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Wedding Photography

Lesson 10 of 31

Shoot: First Look

 

Wedding Photography

Lesson 10 of 31

Shoot: First Look

 

Lesson Info

Shoot: First Look

right now, I'm in p mode. I'm anti is so about 800. And I'm just gonna let this thing do its thing. And I just want to grab this shot and that's it, right? Notice that the light just changed, though. Bomber, Did you see the value of the light on their faces? Just a second ago? It was bright, vibrant. It was beautiful. It was flat lighting, but it was It had a little more contrast to it right now. To me, that's kind of flat. Okay, because this what's my reflector? Anybody? No, that building. Yeah. So if you turn around, I'm always looking for stuff like this. That building now is gonna light her more. That son just hit it. I saw it got brighter. I look over here, they got a little more contrast in their face. So that right there is my reflector. I'm always looking for natural reflectors, and I don't mind. This is a program thing. Now I incorporate the back of that right there because I want to show it's kind of a cool thing and I try not to direct too much. Wow, that's kind of cool. I l...

ike it so that painting is part of this. Watch your composition. What I do now and it's kind of really natural cause I do it quickly. When I looked through the viewfinder, I do my eye does a circular motion in the corners of the viewfinder top bottom because when you're outside even in here, you beware of how you're shooting the the composition that you're using, right? There's times that I see people having twigs come in the back of their heads. Ah, light pole in the background that's not completely out of focus out of the back of the head. Move yourself. Like if I shot this right now, that little cherub up there on the trees, actually coming out of the back of his head. So I moved myself over so that his head is in between the chair of on the tree and that chicken looking thing all the way to the right hand side of this thing. So that's kind of how I see this. I just move it over and I grab that shot. Look at each other. Come on, you love each other. That's the one. All right. So that's what I do when I go to a wedding if I sued Boom, and then I'm gone. It is not a photo shoot for me. Weddings aren't photo shoots. You grab the shot, you're done with it. Think about this for a second. The longer you pose someone to stiffer, they get, you know, unless they're models. And I have shot plenty of models and actresses and actors that are so comfortable in front of the camera that opposing them, you know that's not a problem, right? And even if you have to do it for a long time, but my the way that I work, I need to shoot this really quickly. The quicker the better, because the more that they have to think about what they're doing there. And the more that I move them around, the more uncomfortable they get. Because psychologically, sometimes when people think is, why is he getting it? He's taken so long, what's taken so long? Am I not doing something right because they're not used to this. So here's a thought. I'm gonna do this now. As a matter of fact, can you guys come step out for a second? Right here, Right here is good right here is good. Hi. I'm Joe. John. John. Nice to meet you. Know your husband, your pretend husband, for really love this. We have really husband and wife. This is cool. So imagine. Now, let's just do this because I'm gonna kind of take this away from where we were scheduled to do, which is the first look. They've already seen each other now, but we are gonna do the first look. Um, instead of let's say this was gonna be my portrait, and you normally have your arm around her, right, And this is gonna be a formal shot. And here's what people do. Okay. Now, I want you to turn your body a little bit, and I hate hands and and, you know, maybe hold her hand or put your hand around her waist. Right. Lean into your okay. Very nice. Okay. What if you spend so much tying doing this? But you're really all you're getting is a very traditional portrait. But you want a little bit more emotion. Here's how I do my formals. You ready for this? It's really easy. Simply ask them a question. Okay. All right. You don't have to do that. anymore. But holding hands is good, though. Yeah, All right. So I'm just gonna chat out because I don't know who you are. Just met you, right? Okay. Normally, this goes a lot further because I know my clients through the process of the pitch through the process of the engagement session, which I also almost insist on doing, and not because it's extra money, but because this is an opportunity for me to learn who they are. More importantly, this is an opportunity to them for them to learn who I am. So that by the time I get to this point, their wedding day, they know. Oh, that's Joe. And they open up to me like a book because they know who I am now. But how about I do this? So I want to take this portrait of them, right? So I want you guys to think for a second. I mean, do you guys you love each other, don't you? Okay. Did I just asked him to do that? Did you see what just happened? Uh, they looked at each other. It was a really smile. It had honesty in it. Instead of me saying, Look, at each other now smiled. It's a told different feeling because it's really if I ask you when you can, you tell me the story or think about the story of where and when he proposed to you. What was that like? Yes, we had, um it was at our college. We haven't There's a little chapel that was