}
Skip to main content

Designing Kitchen Icons in Adobe Illustrator

Lesson 5 of 9

Scale Stroke Options for Consistency

 

Designing Kitchen Icons in Adobe Illustrator

Lesson 5 of 9

Scale Stroke Options for Consistency

 

Lesson Info

Scale Stroke Options for Consistency

you know how you have multiple things in front of each other. Say we're doing napkins or you wanna have multiple items of things and you don't want all of these to just touch each other. So if I start off and I'm going to create a napkin here napkins air really difficult, folks. Okay, I just created a napkin. Let me turn on my snap to grid here. Make sure that's on. And here is my napkin. Snap to grid is now on. There's my napkin, and there's my napkin with nice little rounded edges. Now, here's a really cool trick. I'd like to create a fan of napkins right here. So I have my napkin, and I rotate this a little bit. So got that. And I'd like to create this spreads from a duplicate this napkin, and I'm gonna rotate this back to their and I want one in front of the other. I'm gonna put a white stroke on all of these objects, so I'm gonna put a stroke here of five millimeters, and I'm going to make it white. And I'm going Teoh, make this stroke on the outside of my object so that it doesn'...

t take up, so doesn't look like much happens. But here's the cool part. When you begin to position these behind each other, then you get this little knockout, so it makes it look like you have this little buffer zone in between. So if I then take this and move this over, rotate this as well, and then send this to the back as well. Then you can go and you can set this up so that it looks like these objects have this little space around them. And, of course, we put this on a colored background. You're going to see the white there. But this is a really cool way to go in and separate things out. If you've got multiple items that are on top of each other, you want one pot in front of the other, and you don't want to go in and actually cut it all apart. Putting this nice little border around it and putting the border on the outside of your object doesn't actually change the shape. We could take all these. I could make them small, snap them to it. Now you'll notice when I scaled those down, one of the problems that we have when we scale stroke objects is all my stroke stayed exactly the same, Which is great if I'd like to be consistent. But if I go when I scale my objects and I'd like to stroke to scale with the objects One of the things you have to remember is if you go to your transform panel here in your control bar that if you want your strokes to scale with your objects so if you make them bigger, the strokes are going to scale proportionately. You need to turn on your scale, stroke and effects. If I then go and I who make these larger, you'll see that the strokes will expand when I scaled them. If I don't want them to scale and I want them to remain the same, I can turn this off and I can make thes much larger. And the stroke weight will remain exactly the same regardless of my scaled size of my object. But this is a great way to go through and create thes. It'll buffers all around there. If you want to dio multiple object overlays on there that works, have toe line it up but that's snap to grid. Like I said can kind of be a pain when you're trying to get things in here because they snap. Especially when you have rotated objects. They tend to snap too weird locations as well, huh? So going through. Got lots of great objects in here. You know what got this. We need a blender. Don't wait. Absolutely. Blenders air. Great. Well, you know, you start off with a blender. Here, look at this great little coffee cup. That's gonna make a fantastic blender. I can tell you right now, the only difference between this and the blender is of course, blenders always have the little glass lines in here. So we put in a couple lines so that we have our blender. Make sure this snaps to our grid. There we go. There's our blender. If we need a top on the blender. Really easy way to do that. We can create a line on top of our blender, like so can have a touching. Or you could have it snapped to there so we could have our blender top. And then if we need a little lead to grab on to Of course, we can create a little rounded rectangle. It's hard when you work at this size to get these air we dio there's the lid of our blender right there if we want that now, we need our blender base and our blender base is going to be a nice little object like this. And it's also gonna have a taper for some good fitting good footing on there as well. These I need to set. So the stroke is on the inside. There we go. So they line up there is my object. I'm gonna kick the base out. Little bit for stability. So select that corner. It's like that corner definitely needs to have rounded corners. That looks far too unsafe. There we go, and it needs little feet. Awesome. So we've got feet. Who goes up? Got feet? Got a little blender, right? There actually is like a little person with a hat, doesn't