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Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 14 of 17

360 Shooting In The Field Part 2

 

Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 14 of 17

360 Shooting In The Field Part 2

 

Lesson Info

360 Shooting In The Field Part 2

All right. So here we are a little further along in our path, we're making our way through the woods. And we had this opening, um, is opening up of a vista right in our path, and it's super beautiful. We got of sun, sort of just peeking out above the trees here in the horizon. We've got, um, some really bright spots and some darker spots. Um, typically GoPro's have a bit of a drop off, you know, after 10 15 feet, 18 feet start, you know, started getting a little blocky, but actually, having an open vista is a really nice feeling inside of the VR headset being able to just really look around and see a big open space. And at the same time Ah, diversity is nice. University inside that real estate, that 3 60 real estate. So, um, on this side, we've got this big open space, but on the inside of the bend here, um, actually, it's a tight it's very close in proximity to the camera. And what that will do when you're for your audience is allow you to really take in this big vista. And at the sam...

e time, if you look the other way. You get this fine detail of little blades of grass and small little bits of hay that have collected here. It's really beautiful. It's sort of purplish, almost the way the hair stands up on this mountainside. And and so that will be a sort of a bonus, an extra opportunity for people, for your audiences to get more out of their 3 60 experience. So it doesn't just doesn't just lie flat like this, where everything is in one piece of proximity. All of a sudden we have this sort of close and far at the same time, and that gives you kind of two different things to look at inside this sphere. So as we continue our way on this walk in the woods, um, just be thinking, you know, when I am, I gonna pop the camera open when I'm gonna turn this thing on, Um, what is the son look like taking in all the sides, really thinking in a 3 60 way? So there is no background and foreground. There's just everything and what's close to the camera? What's far for the kids? So we've got the we've got the primary lens pointing out toward the vista because we're gonna consider this the vista shot. However, um, half the shot again is very close to the camera, so it will be a surprise. Okay, so I'm on a roll, and then we're gonna run rolling on camera, rolling on audio, and okay, now we can see. So this is the creativelive. Crew shooting me talking, um, and setting this camera up. Now, remember, we are to the camera, so I'm looking all around. Um, and you can see what the cameras viewpoint is. That's the audience. Now I run away, Um, as as you do, and eventually this crew will run away, too. And we can even skip ahead in the timeline. I need to see them run away. Ah, and you can get the idea I was talking about. So that open vista sort of long horizon, you get these little silhouetted mountain tops and peaks in the distance, Um, brights and darks got all this contrast going on there. And we're right by a sort of opportunity to sit by a bench. You know, you can imagine as an audience like you're on this walk and you get close to the bench. Kind of take a break, you know, kind of enjoy. Enjoy the view and smell the flowers. And here is that sort of ah, peeking out, son moment. Right, um, as we look up, see how dramatic that can be? Sort of the God rays coming out, And at the same time, we see that that close mound with that beautiful sort of soft purple hair. Um, how It's very close to us. And so that's just a nice little It's a nice value added for the audience because we're going to start this shot. As you saw, we're starting that shot with this open vista. And inevitably, you kind of look and look and looking like Oh, man, The sun I love it And whoa, I'm right next to a mountain. And here I am on this path and really positions you in this walk in the woods and we're coming into turn the camera. We're under this beautiful little canopy taking a break on our walk to hear moment, smell of flowers. Spend time in this little section of our path in the civil section of Tilden Park. And, um, we're gonna allow our audience to really take in the stillness. Um, we're gonna use this opportunity to capture, to capture the small space, to capture a place that makes you realize that there's little details forever, right? Sort of the micro cosmos moment. Um, where every leaf and every branch of this big tree, um, is its own universe. So that's what we're gonna bring to our audience. We're gonna allow them to see that spent time in that. And so that's what we're parked here. Um, I'm going to capture this. These things are very close to the camera. Ah, they say with this camera that about three feet, um, you know, 3 to feet is a good distance toe have humans, but actually, with nature with more inanimate objects, you can have the objects much closer to the camera, so we can actually get even closer. But we'll fall off a cliff. So I'm gonna do that today. Um, but the idea that you get encapsulated inside of the headset is a very powerful feeling. Um, even if it's a still moment, it can really, uh, open your mind about small spaces. So let's, uh, let's go ahead and record it and then I'm gonna run away as they do. Okay? So, rolling everything is rolling. Just do a quick scan to make sure we're all rocking and rolling. And then class. All right, then we run. Okay, so here we are in our bend. Um, looking at this sort of tight space, this canopy that I described, and you can see this tree arching over us. Here's ah, it is what it looks like when a person is very close to the camera, you can see some of that ghosting happening. Uh, right. So