above the chapel at the college and I had some rose pills going up. She was on spring break, which was kind of fun. And so I was able to kind of create everything, make sure everything was done. I made a little book for that. Have the story of the Prince and the Princess, and it was basically are dating story together. And so we got Teoh. I made it through, which is good. So when he proposed what you feel, what's up? I'm just shocked. My parents said that he could have their blessing. So I was I was really excited to marry this man. That's awesome. Do you see what just happened now? Granted, they had a mic in their hand and all that stuff, but what I usually do is just that I asked him a question So now that you just got married, right? You just literally think about this. You just walk down the altar. I have you here in front of you in a portrait, and I want you to think, How you feeling right now? Yeah. Did you really No kidding. There it is. For me, that's done. So instead of really hanging out so much time trying to create this perfect image again by posing, posing, posing it's a couple questions. How you feeling? I do. That wouldn't my engagement sessions. I might go to the place where he proposed, and maybe they were seated at the table in the same table. I'll try and find it, right. So then I asked him So So tell me what happened. And the minute you ask them a question like that, where did they go? Right here and right here. And they start to remember memories. I'm functioning. I want expressions function. You know, that function from getting it from their heart and their minds and their expressions from that. Right? So that's that's That's the idea. So then it says so what did he do now? She's gonna have to remember. Well, you know I was waiting. I wasn't sure because he looked a little anxious and and finally the waiter came over and oh, my Oh, my gosh. There was a ring in the champagne glass and I didn't. I said, What? What is this? I said. So that's really how did you feel? And click? You're done, you know? I mean, these shots are 12345 You're finished. Your engagement session is done. This set up is done in literally a minute or two because for the sake of education, I'm doing this for a little longer because I'm speaking about it. But normally, if I had them in this doorway like this, it's a couple questions that boom, boom, boom. We're finished. We're onto the next thing, and I've gotten really emotions. You'll see the images. There's some real smiles, because how about it? How would I have done this? All right, I want you two guys looking at each other. All right, I want you to laugh. Come on. I want you to laugh. You married, huh? It's not the same, is it? It's not the same. It's not the same. It's not the same if it if it came from here, which it did in the initial thing. And when you cried, God bless you. No, no. Sorry. No, sorry. It was beautiful. That was real emotion. That's what they'll remember. So when they look back at the images, when they go through the book and they see this Oh, honey, do you remember this? Yes. I remember exactly how I was feeling, or I remember how I was thinking what I was thinking. That's what it's about. That's what the book is about. And so when you get it from here, that's what they will remember and they'll relive it. They'll relive that moment again. Over and over. I often joke with Couples. Look in 10 years and you guys know each other that well, and you need to be reminded of what it was like on Day one. Open up the book. You get into a fight, an argument, you disagree with each other. Open up the book, you know, I mean, it's OK to disagree and all that, but if you really want to connect back to you know, what is this all about now? Because now life has gone and moved on again. You relive it. You relive everything that you said to each other in the vows. I look over the shoulder, and during the ceremony I'll nail the vows that they're holding in their hands so that they remember. I see vows that are written hand written by the bride on the table where she's getting her makeup done in front of the mirror. And it scratched up with pencils outlined this I'll look over it. I'll grab it because, believe it or not, that stuff gets thrown out. But I'll have it. I'll have documented it will be part of their book so that they'll always remember what they said to each other and that they took the time to write it. That's awesome. You guys are great. Click. See, the clicks happened really quickly. Okay, so here, we're gonna set this thing up. It's really easy, right? You're gonna come from out here, not your coming over here. I'm gonna I'm gonna tell you something. Um, if this were a scenario where they were going to see each other beforehand and she wanted the oh, my gosh, moment from him when he turns around, I'm gonna do it this way. I'm gonna find some place. This is not ideal. OK? I picked something like this because while I have the luxury and the fortune to have amazing spaces to work with because people spend a lot of money at the weddings that I do a ton of it. We all started including myself in the beginning, and And I know you got a lot of you are shooting weddings and not the most desirable conditions and locations. Okay, so I'm gonna give you one. There's these green umbrellas, you know? I'm gonna work my way around it. I'm gonna cheat the camera, so I don't see those umbrella. I'm gonna just get this stuff right here, and I'm gonna position him out here. Come on. I want you about right here like this, right? Yeah. Yeah. Class three