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Common Copywriting Mistakes (And What to do Instead!)

Lesson 12 from: E-Commerce Copywriting: The Key to Conversion

Carrie French

Common Copywriting Mistakes (And What to do Instead!)

Lesson 12 from: E-Commerce Copywriting: The Key to Conversion

Carrie French

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Lesson Info

12. Common Copywriting Mistakes (And What to do Instead!)

Lesson Info

Common Copywriting Mistakes (And What to do Instead!)

after seven years. I can honestly say that. Thousands, yes. Thousands of brands have hired me to rewrite the terrible copy that they have purchased from other unskilled writers. In some cases, clients actually reached out to me for a quote, decided to hire a different, cheaper option and then ended up coming back to me because they were so disappointed with what was delivered by someone else beyond basic grammar errors and fundamental writing problems. There are three common copyrighting mistakes that really drive clients crazy. So let's go through them. These are the three most problematic issues that I'm consistently asked to rewrite and here's what you should do instead. Problem number one, it's just too aggressive and cliche people don't buy just because you tell them to add to cart. Now sales copy feels really in genuine if the description focuses on pain points to aggressively. Like do you hate when this happens this product solves that. We've all seen that script 100 times or mo...

re. It's old. Instead, the reader should feel compelled to purchase because of three things. Number one, you completely answered their questions and concerns. Number two, you taught them something new and impressive about the product. Number three, you highlighted a benefit function or design feature that they were already curious about. Now they're not just interested. They're impressed. Problem. Number two, it's too fluffy and repetitive, fluffy riding is my pet peeve and I really don't think that I'm alone. This is not the place to define your customers problems or go into a long emotion driven description of the reader that is unrelated to this specific product also, no matter how impressive the USP is. That single fact alone is not enough to write a full description about. If you don't have enough facts to ground the content, it will be too fluffy or essentially the customer won't feel like it's worth their time to read it. My general rule Is that words needs 5-10 facts. 100 words needs about 10 to 15 facts And 150 words needs 15 to 20 facts. Depending on the type of product. You can source these facts in different ways. For example, for a garment description, you could visually describe it and identify the details about construction fabric and print simply by looking at images of the design. In that case, all you might need is a simple photo set. However, a description that only focuses on the visual factors will likely be fluffy. The reader will think why did I bother reading list? I could have just looked the picture. If it's purely observational, it doesn't add any deeper value or expert insight and it likely won't hit other targets from that fact hierarchy, like benefit, quality, design, credibility, usage or value. For example, with a garment description, you'll need deeper thought about the end user and its application. So a benefit could be that it's easy to style and that it's perfect to wear for work quality could be the fact that it's finished by hand or that it's made with natural dyes. Those factors go beyond just what's visible and that's the key problem, number three, it's too aloof. Talking about the product is only half of it. You also need to tie the facts directly to the end user before making a purchase. The customer thinks so what's in it. For me, shopping is a trade, so you need to speak to them directly. Use personal language like you and your not just the create a descriptive scene so that the reader imagines himself using wearing, giving or just enjoying the product right with immersive sensory language that feels genuine and believable. That's the most effective way to make online shopping feel more like a real world sensory experience where they can touch measure and truly understand what they're looking at for the final riding exercise on that practice sheet that we looked at before. You will completely rewrite the sample text, eliminate those common copyrighting errors and write a compelling new version. I've done the first example for you. This simple text really only centers around one design detail which is a visual feature. It doesn't actually describe anything that you can't know just by looking at an image. You can also tell that it's really, really repetitive. It says nothing brings the room together, like patchwork decorate with a blast from the past. Your retro inspired interior design will look great with a stylish door to match this interior door looks super cool with a mix and match patchwork style that combines different wood grains. You'll love how the interlocking pattern looks up close and from a distance the wooden patchwork door really stands out like nothing that you have ever seen before. My rewrite adds a lot more essential information which I made up in this case because I'm not providing you with a real full brief. Yes, the patchwork grain design is still an essential feature of the door but it needs to be fully supported by deeper descriptive elements. So I wrote name interior doors are perfect for vibrant homes and busy offices. The eye catching door is incredibly sturdy and it could be finished in either gray or bleached oak. Our patchwork style design looks cohesive with seamless construction and vivid wood grains. This 3.5 inch door is guaranteed to fit all standard american openings and it's equipped with security that you can count on. So I'll talk through the process for your next to rewrite examples and then you can pause the video at the end of this chapter to practice your new skills for your first practice round, I would like you to craft a description that doesn't fall into this aggressive ultra sales tone and cliche format. So if you are tasked with rewriting the following, do you hate taking your diabetes medication, glucose spikes can make you feel terrible. It can be really difficult to control your sugar intake. So why bother now you don't have to this amazing revolutionary supplement will transform your life and make finger pricks a thing of the past reset your system with the power of pure cinnamon and bitter melon. Stop wasting your days feeling like a slave to insulin. You deserve better click add to cart now. So this might possibly work for a really pushy short term ad funnel page. But again, as I mentioned before, the goal of an e commerce product description is to be a static part of the brand's long term marketing strategy and to achieve that it should boost credibility and target those two primary audiences that I explained in less than one for the best conversion rates. You want to answer the question that is stopping audience A from purchasing and you want to reinforce audience B's interests with supporting information, remember understanding turns into wanting, then finally rewrite this last description to make it feel personal right now. It's super aloof and it seriously lacks emotion which makes it feel awkwardly sterile and unrelated to real life. Especially considering how personal and intimate this particular product is. It currently says the name nursing slash pumping bra comes with an attachable hands free breast massage system when used in conjunction with an electric breast pump. Name significantly improves the quality efficiency and volume of milk expression, mothers can personalize the session by modifying various settings, pressure and speed options, mimic hand massage. This system significantly cuts down on pumping time requirements. All right now, you're free to rewrite when you're finished with my two examples, you can create your own props honestly, there is so much poorly written sales content available online, so it will be easy to find more material to rewrite and practice on. Yeah, probably a little too easy. After finishing this course and working through my exercises, you will have the confidence to identify these common mistakes and fix them yourself.

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