The Power of Negotiation

Lesson 14 of 18

Bonus Lesson - Email Negotiation

 

The Power of Negotiation

Lesson 14 of 18

Bonus Lesson - Email Negotiation

 

Lesson Info

Bonus Lesson - Email Negotiation

First thing: email negotiations This is a couple quick little science tips for you on negotiating via email. So, its great to study. Is there more to email negotiation than email? Which is, they found that email comfort is the biggest factor in success. Its actually not really mechanism, its not necessarily how you negotiate, its actually how you feel about negotiation. Meaning, I think, that confidence even comes through the written word. I think, they didn't say this, that is my reading of it. That when you're really confident, whether you're in email or you're in person, you're more likely to succeed. So, specifically, people with high email comfort also naturally rate the email negotiation process much more positively. Being more comfortable with email earns you more profit. So, my encouragement is specifically to ask yourself "am I comfortable on email? Is my partner comfortable on email?" It can be a very effective tool for a piece of the negotiation, or an entire negotiation, de...

pending on your comfort. If you're very uncomfortable with in-person interaction, but you're very comfortable with your number, email is for you. If you're kind of like "I'm not sure if the rapport is gonna be good," it might be good to start and send a lot of materials ahead of time on email to make sure that they have all of the data, cause you're not sure if you can get it all out in time. But then have more rapport building in person. So you can use it as a piece, depending on your comfort levels. I also want you to think about how you can pair it. And this is gonna really specifically go with you. So for me, for our process, my favorite ideal, fluid, nature of negotiation is an original email. They send me an email, I send them back a ton of information: video, proposal, PDFs, a bunch of data, social proof and testimonials. I set up a call with my team member on the call with me. We do a big overview, a big review of the presentation. I do a lot of questions, get their assets, get their pain points, fill out a negotiation cheat sheet, and then close an in person meeting. For me, I know I can almost always close the deal if they have the budget. The nice thing is, now I've learned to quote a range in email. So I have found that in my process, if I can say in that first initial email: "Here's all the social proof, we're about in this range of speakers, if that looks like its in your budget, I would love to hop I a phone call with you." So I have found that mentioning my number in the range up front, really helps me just see if they have the budget or if they don't. So I want you to think about what you can pair it with, where you put it in. And lastly, if you're going to do email, make sure to put your best email face forward. An interesting study about pictures, versus data, in this study, they had radiologists who were reviewing reports, see a patient's photo. They put the patient's photo just on the top of the chart. They found this increased, this is terrifying, their diagnostic accuracy, by 46%. Just having a little picture. By the way, non of your charts include a picture. I always, I don't know if you guys have see it, I have a business card with a picture on it. I give it to every single doctor. Because you know why? They drop it in my file. So when they look at my file, cause I call in, they open it up: "Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. The Behavioral Investigator." They would not know that otherwise. So I give my card with my picture on it to almost everyone because they put it in my file. So if you can have a little email picture avatar, put your email in your little byline like, you know how realtors often have the bottom, like Re/Max agents always have their website and their little picture? There's a reason for that: they know it builds trust. So if you can, add your picture. Another thing about this: they also spent 29% longer on their diagnosis. We just feel like we connect with the person better. Its basically your email rapport. About 80% of the key diagnostic findings came only when the radiologist saw the patient's photo. Crazy. So, photos always. I have photos on my website, I have photos on my Linkedin, I have photos on my email, and all of my proposals, as you guys saw. More email tips: add a photo. Also, great way to do this is sending a video proposal. So in your email, this is what I do in all of our email proposals, if its a really big fish, we have a picture, we have a couple pictures of me speaking, I have all of our social proof, and I'll say, actually Lauren says it. Lauren says: "Vanessa recorded a little video for you to follow up." Where I will record a video and say: "Hey Greg, great to meet you. You know, I'm really familiar with your company. I've been a customer for a long time. I cannot wait to do this presentation with you. I see that you're really interested in a sales training and a marketing training. Hoping we can hop on the phone, and the budget works out for you. Looking forward to talking to you." It's basically a video voicemail, but its in the email. We get a response 100% of the time. Yeah? When you're negotiating, instead of just making a simple phone call, will you try to do a video phone call or a video conferencing? If you can? Such a good question. Only if you are comfortable with video. I like video, so I'm comfortable with it. You don't like video, if you don't like being on camera, that would not be good for you because it would lower your confidence levels. So yes, if you can do FaceTime, or Zoom? Zoom is my favorite, best business purchase I ever bought. Its a video conferencing software. I think it's $40 a month, and I have the premium plan. Best software ever. Noel and all the body language trainers, we do office hours once a month, or once every two months on video. And its the greatest because you can see everyone on the video office hours. So, if you can, yes. And then when you say you're pairing the email, do you mean you personalize it, not like a rubber stamp that you send to everybody, a generic one, is that what you mean? I mean, so A: I do have canned responses but I definitely tweak them and tailor them. But also, I might think about the customer flow. So first they email me, and then I immediately pair it with a phone call. Or the phone call, I'm going to immediately pair it with an email. Right, so its more like thinking about what communication comes first in my ideal, if I could set it up. Thank you. Yes. This is sort of a nitpicky, logistical - No, no, yeah. Logistics, good. When you send that little video follow up, is that one of those new fancy things? Or is it a link? - No, good question of logistics. We have to get into the nitty gritty. Here's exactly how I do it. I open up Photo booth on my computer, or I use my phone if I'm traveling. I record the video, real casual, on my phone. I'm gonna make sure I'm not in my pj's or something. But real casual on my Photo booth. I export the video to my desktop. I don't do any editing on it, nothing. Just export, or I click the video. And I either send the video from my phone, or I upload it to Dropbox, and send them the Dropbox link. Thank you. - Or Google Drive link. Easy, yeah. Nothing fancy. Good question. Its not a special app. And everyone knows Dropbox links and Google Drive links. Its great. Always have a "call me" option. So if you're going to be doing a lot of emails, make sure that either in the email, in the body of the email, or right at the bottom you say: "oh, as always, feel free to call me with any questions. Here's my number." Oftentimes just having that there is a reminder you'll get people who prefer phone. So just be aware that you should have that for those people as an option.

