Most business-savvy creatives are active on Pinterest, Facebook and Twitter, but these sites aren’t the best for facilitating connections between designers and potential clients. If you are looking to find more work as a freelancer or get hired full time at an agency, it might be time to consider Adobe’s Behance to promote yourself. If you’re unfamiliar with this cloud based platform, Behance is an online platform where creatives can showcase their work, and where companies can window shop for talent.

CreativeLive instructor and Adobe Creative Cloud whizz, Lesa Snider, explains that unlike other social media sites, Behance streamlines the way businesses go about finding creative talent. For example, a photographer can set up a Behance portfolio that clients can directly subscribe to and comment on, which is easier than a client having to find the photographer’s website, send out an email, and create unnecessary steps in the hiring process.

Behance is also a great way to get feedback and critiques from colleagues, but what makes the social networking site truly unique is that it’s multi-media friendly. Not only can photographers upload still images, musicians can upload audio files, filmmakers can showcase their reels, and designers can display their logos –– all on one easy-to-use platform that boasts more than a million members! Behance also lets users have complete control over their audience –– which means you can decide exactly who sees your portfolio, and who you want to collaborate with.

Like Facebook or Google+, your Behance profile will feature a username and a snazzy profile picture, but it also gives users the opportunity to upload a professional bio and web references. Behance also allows you to link other easily to other social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+, so your work gets comprehensive exposure with the amazing portfolio-building tools at Behance acting as a conduit.

For more on Behance everything else available in Adobe Creative Cloud, check out Lesa’s course.