
17

Getting the Right Shot

03:43
18

Choose a Background

02:32
19

My Office Video Setup

02:54
20

Quiz: Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Tips for Shooting with Different Cameras

21

Exposing with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

06:31
22

Focus with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

02:35
23

Stabilize Your Shots

02:57
24

Know Your Lenses

03:18
25

Shoot with Your Smartphone

05:10
26

Shoot with Your Webcam

05:49
27

Record Great Screencast Videos

04:20
28

Tips for Better Drone Shots

04:06
29

Types of Drone Shots

01:43
30

Quiz: Chapter 5

Chapter 6: Audio Recording and Microphones

31

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

03:14
32

Record Better Audio in Any Environment

01:27
33

How to Use a Lavalier Microphone

02:47
34

How to Use a Shotgun Microphone

00:55
35

How to Record Audio with Your Computer

01:27
36

Quiz: Chapter 6

Chapter 7: Video Lighting

37

Why We Light

01:03
38

Use Natural Light

04:14
39

The 3-point Video Lighting Setup

07:26
40

Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Editing Better Videos

41

Intro to Editing

02:15
42

The Post-production Process

07:50
43

Craft a Story with Editing

05:21
44

Improve Your Audio with Editing

06:34
45

Find and Add Music

05:12
46

Design Clean and Professional Titles

03:15
47

Increase Video Engagement with Calls to Action

01:29
48

Quiz: Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Get More Views - Publishing Your Video Online

49

Export the Best Quality Video for Online

02:54
50

Tips for Posting Online

05:28
51

Grow Your Youtube Channel

04:41
52

Quiz: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Case Studies: Real-world Filmmaking

53

Case Study - Corporate Promo Videos with Ghirardelli Chocolate

08:54
54

Case Study - Event Videography with Major Lazer

08:39
55

Case Study - Documentary Films with Phil

14:24
56

Case Study - Shooting By Yourself

15:32
57

Case Study - Wedding Videography

08:37
58

Case Study - Phil's Livestream Setup

04:23

Chapter 11: Conclusion

59

Thank You

00:59

Final Quiz

60

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

The Post-production Process

here are the basic steps to editing your video. Remember no matter what application you're using. These are the steps that you should be doing. The first is more of not just a step but something that you have to be aware of throughout the entire process and that's organization even before you start filming. But especially after you stop filming and you bring that footage into your computer importing onto your computer or to an external hard drive. You want to think about staying organized. I always have a similar folder structure for my video editing projects. So within one project folder, I'll have individual sub folders for footage which includes more sub folders for each camera or each day that we shoot also, I'll have a folder for audio for music, for graphics, for exports and for sequences or projects. I often create a new project or save a new project every day or every couple of days so that I have the last one available. If I want to revert back to it. I also have auto save tur...

ned on on my application while I use premiere pro but you can typically turn on auto safe in most editing applications so that if it does crash you do have that backup and I keep that organization on my computer whether it's on an external hard drive or on my computer itself and I copy that organization inside the editing application as well. So when I bring in footage when I bring in music, when I bring in photos, graphics, whatever it is into premiere pro, I keep a folder structure there as well. That's the same so that if I ever lose footage or misplace footage or need to add footage or move it around. I know exactly where I can find it both in my project, but also in my documents. So the key here is to stay organized. Now, the next step, once you have your footage organized on your computer is to import it, bring it into your application and organize it, keep it organized. The next step depends on what type of video you're doing. But if you're recording something like what I'm doing right now where I'm recording video and perhaps what we were doing outside where we were recording with lava lair mike and a webcam or a regular camera, you have to sync up your audio and video footage. This is matching the audio and the video so that what you're saying looks right. You want to make sure that the voice matches the lips, it'll look really awkward if it doesn't. One trick that I do if you don't have a professional film slate is that at the very beginning of recording or at the end as well. Clap in front of the camera Section 1.2. So that when you are editing and you see that clap, you'll also see the spike in the audio waveform in most video editors you actually see and you can expand the track on the timeline so that you see the waveform of audio and you can match that up, move it around to match the visual claps. That's how you easily sync, video and audio after you sink your footage. Or if you didn't have to do that, the next step is to pull selects, this is pulling your best shots, your best takes and getting it prepared for putting it together in the edit. What I'll typically do is I'll create a new sequence which is basically a new video, a new timeline. And I'll just start taking the best clips from all of the takes that I've done and put it on there. Or if I have an interview or if I'm recording a class like this, I'll put the entire take the entire recording, Whether it's five minutes or 10 minutes or sometimes I have interviews that are three or four hours. I'll put that all down on a timeline and then I'll just start cutting it up, keeping the bits that I like and deleting the bits that I don't like. Sometimes I'll also duplicate that timeline or that sequence as I go on so that if I have to refer back to what I was doing yesterday or the day before or some of the takes that weren't as good, then I'll have that saved and then my final take or my final sequence will only be the best takes after you've pulled selects. It's time to do the edit. This is moving things around, building your story, making sure that the flow is good, the pacing is good, cutting out the arms and the earth. This is the fun part of editing were really not the fun part that was a little sarcastic, but a lot of people don't like editing. I actually like editing and have fun doing that after you've put together your story with your main footage. The next thing is to add B roll and graphics. So sometimes you might only have B roll and not graphics. Sometimes you might just have graphics and not B roll, but you put together your piece and you add that extra footage to make it even more interesting. So adding titles, if you've created graphics, you can add those or the cutaway footage that adds to your piece. This might also be where if you're shooting something like a narrative film where you're cutting together different takes or different shots and matching it up after that. It's all about tweaking and making it look and sound better. So adjusting audio levels to make sure that dialogue is relatively at the same level throughout. Making sure there's nothing that's too loud or too soft, adding music and making sure that the music isn't too loud, changing up the music so that it adds emotion or drama or excitement or comedy or whatever feeling you want with your video also affecting or adjusting the colors of your video. This is called color correction and that encompasses all kinds of things, but including adjusting the exposure so that it's bright enough or not too dark. Also the white balance so it's not too yellow or too blue or too green or too magenta. You want to have it look natural, make sure that the colors look natural. You can also, and there's another term called color grading, which sometimes people get confused by. It's different than color correction. Color correction is making sure that your video looks good. Normal color grading is giving your video a style through those same techniques, so maybe making it dark or blue to make it look like nighttime or maybe really warm or adding a sepia tone or making it black and white to give it a sort of effect. That's what color grading is and that can really make your video a little bit more interesting as well visually. And once you put that all together, you've tweaked all the things to make it look and sound great, added any effects or titles or anything else you need. It's time to export. Now, I am going to go into some best practices for exporting in the next section. But right now I just want to mention as well, the best setting that I use for exporting my videos for publishing online and that's using a quicktime Kodak. So a Kodak is basically the file type in the, within that Kodak or within the quicktime family is the H 264 Kodak and H 264 is a way that your computer can compress a video file, so that's still high quality. But it's a smaller file size, great for being able to upload online quickly and process great for playback on your computer or just for transferring between your computer and a hard drive. So that's the setting that I use whenever I'm publishing my videos online. So that's sort of a broad overview of what the video editing process looks like. If you have any questions, let me know and we're going to dive into some of those things in the next few lessons to give you some more best practices.

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