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Match the Perfect Brand Voice

Lesson 11 from: E-Commerce Copywriting: The Key to Conversion

Carrie French

Match the Perfect Brand Voice

Lesson 11 from: E-Commerce Copywriting: The Key to Conversion

Carrie French

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Lesson Info

11. Match the Perfect Brand Voice

Lesson Info

Match the Perfect Brand Voice

in this lesson, you'll learn how sales copy can play a supportive role in connecting the product itself to the brand as a whole. Visual design. Product choice and sales content all work together to create a cohesive, credible sales approach that feels believable and convincing. So even if a brand is trying to sell something that doesn't quite match the rest of their catalog, clever copy can pick up the slack. The unique selling point or USP is a great place to start. Ask yourself what is the main benefit or special feature. Let's refer back to the description, fact hierarchy that I outlined before. What is the primary reason that buyers want to purchase this product or connect with the brand benefit, what it does quality, how it's made design, that's what it looks like credibility, why it's trustworthy utility, how it works and value, why you need it. Whatever primary category you choose to lock into the U. S. P. And core supporting information should also fit into that in my mind it c...

an go two ways it should either differentiate against and above what competitors are offering or it will tap into the buyer's strongest emotions. Of course in a perfect world, your description will be able to hit the mark on both. If you only focus on the end user, then the description has no leverage for comparison shoppers who are trying to gauge the difference between similar options. On the flip side. If you only focus on elevating the product above competitor options, you're at the risk of losing connection and relevancy for buyers for long descriptions. I recommend highlighting the U. S. P. At the start and the end. That's just a basic human memory principle. People tend to remember the book ends but we often gloss over the middle. So use that space for supporting information and secondary benefits. I should also explain. The USP doesn't only determine the main facts and benefits that you're going to include and focus on in the description. It also influences the kind of language that you will use to discredit. Another big question to ask is what is the brand personality? What descriptive words that you choose need to align with the brand as a whole. Now this is easiest to see in action. So let's go back to the exercise sheet from before practice writing multiple descriptions for the same simple products, a wood coffee table, a simple glass face, a plain white t shirt, whatever for this exercise, simple is better, but it really doesn't matter what item you pick as you write different variations. Imagine the specific audience and brand style that you're aiming to match. How can you make the variations feel distinctly different. I recommend exploring the wide range of adjectives, benefits and product facts that naturally fall on opposite sides of the spectrum. That is a lot of things and hear some to get you started serious versus lighthearted luxury versus necessity. Professional versus casual. High energy versus calm, mature versus useful, natural versus artificial, masculine versus feminine, exclusive versus accessible, elite versus approachable edgy versus mainstream and of course there are a lot more polar opposites to consider for nuanced descriptions. But I think that list is a good place to start. In my example, I'm looking at this three legged wood coffee table. The first description that I will be writing will adopt a serious tone of voice for a luxury brand that promotes an elite, calm style. Something like for example, elevate your space with a natural accent. This hand finished acacia wood top is artfully lacquered to bring out warm caramel colors and emphasize the curving wood grain, three angled wood legs give this coffee table a balanced, distinctive air that effortlessly blends into your modern decor. I specifically chose words like elevate artfully distinctive and effortlessly. Also notice how I use visual descriptors to emphasize function, which promotes a more thoughtful design, aware piece of furniture, like how the hand finished lacquer emphasizes the color. Now let's flip it 3 60 in this example, the same piece of furniture is being sold by a company that targets young women. Let's think teens and dorm rooms. The goal will be to write with a mainstream casual style so different. In this case, I might write this quirky wood coffee table is the perfect conversation starter, add a natural accent with swirling caramel colors to brighten up your space whether you prefer to stack up textbooks, surf snacks to friends or display your makeup collection. This multifunctional table is an absolute must have. Obviously the language here is much more conversational and quite a bit trendier for this age group. The real world benefits aren't just an elevated sense of style, it would also have to be multifunctional to serve small spaces. Outlining specific applications, brings that concept to life and really taps into the young female audience for your practice. I have a challenge. See if you can write three different descriptions for this very simple vase. The first will highlight necessity and accessibility with a mainstream calm voice. The next might be a real challenge. So get creative, maybe reimagine the function and material of it. It doesn't have to be a glass face. Maybe this is a triton plastic water jug and the cap just isn't shown here. That one will be a masculine high energy description that uses an edgy tone of voice and leans more towards artificial rather than any natural focus. Finally, write something casual and light hearted for a luxury mature audience. Don't pause a lesson quite yet you'll come back to this exercise in just a minute first. I want to talk to you about the target audience and share some of my favorite tips about writing for highly stylized brand personalities. Now I already mentioned that making distinctive style choices you should match it to your reader. So let's get into that. Who is the target audience. So who will be purchasing the products? You would also be good to consider who will eventually be using the product. Is it a gift? For example, with Children products, you should write directly to the person who will be actually reading the description and shopping for the item. So right to parents, grandparents and caretakers, the sub audience. Children in this case should impact the emotional tone of the piece and you may choose to reference them, but you should not write usage examples in an infantilized voice as if you're speaking directly to the child. Again, you're telling the parent how the child will use the product. So here's a tip. How do you know what kind of USP and brand personality you should focus on? Well, first I recommend looking for competitor links that align with the brand. Always a good place to start look for common adjectives. They're descriptive writing style and any benefits that the competitor isn't covering. Even if the other product technically has the same exact list of main features, there might be an important point that the competitor is underselling now. Is that a missed opportunity that you can focus on in your riding for a competitive edge. Then take hints from the brand's visuals, their audience and the existing catalog. Trust your gut. Honestly, we've been sold a lot of things in our lives and I really do think that we all have a deeper awareness of marketing strategy and brand styles than we might even realize above all focus on boosting credibility and be as consistent to the core of the brand as possible. And here's another tip about style because or not, a skilled copywriter is flexible enough to write for different industries, but they won't lose their personal tone of voice. You should practice riding across a wide range of styles, but don't actively try to overwrite your natural voice clients will hire you because they like what you produce and the work that they've read in your portfolio. So if you don't sound like yourself, it won't sound genuine. I think of it like I'm putting on different costumes to serve all of those unique brand voices, but at the end of the day, I'm still the same writer. Alright, now it's time to put on those different costumes. Go ahead and go back to the writing exercise if you haven't already and test your flexibility as a skilled copywriter. You have now learned how to pick a USP match the brand personality and right to your target audience. Now it's time to put those skills to work when you're dining with a practice exercise will continue on in the next chapter, I'll be sharing the three most common copyrighting mistakes and what to do instead. See you in the next one

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