that's how you know you've gotten too close. Um, and here I am kind of walking away from the shot and idea is to really absorb You know, this feeling, this feeling that you're surrounded by little tight 1,000,000 little things, right? A 1,000,000 little universe is all around you. Of course. Creativelive crew has not run away yet, but I will make them run away quickly here. Or just hurry it along. There we go. Eso appear on the left. You can see this little, uh, signifier. This is a symbol to let you know that the film, the video you're watching, I guess it does let you click a well, and the video you're watching on YouTube is a 3 60 videos. So any 3 60 day, you, too will have that little symbol there. Um, and it looks like it allows you also to control it. And I think you can also do that with the keyboard as well. Um, now, when you're on your phone on your watching, 3 60 content on YouTube, you can either have it in sort of a naked mode, right? So no, no headset required. You just move your phone all around you, um, and spin in a circle. Um, you can have it where you use your finger to drag like this. So you get the idea. You're right on the edge. Kind of get a moment to look down this hill. You get a moment to spend time space and look all around and sort of feel like you are continuing on this journey through the woods along our walk in the woods. Of course, we're gonna stumble upon little benches opportunities to catch our breath. Um, we're gonna want to take that space, because when you put your audience in the shoes of someone walking, Um, psychologically, neurologically. They're convinced that they are going on a walk, and they're gonna feel tired. There's a pills, downhills, ravines in vistas, and at some point, you might wanna have ah, have a seat on your walk. And so this is kind of an opportunity where we're gonna bring the camera height down to a sitting height, sitting position, um, to take on the perspective of someone who's sitting. Remember, our camera is our audience camera is the head of our audience. And so, um, as I positioned this camera, I make sure, Okay, it's pretty much in my eye line. Um, actually, I cheat a little lower than myself because, uh, sometimes those that are shorter audience members tend to think it is a little too high if you ride right at my height. So I go a little lower. Um, what we're gonna do here, there was bring the camera all the way as close as we can to the bench. And what that does is we're gonna trick our audiences into believing they're sitting on the bench having this quiet moment, finding some peace, getting some rest from their walk in the woods. So I'm gonna go ahead and record. You get to see kind of the wind blow and the natural motion that would come out of nature on. We're gonna get to spend some time in that. And I'm just gonna roll. Um, for two minutes will set a timer, and, uh, now we won't go too long or too short. Um, but that will give us enough time to work with. And if it if it makes sense, we need to slow something down or, you know, we want to kind of extend that shot beyond the two minutes, Um, can always look a looping are finding a way to kind of extend that. But my feeling is that two minutes on the bench is more than okay. Okay, so we're rolling. Rolling, Okay. No, we hide. All right, so here we are, inside the camera sun is really glaring. Now get this pretty cool lens flare thing happening, clapping right on it, and I'll run away. And eventually the crew will run away and so will be left in this sort of sitting position. Now we can go back in and paint out this sort of thing. You just go into Photoshopped and clean up that little moment and then dropped that in like a plate, Um, so that we don't see the camera shadow, but for this case, I think it's fine. But that is something that you know you could think about doing. If you really want to get in and make sure all the details of our audience to really immerse themselves, sometimes it can take people out of it when they see the shadow of the camera about because, of course, they're interested to see how it works. And, you know, and all of a sudden there mind is in a space where they're thinking about this as a film and thinking about this is something that's crafted and not actually as an experience they're having, right, So that sort of breaks the illusion there. Um, but in general, the idea is that, you know, as you make look around this periphery, you see, the edge of the bench kind of feels like, Oh, man, I'm sitting in this bench, you know? And here is a guy walking by. They could just service. Here's a person jogging with her dog and all of a sudden, here you are sitting still. So I think it's a pretty cool moment. I think. You know, I think using the sort of lens flare opportunity is kind of nice. It really does remind you of real life where you have to squint sometimes, uh, that, you know, that that's all part of it. I think that's sort of the struggle, the nuances of struggle in life and and dealing with things, you know, like a bright sun. Ah, that's all part of it. That's additive to this experience to the idea that we're giving people experiences and not just sort of promotional videos. Well, now we're gonna wrap up. Um, we've gotten a chance. Teoh, get a few beautiful moments. Sort of enjoy our walk through Tilden Park. Ah, walk around inspiration point. And it always ah, rises. Like Did we get enough shots? Do we get what we needed for the film that we want to make in? Um, and I do believe in over coverage. I do think, you know, you always want to take a few extra shots, capture a few extra minutes role for a little longer than you would normally. Then you think you need to, but ah, but I think for today I think we've gotten what we've come for. Um, I think that Ah, you know, we got an opportunity to really bring out the power of this device. You know, 3 is an