hands behind your back. So I'm going to go play with the camera. Thank you, sir. Thank you, sir. And what I would do first just to set this up, I want him sitting there for a while. I want him to think about it, cause what I've told him is any minute now, you're gonna turn around when I tell you to To see your bright to be for the very first time. Okay, now he's already known. Based on what she said about the dress, he's not seen it most of the time, and she's just explained that the dress is really beautiful. You're gonna be really surprised. So he's already been prompted that this is gonna be Oh, my God. Moment. Okay, so the first thing I would want to do is actually I shoot him like that because his hands are naturally class behind his back. I didn't tell him to do that, but that's where he's that. So I would probably shoot this first and what I'm gonna do. Remember I said that I can actually grab these shots and change the f stop and do all that stuff I'm shooting instead. 2.8. Okay, that's all I'm doing right now. I just wanted us right now. I did it in program mode and in program mode. Right now, it's saying F 5 4/100 of a second. But I didn't want that ST to be too obvious or the wall and the tree. And I positioned him so that the trees not directly in front of his head. What's looking like? It's gonna come out of his head. So I put myself here, cut out the videographer. Well, and then I turned around and I see her. So that's my first shot. I want him standing there. She's patiently waiting. Sorry for that. You can look around at him cause this is Look at him here. There you go. That's very nice. So here's what's gonna happen. I'm gonna have you walk in a second, right to the edge right here. I'm gonna have I'm gonna shoot over his shoulder looking at you. So I want you to peek around the thing and then walk towards him right and stop right here. Stop right here. Right. And I'll get him to turn around. So then I've already discussed it with her. What I where I want her to stop and walk and freeze. I'm gonna talk to him now. We're good. Okay. In a second, she's gonna come from back and only I wait till you see what she looks like. Dude, she's awesome. All right. Um and then I'm gonna ask you to turn around to your left. I'm gonna run back over. Tow her side. Right. And then you're gonna turn around and see her for the first time. And then however you're feeling in here, let it out. It's all good. So I'm gonna grab a couple shots of you, and you had your hands class behind your back. So I see light that's on your face right now. And I need you to kind of step back. Just a hair and out of the light. Uh, move that way a bit, right? You want to pick Adam? Yeah. That's what I want. Yeah. You're what? You anxious to see her or something? Not yet. You're getting good right there. So when I tell you to turn around, I want you to turn around, okay? And you'll turn to your left. So you stay right there. Move to your right a little bit, love. Yes. Good. Right there. Right there. Right there. I like this. All right. Are you ready to see her? She's looking pretty awesome. Go for it. Yeah. All right. The mike, my cameras busy but grabbed those shots. Grabbed those shots. That's pretty much what I do to getting ready stuff. Now. I usually extended a little further. I make it last a little longer. Sometimes his family is in front of him like you saw in the slideshow or her family's behind. Typically, it's a private moment for the two of them, so that's kind of what I do. It's Ah, turn around and grab these moments without saying anything else other than they can walk towards each other and then they'll kiss those all quickly, quick instead of saying Now dip her. Now do this. No, no, no, Don't do any of that. They naturally will do this. You won't have to say a word. See, The thing is, is that couples, brides, grooms, they all do things naturally. If you stay aware and stay in the moments with them, they will do things without you having to say a thing. How many photographers do I hear when the bride has just gotten a dress on and the bouquet is down? And she's looking in the mirror? Right? And the photographer goes, Can you look over your right hand shoulder and and fluff? You dress a little bit, you know, pick up the veil or pick up the dress and fix it a little bit and they grabbed these shots. What do you think of Bright does in front of a mirror? They look at herself. And what does she do? Adjust. Crimps fixes herself. I see this every wedding. They do it naturally. You have to know, having had the experience of being at a few weddings, that this is what happens when the bride get dressed. She will always look in the mirror. She will always put on lips. You will always fix her hair and make sure that the veil looks proper. She will always with 100% of the time looked down over her right shoulder at her dress. Pick it up, fluff a drop it and look in the mirror. I don't have to say anything. They do that right? Yeah. So pretty much as much. Hands off a Seiken Get away with. And yes, there are times I have to direct. I told you yesterday that I'm a mixed bag. There are times why prompt a moment. There are times where I even create the moment. This is kind of like creatives. This PJ what I just said it did. It's not photojournalism. I set it up. But when he turns around and sees her for the first time, is that a set of real feeling? Absolutely. Absolutely. I love it. And as you Yes, please. Um, I just I like the way that you did that on your own, because typically, sometimes I work by myself. Um, So