Class Description

Do you get uncomfortable asking for what you want? 


Do you worry about how much you are worth? 

Do you have a hard time saying “no” and standing up for yourself? Do you feel like you are always getting the short end of the stick? It’s time for you to learn the science of negotiation. No longer lose clients, not get that raise you deserve, and finally, stop being the underdog. 

Join Vanessa Van Edwards, published author and behavioral investigator, who has been featured on NPR, Forbes, CNN and USA Today, who will teach you her never-been-taught-before personal negotiation strategies. 

We negotiate all the time -- from job interviews to client meetings to mattress buying to getting your spouse to the do the dishes. Everyone needs to understand the dynamics of powerful negotiations. 

This class is for you if you: 
  • Agonize about claiming your worth 
  • Have a fear of saying no because you think you might offend someone. 
  • Worry about negotiations because you are afraid they might turn into confrontations 
  • Have a lack of confidence when standing up for what you want. 
  • Are uneasy because you know you could be making more money in your job or business, but you don’t know how to ask. 
Learn Vanessa's new research, get word-for-word swipe files, scripts, and Vanessa’s personal formula for negotiation that she has never given out before.

In this class you will: 
  • Learn the science behind negotiation so you can take more control over your negotiations. 
  • Know and prove your worth so you can ask for what you need. 
  • How to predict a "no" coming on and how to pivot to turn it into a faster "yes". 
  • How to identify boss or client's reservations so you can prepare your pitch or conversation. 
This could be a day long class, but instead, it has been designed to be short, dense and digestible and something you can always go back to before heading into a negotiation. 

Our goal is for you to watch and rewatch this course anytime you are about to step into a negotiation room.

Reviews

yourorganizedhome
 

Vanessa is such a life changer. I feel so priveledged to have discovered all the wisdom that she shares. My dream is to be able to afford an in person training course with her. In the meantime, I watch the courses and purchasing them so that I can listen over and over. Wish my mom, who is now on life support would have been healthy and alert to have listened with me since my mother is my inspiration to seek how teachings from people like Vanessa. Mom, hoping that you know that I am continuing in your footsteps. Thank you Vanessa and hoping one day to learn from you in person.

Michele Gibson
 

What a valuable course! I appreciated Vanessa Van Edwards turning negotiation into a learnable skill. She lays out, step by step: * how to prepare for a negotiation, including a comprehensive worksheet, * what to say (and what not to say) during the negotiations, and * how to follow-up in the most effective manner. I learned skills applicable to complex work situations as well as getting my kids to do more chores. She teaches you how to turn an adversarial negotiation into a "partnership" which not just sounds good, but it is good and she gives you detailed, insightful guidance for how to do this. The 116 page workbook is crammed with practical insights. The 3 hour class and bonus materials are jam-packed with information I can use right now. So worth the investment.

Kaeli Sweigard
 

This was the perfect course at the perfect time for me. I have a lot going on right now and I know these skills are going to help me out every step of the way. They are transferable to so many situations! I can't believe how much awesome stuff there is in the workbook. Every question I have is answered, and there are so many examples, it's insane! Everyone should do this course.