it? Absolutely. Totally. Yeah. There you have it. Course, if you need to have something with a plug to. It's always fun to go in and create a plug. Plug is ridiculously easy. It's literally half a circle. So you take the circle, take another rectangle over the top. Subtract the front like both, of course. Subtract the front and then you take your little prongs right there. There you have it. There's your plug. Of course. Then you can run your nice full extension cord anyway, that you wanna have it. Plug it in. What other appliances do we have in the kitchen? Toasters, Blenders? You know, coffee maker. Absolutely. Totally. Gotta have a coffee maker. Coffee gets a little coffee pot. Of course, the coffee pots are always rounded at the bottom right there and then you need your toe lip coming out the side here. So I need to set this so that it's on the insides of the strokes on the inside. We need the lip coming out here. So in this case, what I'm going to do is I'm going to add another point to my line right here and this. I have to go in and use my pen tools that I can go in and just land another point on my line. So now I can use my direct selection tool to, of course, pull that out because you need your little coffee maker. But it's also looks like a measuring one. So we're gonna do both okay. Because of measuring measuring cup is going toe have just handle. And a handle was nothing more than a a rounded rectangle like this that has a little bit of extra rounded nous to it, like so. And then we just get rid of our edges right there. And that could be our handle for our coffee pot. Because then we can do this. We can have their handle for the coffee pot right there. Or if we take this whole thing and we need measuring cups, then, of course, we have the safety handle, and we just get rid of this and we hot dog the ends. Luckily, I've got my little right there. Put that in there. We have our little measuring cup. Mm. And of course, if you have to go ahead and have this on a burner and you actually want flames Oh, my gosh. Flames are actually This looks like a big water droplet. It isn't folks, it's a flame. Okay? And if you want to show how hot the flame is, then you can go in and take this and I'm going to go to my pet. I'm going to offset the path, and I'm going to make this smaller inside here. In fact, let me turn off this stroke. Here's but a stroke on so we can see what we're actually doing. Path offset path. And I'm going to bring this in so that my shape is right there. And if you want a little flame, we can have a border around this. And then we could fill this with color. If we wanted Teoh or like we've done with their other objects, I could fill it with a shade of gray and there we could have a little flame turn off my snap to grid kind of bump that down. Perfect little flame. If you want deviled eggs, you just around the top to both of them and then you have deviled eggs. I know maybe you have a coffee pot over deviled eggs. Who knows it's happened before, I'm sure. So there's little flames and our coffee pot. And, of course, if you want to show coffee inside, there can take your shape, object offset path, and I can reduce the size of this inside my coffee pot switch that to a Phil. Change the level of Phil wherever I want. Teoh, turn on my snap. Two guides and I've got my amount of water, coffee, whatever it may be I need around these corners to match that coffee pot. But here's the tricky thing, because I've already gone in and they rounded it. No, it did. Around the corner is a little bit. I guess that's kind of matching our shape right there. So there's our coffee pot. And if we need a little lid right there, that becomes a simple line across the top course that gets a little hot dog ends. That's a bit extreme for the lid right there. And of course, you need a little dome right there, which becomes a circle oval right there with the bottom missing. Oh, look, we just made a lid for a pot as well. That works pretty good. Doesn't it need the lid for a pot right there? Awesome. Make any pot. You've got a lid for it.

Class Description

Icons have the ability to convey a lot of information in a single graphic. If you need a custom icon and have Adobe Illustrator, this class is for you. Adobe certified instructor Jason Hoppe will take you through the icon creating process and demonstrate this by creating a set of over twenty icons around a central theme.

Topics include:

  • Using a Grid structure for alignment
  • Setting up Object Styles
  • Using the Scale Stroke options for consistency
  • Alignment and Spacing tips
  • Create simple yet effective drop/slip shadows and great highlights
  • Best ways to save/export icons for the best display and use


Software Used: Adobe Illustrator CC 2017

Reviews

Tomas Verver
 

I like Jason's teachingstyle. Nice to see that just using symple shapes and a few trucs can help you make icons.

Eileen
 

I learned some nifty techniques! For example, how to easily change sharp corners to round ones, and how to subtract simple shapes from each other and use them as building blocks to create icons.