how you shot him this way and her coming in and waited for him to turn around. But do you sometimes set up, um, with your second shooter? This and you don't? So she knows where you're going to be, and vice versa. Here's what happens with my primary shooter. Um, is I have this. This is my my gig right here, over her shoulder, over his shoulder, seeing his expressions, seeing hers. When I first grabbed the one portrait of him and then zoom in on her though, that that's my stuff right now, my primary shooter will be right here, right here, doing a wide catching the sides of her peeking around the corner and him that way. Okay, Now, we're not in an ideal situation here because we gotta offensive picket fence. We got all that stuff, but yeah, mice primaries out of sight in terms of where I'm standing and where I'm looking. And he's usually shooting from the side. Are there for the chat room. Any questions right now based on what I just did? Let's see. Just curious. There are lots of questions. Let me just pull one going quick, come out from publishes here. Um, leaves of grass photography is wondering. It seems like you're quite involved in the first look, wouldn't it be better to just leave this moment happen and leave the bride and groom more to themselves? Since this? Since this is an intimate moment. Um, but how do you? Yes, but how do you suggest most brides and grooms in my experience, say, What do you want us to do? How does this first look gonna happen? So in other words, it's hard to leave it to their vices because they have no idea what what what the first look is supposed to be like. Of course, the best first look is when the bride walks down the aisle and the groom's already at the altar. Right? So in this case, I have to set it up and part of the setting up of the groom is also toe. Let him stew in whatever feelings already churning in him and egging on a little bit so that I get him to express it a little more. Most not most. I say. Quite a few grooms would be reserved about showing emotion, especially if you let them do their own thing and you'll turn around. That's a nice dress, honey. And yeah, and you know there is. There is the bright and then there's more, right? Ah, but no, that's because he has no clue what to say or what to do in front of the cameras. So if I directed a little and by that I mean, if I set it up and I put little bugs in his ear like way too, you see her? Oh my God, I'm just prepping him psychologically to turn around, to expect something amazing. And usually if not always they react that way. They they will just come out and just go. Oh, my God, honey. I mean, you saw the one with LeAnn Rimes. I mean, most of them, and even man Mondano and Peter the groom turns around and they weep. There's just so much, so much emotion because it's been churning. I let him sit and stew on it for a while, then, you know, if the parents are around to see, then they also will, you know, mirror to him what they're seeing and what the bride looks like before he can turn around. So that adds, Yeah, that adds, Just keep building over and over again. Pretty much really cool question from Beth Olson. Creative. How does Joe get that genuine smiles and laughter when shooting groups groups humor a lot of its humor. So when I do, my formal is the first thing I say. OK, all this, uh, GQ shoot. I might even do this for Vogue. But when I say that, I'm already ready to shoot, so they laugh when I say that you are. I do this because who's doing the formals? My primary shooter, right? So I'm the guy that might step in once in a while and saying, Have my camera and I go All right, um, I'll take a couple shots, too, so I'll grab a couple shots. I gotta change my card. Hold on one second and I put the camera down. You know what talk amongst yourselves. And so what do they do? They start talking, laughing, making jokes. I picked up the camera cause I don't have to change cards. The car is still good man. Click, click, click, click, click. And then they go on, Man, that's cheating. Yeah. Click, click, click, Click. Like so it's humor. It's taken him off guard. It's also making sure that they don't feel like they're in a photo shoot. That this is really relaxed. So sometimes I interrupt my primary shooter and I totally undo them. So it's great that it's like a pyramid. They look wonderful. But then I said, OK, you guys need to chill for a second. Okay? I need the groomsmen toe unbutton their jackets sticking hand in a pocket, lean on a shoulder. That's what I want, Girls, take those bouquets. Hang him down. Human, give me some attitude. All right, one. Do one of these for me. Lean against your partner over on this side. I just get them to relax. I said, All right. Now we're like the cover of vogue and laughter. Click. There you go. Cool A question from Seal Array Regarding the first look. Do you ever work with videographers in the first look. And if so, do you say you can have this area right here? I'm gonna be here like this. It's always great with video beforehand, toe work out where everybody stands. So I do do that. I'm definitely involved with video being on on the premises and around the shooting location and figuring out where we all stand. So we're not in each other shots. They don't want me in, There's and I don't want them in mind if we can avoid it Now, this is a tight little place. I had video over there grabbing us from over there, but I was able to cheat over and cut him out, and I don't think he could do that with me. Although I think the intention was to get me right. I