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Tabletop Product Photography

with Don Giannatti

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  •   Trailer

  •   01 Class Introduction

    25:09
  •   07 Why Tabletop Photography?

    30:36

Class duration: 16h 44m

See all 38 lessons
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    26 student reviews

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About The Class

basic product photography.

Don Giannatti returns for a special workshop on tabletop product photography. Don starts with an introduction to tabletop lighting - tools, scrims, DIY gear - and how to organize your shoot around a tabletop to bring everyone up to speed. Then Don will teach you the basic concepts of Tabletop Product Photography. Finally Don will ramp up to more advanced topics adding extras such as kicker lights, snoots, and grids that can bring your work up a notch.


Topics Covered


Lesson Plan

  1. 01

    Class Introduction

    Learn the basics of lighting objects to photograph on a tabletop so you can shoot product photography.

    25:09
  2. 02

    Basic Tabletop Photography

    17:55
  3. 03

    Basic Tabletop Q&A

    27:08
  4. 04

    More Basic Tabletop Photography

    10:42
  5. 05

    Lighting Setups and Implementation

    26:47
  6. 06

    Building Simple Tools

    27:41
  7. 07

    Why Tabletop Photography?

    30:36
  8. 08

    Product vs. Still Life

    27:28
  9. 09

    Product vs. Still Life Q&A

    21:48
  10. 10

    Basic Tabletop Setup and Gear

    14:38
  11. 11

    Setup and Gear Q&A

    19:44
  12. 12

    Lighting Considerations

    25:21
  13. 13

    General Q&A

    28:43
  14. 14

    Shoot: Wine Bottles

    49:37
  15. 15

    Shoot: Jewelry Part I

    23:16
  16. 16

    Shoot: Jewelry Part II

    34:37
  17. 17

    Q&A and Business

    19:05
  18. 18

    Shooting for Dimension

    22:28
  19. 19

    Shooting for Dimension Q&A

    14:13
  20. 20

    The Challenge of Shiny Surfaces

    29:07
  21. 21

    Working with a Variety of Surfaces

    14:33
  22. 22

    Shoot: Make-up and Brushes

    35:17
  23. 23

    Shooting to a Layout

    37:41
  24. 24

    Student Shoots, Part I

    53:09
  25. 25

    Student Shoots, Part II

    31:13
  26. 26

    Fixing a Missing Pearl in Photoshop

    18:39
  27. 27

    The Value of Your Work

    41:30
  28. 28

    Product and Still Life: The Modern Challenge

    26:54
  29. 29

    Still Life Demo (Shoes)

    08:32
  30. 30

    Bidding and Pricing Q&A

    31:17
  31. 31

    A Sensible Approach to Gear

    12:18
  32. 32

    Shoot: Guitar with Multiple Light Layers

    17:41
  33. 33

    Guitar: Compositing Lights in Photoshop

    30:06
  34. 34

    Drop and Pop

    12:40
  35. 35

    Special Shoot: Motorcycle

    59:53
  36. 36

    Q&A and Relief Cut Shoot

    10:14
  37. 37

    Creating Your Product Photography Business, Part I

    40:09
  38. 38

    Creating Your Product Photography Business, Part II

    27:08

Meet Your Expert

Don Giannatti

Don Giannatti has been a commercial photographer and graphic designer for over 40 years. Starting out with photography as a hobby, he eventually had studios in LA, Chicago and NY. Specializing in people and still life, Don added design to ... read more

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Bonus Material

Access your course materials here!

Get access to exclusive bonus content when you purchase this class.

  • pdf ProductPhotographyWorkbook.pdf
  • pdf The Business Side.pdf
  • pdf Basics of Subject Centric Light.pdf
  • pdf Simple Tabletop Tools.pdf
  • pdf Introduction to Tabletop Photography.pdf
  • pdf Product vs Still Life.pdf
  • pdf Introduction to Tabletop Lighting.pdf
  • pdf The Challenge of Shiny Objects.pdf
  • pdf A Sensible Approach to Gear.pdf

96% of students recommend this class.
See what some of them have to say.