opportunity for us to take people to new places and, um, and as we go into the ingest process and then the stitch process And as we look at the footage, I think you really get a chance to see you know what happens. Um, what happens when we allow people to step inside the shoes of this camera? Um, and you'll get the idea that you really are on a journey along with this camera along with us. You'll be on this journey with me and ah and weaken. You know, maybe we go back to the park Ranger and we get a voiceover interview. You know, we could lay that in, and so you kind of get the park Ranger vibe. Or, you know, we could go a different route and make it really meditative and and add some singing bowls and make this kind of have that space in that meditation. Um, but the idea that we get to allow everyone in the world with access to a phone with access to YouTube 3 60 or Facebook 3 60 to get to step inside this park, get to spend time in this place. Um, I think it's really, you know, we're in a magical time. In some ways, the future is here Where were able to bring people to new places to teleport people. So, um, thanks for coming on the walk with me and and enjoying the shoot. Um, we are going to now take this all back to my office, and we're gonna ingest the footage And what's beautiful about this camera? Um, the Google camera. What they did, it was Ah, not only do all the cameras sync up together, um, but actually, the way that they write on the cards, um, it doesn't really matter which card you take out. You don't have to label. The cards you don't have to worry about is camera one card one. Um, it knows which card goes to which camera when you ingest the footage. And so, um, we're just gonna be able to drag nine cameras first, and then we'll take the remaining seven cameras, um, cards and we'll ingest all the footage, General, organize it all. Um, Google has provided this sort of jump. It's called the jump system, and it's ah both like a content management and the stitching in the cloud and uses an algorithm to stitch in the cloud. And what it's going to do is stitched together all of these rectangles. So each of these is creating a rectangle all the way around. Um, the algorithm is going to stitch all those rectangles together, and we're gonna end up with a 3 63 D. So it has a left and a right. I, um so it actually is creating two spheres, the left sphere and rights here, and they're gonna be inside each other to give you three D scents, and then the top and the bottom get blurred. The way the Google algorithm works is ah, the cameras only cover to about this spot. And then once you're here, this will get blurred with the color of the pixels just below the blur on the same will happen on here. So you'll get about a ring like this. It will probably be mostly green and brown at the bottom and mostly blue at the top, but will be sort of that Ghazi and Blur. Look, um, it used to be where this camera the stitching provided. Ah, hard line of you know, him. It was a black circle at the top of the bottom. That was a very strange feeling when you would put the headset on and you'd be standing on top of a black circle because it felt like you weren't really there. You were sort of falling through whatever you're looking at. And so they've, um they've updated it. I've updated the algorithm to now include, like, kind of a colored blur, um, to just give you the sense that you're standing on the ground. Um, what we do sometimes is we'll go back in and take a single GoPro and we'll film down, move the move, the tripod will film down, and we'll film up just for a few seconds, and then you can go in and comp those in and replace the Blur. But for this film, and for this extra says, I think it's fine, Teoh. We'll just go with the sort of free stitch that Google provides, which is a beautiful stitch. And, ah, and and they provide color correction, You know, when it's up in the cloud, they get all smoothed out. Um, sometimes if there's a little heavy movement going on near the lenses, you'll see some artifact ing, um, some kind of way venous about the image in our case in our walk in Tilden Park. I don't think we'll see any of that when we get it back. And it takes about 2 to 3 days for the cloud to stitch for the algorithm to work on. Bennett comes back to you. Um, So, uh, yeah, thanks for walking with me in the woods. And we will Ah, I'll see again when we get to the office and we'll start ingesting.

Class Description

Imagine a world where you can create a product for your client where they are immersed in a memory or place; a bride & groom that are able to relive the feeling of their first kiss, a real estate agent that can place clients in their virtual home, a journalist that can transport a viewer in a small village in a foreign country. That world is here, and it’s growing quickly. 


360 Live-Action is a form of photography and videography that allows the viewer to see an entire world. With social channels like Facebook and YouTube adopting ways to publish this medium, the creative world has exploded with new opportunities to share new immersive stories. 

Barry Pousman has been playing with virtual reality for years. His stories and media have been used by such organizations as the U.N. and Google to evoke empathy in viewers with the hope of creating a positive behavioral change. In this course, Barry will introduce you to the world of possibilities created by 360 and VR.
You’ll learn:

  • What exactly VR and 360 Live-Action are and the history behind each of them
  • How you can get started in photography and videography to create stories in 360 Live-Action
  • How to develop, plan, shoot, and stitch together a story in 360 Live-Action
  • How you can enter the market place and participate in the growing world of VR and 360 

Reviews

user-5f6365
 

Great content! Great overview on storytelling and an intro to 360.