think he had to get me okay. S Oh, yeah. I always work with video. Okay. Police says hi, Joe, for the first look. Do you prefer to have the family around for this or not? Does that matter to you? It doesn't. I asked the couple that because what happens a lot of times is that the bride will say this is a private moment and it's just for he and I. Absolutely others say, Oh, no, no. I want my dad to be there, you know? So it's all dependent on the bride and groom, and I always asked them, I will always ask them What would you prefer? Private? Just the two of you want the bridal party, which usually maid of honor, is my best friend, or is my sister or family, or do you want just alone? Sarah from Buenos Aires is wondering if you are bracketing your exposure. She here, she says. I hear three shutter clicks almost every time he shoots. That's how I shoot what I've learned. And it's not bracketing. It's not bracketing. I hit it three times. I try to, um, Here's why I do this. This is something that's kind of been I've done it to myself when I'm on the dance floor or if I'm in the church and I'm using a long lens and I do my whole, you know, elbow on my hip or in my camera, hold it and I hear or I see in the viewfinder that the light that I have is 1/4 of a second at 2.8. I take a deep breath, let half of it out, fire three times Bam, bam, bam! Because what I tend to do is try and time it between my heartbeats, or at least to where there's no interference. I have found in my experience, my experience only I can't totally vouch for everybody else and being able to do this, that in those three frames one will be sharp to will be out of focus. And so it's bracketing in the sense that not about the light but about the steadiness of it. So even out here is that really necessary? But what I'm also expecting is I wanna nail, make sure his eyes aren't shut. Said there might be one or two or Great. Okay, twin pair or twin pearl photography says, What do you ask when you've exhausted the What are you feeling? Aren't you happy to be married? Type questions? But But I'm done. I don't I don't need any more questions. That little scenario is it for me. If I'm going to do a formal with them and I want genuine emotion, I've got 123 questions. I'm finished. I am absolutely finished with that Now. Now I'm saying there's also formals. So now my primary shooter or me will take them somewhere and do something really pretty. Hold hands, look at each other, also very short lived. But what I was trying to show you here is I want genuine emotion. So there's nothing nicer than to see in your wedding book you and your husband coming out, holding hands and laughing from within. And so I want access that instead of trying to ask for that, there's there's a big difference between asking for it. Can you laugh now or accessing it by saying, How do you feel right now? Chat Room is wondering if you could set up this shop just really quickly, Um, how you would work it if the father was in the scene. And if you could use maybe one of the students as our father waken do that. So his mother, hers or his volunteer, uh, whose father wouldn't be his or hers. Uh, they just say demonstrated first, look with the father. Okay, so if I had to do it this way and she's around here Dad will be over there if you were there. Come on, Dad. I like it. I like it a lot. And I say keep the cool on. Yeah, so you know now. And you're good here for a second, but you're facing her. You're looking over his shoulder and your clasping your hands behind your back like you were. Remember, I have myself in the primary shooter, so I'm either gonna be on her when she steps out. So initially, she's around the corner, right? I'm either going to be on her or on him, and my primary shooter will be on the opposite in. So let's say that the primary shooter is already going to get this shot as she's coming out, or is over the shoulder of Dad from a far off the corner to get her peaking. Okay. And the minute she steps out, who's response? Am I gonna be looking for Dad's dad's? So I'm on him and I say, step out, love. Step out and he's gonna go off. There you go. And I'm done there. Yeah, I like that. I like that. I'm gonna hire you as the father for all my weddings. I don't care, your dear, the father, That's it. That was awesome. But do you understand? So that's nailed my primary shooters over the groom's shoulder, having the groom in part of the photo, out of focus and then nailing the bride's expression. Coming out seeing dad Because what's gonna happen to Bride? When she sees Father, she may cry. He may cry. So both of those air taking from both ends like that simultaneously. Okay, so Dad's now done. He's seen his daughter. He's now saying, What is the groom doing right now? He's looking at Dad's response. If Dad's now crying or he's gotten the glasses often is going. The groom already knows what that brides gonna look like. He's now churning even more so. I love this. This is why usually I will put the family in front of him, her family behind right here, seeing her coming out first. I will do that first because he's going to hear them say something about their daughter. Oh my God, honey, you look beautiful. Wow, that dress is crazy! She churns. She gets the smile with the middle, choked up tears as well. Click, click, click, click. He's churning like crazy Dad now responds, goes completely nuts. So there's stuff that you can do that helps this It's harder to do alone. That's why I have to direct more. Go ahead. Okay on MEMC asked. How do you deal with cultural