  • mc

    December 2016

    THere are some courses in CL i think of as not covering a to z but covering -z to z. THis is one of those courses. The value proposition is over the top. The instricutor: Don Giannatti is so experienced he's a relaxed in his knowledge and practiced in cutting to the chase to provide answers to really good questions about set ups for product photos (vs. art/ still-life). The topics: complete workflow from first principles in order to understand what we're trying to achieve with table top work, Don Giannatti makes it clear that we're using light deliberately to give shape to an object. Example insight: using a white card (or black) reflector is not the same as using a silver/gold reflector. The latter create a new light source; the former shape the light that's there. Can imagine the arguments but the demo brings the points home. Or how about NOT using umbrellas for product shots. Or for "drop and pop" product shots, how to do that without umbrellas and tents "that's 50 dollars a shot right there" says Giannatti. Example tool demo: one of the joys of this course is that such an expert does most of the class using readily makable tools like scrims from shower curtains and baking paper. The specialist tools like a modifier on a flash is well within the range of an aspiring commerial table top photographer. And Meaningful Demos LIGHTING/composition what are some of the most challenging and compelling things to shoot when building a portfolio/photographic experience? Can you shoot shiny stuff - like bottles and jewlery. PHOTOSHOP making photoshop unpretencious and accessible, Giannatti presents examples of how to fix bits of a shot, as well as - and this one is worth the price of admission - how to put together a composite of a guitar product shot if you only have one limited sized light to light the whole thing. We also see where highlights can be added - and how. Some basic knowledge of Photoshop layering, masking and brushes would be good to have, but one can work back from seeing it applied into those basic skills. BUSINESS We start with light giving shape to objects as a demonstrable principle, move into how to use light structurally for bringing out something fantastic about that product - that as Giannatti points out - puts bread on someone's table, so respect. From these demos we go from light and camera to post to produce the finished image. Now what? or how have a product that needs shooting? That's the business of product photography. In these excellent sections on Business, Giannatti details the heuristics of hard graft to get gigs: where to look for contacts, frequency of approach, engaging with social media (you don't have to, he says, but effectively, it's gonna cost ya). "Doing just these few things you're already way ahead of your competition." I can believe it: they are many of them tedious, but can also well believe they are what pay off. COURSE BONUSES JUST FOR SIGNING UP - for those who subscribed to a live broadcast, all the slides were provided in advance (you can see this offer on class materials) Now that's classy. What other CL courses have done that: given something to participants who just show an interest to sign up? (It's that gift thing kevin kubota talks about in his workshop on photography business - makes one want to work with that person: pay them for the value they create, eh?) TRUST/VALUE Instructor Personality Throughout each part what's delightful is just the EXPERIENCE of this instructor. He's put together a thoughtful course from light to lighting to parts to gear to post to business. There's immediate trust: plainly this man has made a living from what he's talking about, and has addressed almost any immaginable scenario. There's a great demo towards the end of the course of working with students to take shots. The value to folks watching is to see how he helps us all think about how to problem solve (the mantra for the course) to find the shot - to use light card after lightcard to wrap the light to bring out the countours of the material. Even when he says "that's just not working" - there's not a sense of the people shooting having failed - but an opportunity to think about what's been learned - to keep working the problem. There's a whole lot of HOW in that interaction that is highly valuable. Thanks to the participants in the workshop to be so willing too to do that work. This is the kind of course you leave feeling like ok, i can do this - or at least i have the tools and some knowhow now about them to start to work these problems, to start to create value in these kinds of shots. I am already just from being here a better photographer now. Related CL Course: This course feels like a terrific complement to Andrew Scrivani's Food Photography. And no wonder: both take place in small areas and use light in similar ways. A contrast is that in editorial food photography - scrivani's domain - there's a focus on skills to work with what's there; in table top/product, one can enhane - knowing how to do that effectively/believably is where the skills - learning to see that - come in for this kind of work in partiular . If tabletop/product photography is a space you wish to explore, or you just want to be able to practice working with light in the small, and see how to bring you will be delighted with this -z to z deep dive introduction.

  • Creativelive Student

    August 2014

    By chance I stumbled accross Don Giannattis’s Website and his creativeLIVE selection of videos. I was impressed by the material presented and decided to purchase the course for adopting some of his methods and concepts of light control in table top photography. The course covers a wide field, from building your own lighting tools to guidelines for getting in the product photography business. Emphasis is put on understanding light control related to the specifics of the object, discussing the how and why of the creative process. Insistence and patience were demonstrated to be prerequisites for achieving the desired quality of the pictures. I liked to follow the course, because Don Giannattis’s makes an excellent instructor. He has a clear concept, a wonderful sense of humor, and he is very flexible when listening and responding to questions of participants. I really liked this course and recommend it to all beginners in table top photography. William

  • Creativelive Student

    July 2012

    What an amazing workshop. Don holds nothing back, taking us from start to finish in a manner that will allow anyone doing this workshop (and I mean DOING) to go out and do product photography. What's more, Don is not pushing a bunch of expensive gear as the key to making good photos - he makes it accessible to those starting out with a low budget. I could feel Don's good-will toward beginning photographers in the way he conducted this workshop and that is deeply appreciated. It makes him a good teacher. I bought this course and his Lighting Essentials workshop and consider myself lucky to have the opportunity to learn from him.

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