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Using Your Style To Diversify Your Photography

Lesson 3 of 6

Catching Sentimental Moments

 

Using Your Style To Diversify Your Photography

Lesson 3 of 6

Catching Sentimental Moments

 

Lesson Info

Catching Sentimental Moments

Catching sentimental moments in a perfectly composed manner. So I'm obsessed with framing. Everything about me was with framing and um, I'm so obsessed with it because I used to watch a a lot of TV. I'm pretty much, my dad worked a lot as an electrician, he has his own business and stuff, so basically my baby sitter was a Sega Genesis and TV. So after playing so many video games and Nintendo for so long you start to notice and understand the way that they frame things. And, I tried to do, When mI started to get into photographer I wanted to apply that same kind of framing myself. I like to keep things very simple but at the same time it's all about putting yourself in the right position to make it simple in the first place. This is a, we shot, like shooting this photo like this I was hanging out of a taxi but I already kind of had in mind that I didn't want the full frame to be with red, I thought that would be too overpowering so I already kind of lined it up in my head to shoot with ...

a little bit of lime green, to give it that extra kind of pop of texture. Plus the dudes are just doing like really dope stuff like smoking cigarettes and hanging out by a bunch of bananas. So they just look cool. This is, this also, is all the photos are in Cuba also. We were just walking by the house and I feel like, you know, framing yourself and setting yourself up for a moment, it takes like point five seconds. And then mI didn't want her to get my attention and see, like you know, there's some weird dude standing in front of her taking a photo. So I kind of, or waited for the right moment when a car was coming passed so I could walk at the right pace so I could be able to snap a photo and capture her in her pensive moment, and still get the texture of the door, so you can see, like you know, you can be invited inside. This is also in Cuba. Framing also is, I don't ne- ever want a shot sometimes, like directly in front of the camera. I want to make sure they can still the road so you can still see basically, where the person is coming from and being able to catch somebody, like a little girl with her teeth all out, and no teeth in her mouth. Definitely reminding me of me, as a kid, what I used to do. You now hanging out with no teeth in my mouth all the time. Just smiling being, you know, crazy. In this photo also was hanging out of a, I shoot out of cars a lot. Maybe that's, maybe it makes it a little bit easier. Maybe I'm really lazy but shooting out of cars is really fun and it's also kind of a game within a game because you have to be really fast and framing yourself properly. This kid is bustin, busting cartwheels down the street. I don't know why but being able to, you know, frame it and capture it so you would be able to get the texture of the door and be able to still see he has like one hole in his sandal is pretty much what it's all about with me. It's still like having it proportioned pretty well. This is one of my favorite photos too. By framing when it came to, came down to this is making sure everything's balanced well. I didn't want the dude on the motorcycle to be too in front of the garage door, I still wanted you to see the texture of that and notice like the fan and stuff. You've still got the stairs going on, you still got somebody on their phone. Like this looks like a real scene of like somebody just kickin it for the day in Cuba. This is what it pretty much looks like all day and people are zooming their cars past. This is one of my also another favorite photo. Framing also, like I love, one of my favorite kind of shots is vanishing point shots and like you know anything that's pretty much like right down the middle because you'll be able to accomplish so much especially when there's tight streets, you really get the feeling of it. Seeing the kid, like the sun in Cuba is relentless. So I had to change it to a black and white photo because it literally just be like all yellow. You wouldn't be able to see anything. This is another photo in Cuba of the streets. It's crazy. I really do enjoy like when it favors my shows too much, I try to implement more in my photos, I don't do it enough as Mr.Robot even though its not through the last season. The way Mr.Robot frames and understands framing in their show is like, just like, so inspiring. It can dictate so much and you can feel so much emotion by the certain way that you frame your shots. Sometimes I like do like little things framing it a little bit lower to make it feel a little bit more grand or a being a little bit higher so you can feel like a little bit more whatever the case may be but I feel like there's always these little slight things that you do to framing that's really cool.

Class Description

Street photographers usually focus on capturing the city dwellers, street scenes, and structures of urban environments. But what happens when they venture outside the city? Is it possible to translate their unique urban style to a more suburban or even rural landscape? Well-known street photographer Steve Sweatpants will show you how to utilize your technical skills and artistic perspective wherever you are—whether it’s a frenetic metropolis or beautiful landscape.

In this class, you’ll learn how to:

  • Diversify your portfolio with a variety of geographies and landscapes.
  • Recognize the tone and color grading that make an impactful image.
  • Use a variety of post-processing techniques to enhance and perfect your photos.

Even if telling urban stories is your specialty, this course will help you discover new ways to incorporate your street style into imaginative and exciting imagery.

Reviews

Marco Wilm
 

very inspiring and I love the attitude of Steve, very positive and uplifting.

Megan Dzwonkowski
 

I love Steve's attitude. He is inspirational as well as honest. I took his street photography class too and enjoyed learning about his process.

Margaret Lovell
 

I enjoyed this course. For me, this was more of an inspirational course versus a technical course. Not that there's anything wrong with that. I enjoy taking both kinds. I took Steve's other course about street photography, and enjoyed the tips as well. Steve's photography is gorgeous, and you feel as if you're part of the scene in each one. His photos draw you in, which is one major reason I enrolled. I also appreciated that he discussed how photographers (especially in the street genre) can look for ways to get their work published.