weddings that don't allow much of private moments when families act as a coordinator? Things could get out of control. How do you tackle that? I'm Orlando. Yeah. Um, I've never really had an issue because again, remember, when I do my pitch, it's based on the, You know, they hired me based on me and the image that they've seen. So if they've already seen that, they will say, Well, that won't happen in my family Then they won't expect it. So I am. Here's what I do and I want you to think about this when I'm at the contract level with the clients, we talk about how many guests I have. A timeline from the coordinator. How many guests will there be? Tell me your preferences. Are you going to see each other beforehand? Is Derek Atouba signing whatever might be? I make notes on my contracts. That contract comes with me to the gig I make notes at the gig if something falls out of line like they were supposed to be a five o'clock first look and it didn't happen till 6 30 there was no light. I make a note instead of five. It was 6 30 the first look and it was dark. I had to use flash on camera because if I get months later the bright saying What happened? My first look is like horrid. I I don't like the light and used used flash. Well, I go back to the contract, I have my notes. You remember that I suggested to you that we needed Teoh. You know, either do it somewhere else or that we're losing available light. It's just remind me because after doing wedding, wedding, wedding, wedding and then months later, eight months, nine months later you get this feedback and that happened me in the past where something changed and the bride got sick and she was in her room and didn't do coming down. And the grand entrance that was in part. And she was upset that there was no grand entrance photos. How come there's no Do you remember honey cause I made notes. I asked your father and your father said you were sick in your room and you were in that room for two hours. She was pregnant and she was having morning sickness. So I have to remind him. Oh, yeah, so if I don't write these things down is it's important. So when you have a client is that that's not gonna happen? You know, my family very strict Chinese weddings, air much like that right there. Very. And there, you know, it's introspective for their their people that really aren't outwardly showing emotion. They just don't do that. Having said that, I've seen plenty of Chinese weddings where the bride cries and the father looks down because he can't take it. And he's crying. So And while it seems like it's a private thing, the way that I shoot it with a long lens, I'm not in their face and I'll let them know that that this is how I shoot and I will show them cultural weddings, where culturally speaking, this is not the norm. However, I'm still able to capture it, and they let me when the client knows you, to the extent that they know me because of the interactions I've had with them and by the fact that they feel comfortable with me when it comes time to the wedding. What do you think happens? Because they know who Joe is and why he's there because he loves this so much. They become open books. They let me in. I am not that brilliant at capturing moments. I'm gonna say it again. It's not about me. It is about having permission from them to see that. So it's there beautiful way of letting me in because of who I am. And I have allowed them to get to know me by virtue of sitting in front of me engagement session, coming to the prince afterwards, talking about the images. I interact with my clients before the wedding 45 times. So I do that on purpose. I want them to know who I am so that when I show up on the day of the wedding, I'm just not a paid vendor. I'm Joe. I'm your friend. I'm here to document everything that happens, and you're gonna trust me, and they do. And that's when they open up. That was a long winded explanation. Go ahead. Is anything else? Yes, Dana in Messina. Mason. How much time do you set aside for the first? Look, um, you know, I think first looks about 15 minutes. 10 15 minutes. Yeah, it's not long. Everything that I do formals no more than 15 minutes. You know, you have a handful of must half its immediate family stuff. You know, it's bride and groom alone bribing room with parents, bride and groom with bridal party. Ah, bride and groom with grandparent's and parent's. You know, in siblings that that that's pretty much it. It's like 56 set up shots. Then we're done. If they request mawr, you know, the and sometimes they do extended family, I might suggest him. You know what? Um, if this is before cocktails and cocktails, they're going on, maybe we could do that afterwards, because again, what I want them to do is interact with everybody that's at the wedding. And if they're in cocktails and having a good time and I'm taking care of shooting them right now, after after the ceremony, it's You can't spend that much time. So that's why beforehand done so this first look what happens now? I do the portrait of them really quickly. And then the next step is family within 10 15 minutes or here if they already aren't here. Bridal party will be coming down now. And so now we knock out all the formals right here. That's my typical wedding. Not always. A lot of times, it's not till afterwards and on the altar in the church. Okay, I do those as well. But the majority of my weddings, I knock it out right here. Right now. 15 minutes. So you got a 10 minute first glance 15 minutes of 15 minutes. Shoot with the It's 1/2 hour altogether. We're done.

