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Compositions

Lesson 21 from: Creating Brand Identity Systems

Brian Schmitt

Compositions

Lesson 21 from: Creating Brand Identity Systems

Brian Schmitt

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Lesson Info

21. Compositions

Lesson Info

Compositions

it's important to assemble branding examples to communicate your vision to partners. This will help you plan with the end in mind and consider the usage of your branding program testing that it works in context and eventual use placing designs into context is imperative to selling your branding work because while your imagination maybe limitless your clients and creative partners can only see what you show them, create realistic compositions showing your branding program and actual designs as well as future designs. It may live in these can not only help to get people on board for an idea before it exists. They can act as a north star to achieving a goal and list three D renderers to create models of your products for your brand if the product doesn't already exist, see the original sketches and three D. Comps of coke bottles from when I was first designing them with our engineer to selling the concept of the branding to the final products. Now here's some early renderings and then the...

re is the first round of what we shared for bottle design back then this was a plastic bottle. But doing these compositions really, really helped us to think about how we wanted the logo to work and get, you know, this sold in from the beginning as sort of an idea. We're trying like I said, not just bottle designs but thinking about communication and these early, you know, ideas of flavor compositions and how to like, you know, try things that might not exist yet. The product that's coming out, what are the delivery trucks look like, you know, these kind of things end up being fun as well as more hardworking things like brand communication. So in your work create as many compositions as you can show people what the end result can look like, sort of be their imagination, you know, dream on their behalf as well. And you know, I think that this, this context provides the consumer point of view. So if you're able to show what advertisement looks like for a brand when it first comes out, you're kind of showing what the consumer might see. You know, they're not just going to see your logo on a white page by itself, they're going to see a brand somewhere out in there in the world, so that when people go to make an ad, they understand how to do that. So it's showing how it works, um, and selling and clarifying an ideal branding program choice. So if you, if you take a logo and you put it into all these examples that can really clarify for you, if it's the right thing and it can also sell to your partners get them on board with by seeing so much in context, they know it can work there assured. Um, and they're also, you know, hopefully impressed by the branding that you've done and how it extends, you know, how does everything come together and how do you take what you have from your own vision as a designer and get people to buy off on that vision? So, I'm talking about the 90% rule of trying to get everything done 90% upfront. Um in the very beginning, this is a great way to do it, you know? So rather than just taking uh logo and putting it on a page in front of your client and creative partners, I encourage you to create as many compositions as you can, showing the branding and use um showing context, showing how it's used and exploring and trying for yourself, how it might be used to understand the thinking through the application. People can see that if you're able to show all these ways of use, you fill in the dots of, you know how why just by sort of showing it and when you do a composition. So like, for instance, when I was creating compositions for the Okey project, I was thinking not just about how trying the logo and how it worked on bottles. I was also thinking about photography style for when we'd be shooting the bottle later. And I'm able to inject some of this thinking into my comps as well. It's a chance to test what works and what doesn't with a brand identity system. And once you have all your applications, you can gather them together and show uses for a style guide. So it's really important to take a logo, take your color, take your fonts, take your patterns, take everything and try it and as many applications as you can, hopefully ones that fit applications that you're making for the brand and show usage, um, and include those in your style guide. This is the 90% upfront work of visualizing the brand and that's what's going to help you sell your vision is to make a bunch of work up front, arrive at, say, here's my sharpest point, here's the best logo, or here's the best group of logos and then showing the whole world of how those could look to sell your vision.