Class Description

Joe Buissink is coming to creativeLIVE! Joe will show you his award-winning photojournalistic approach to weddings. He'll teach you how to find your own style and bring your own personality out in your images, because the most important thing about photography is who YOU are! Your clients want you for your passion, and Joe will help to bring out the artist in you. Joe will also get into the technical aspects of his business, talking about how he designs his contracts, packages, and prices, and why he designs them that way. Joe is an internationally sought-after wedding photographer who has shot weddings for celebrities including Jennifer Lopez, Jessica Simpson & Nick Lachey, Christina Aguilera, Katharine McPhee, and others, and now on creativeLIVE he'll share the passion, knowledge and skill that makes him such a success!

Reviews

Carlos Zaldivar
 

Joe, This is a amazing course so much information. I am a wedding photographer that loves your ways. Your self and Dennis Reggie are my favorite photographers. This course is the best. Thank you for sharing all of your great information. God bless you for being such a great person hope some day to meet you so that I can thank you for everything. I look up to you every day and have also read your book wedding photography from the heart. Your a great inspiration to me which makes me love being a wedding photographer from the heart. Thanks again for everything you share. Carlos Zaldivar, New Jersey Carlos Zaldivar Photographers- www.carlos-zaldivar.com

a Creativelive Student
 

I feel like this course with Joe Buissink is a basket of gems. Several times already I have been tearing up, because Joe is validating each one of us, as artists and professionals. Being ourselves, selling the experience, and knowing what we offer artistically IS enough. Of course we have to do the work, know our craft, and have good business sense...But what has been the most valueable to me is the sense of joy that happens when Joe says something that I have felt myself, him sharing so much with us makes reaching our goals real, because he has been there.... when he said he pitched in Dunkin Donuts and still made it an experience..I cried, I have done that myself. (And booked the client:) I remember wishing I had a studio at the time, but now I think..one day I will! To hear him say he tears up at clients weddings...I do that, and felt so silly, but now I feel proud! This is a morale boost...a shot of joy in my arm. Thank you Joe Buissink for offering up your help and advise and for being so willing to share yourself with us. You are inspiring so many...and Thank you CreativeLIVE!! To anyone who is not sure if they want to purchase this workshop...DO IT!!! It is a gem.

VILANIA
 

I always feel so grateful to have Creative Live in my life, which, in turn, has given me the opportunity to have this wonderful source of information, Joe is one of them, he made find myself as a person when it comes to dealing with yourself and with the client, he vibrates in every thing that he does, every step from beginning to the end, that is the essence, put your passion in everything you do, we love what we do, It was so touching when he said that he tears up with moments of their clients in their weddings, I do too and I thought it was wrong, show our sensitivity it only proves us that we are human, and we can break barriers created by wrong schemas letting us be who we really are and then we can be free to feel and create, and do what we like to do, thanks JOE, thank you also for all the technical information, is PRICELESS. Your course it was my Birthday present that I give to myself, and I have not regret, thank you.