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Basic Processing for Mobile Photography

Lesson 1 of 7

Class Introduction

 

Basic Processing for Mobile Photography

Lesson 1 of 7

Class Introduction

 

Lesson Info

Class Introduction

My name is Pei Ketron, and today we're gonna be talking about basic processing for mobile photography. Everyone these days is taking photos on their phones and it's really important to know what to do with those photos once you've taken them. There are a whole host of apps out there that you can use to edit images and sometimes it can be hard to narrow it down and decide which one you want to use. So today we're gonna be talking about some of those apps that either free or very low cost. I'm gonna walk you through some of them and by the end you should walk away with a good understanding of how to get started with these apps so that you can make your photos look as great as possible.

Class Description

Everyone always has a phone with them, and that means they always have access to a powerful camera. But once you’ve taken the photos, what can do to make them look truly exceptional? Pei Ketron, photographer and internationally renowned Instagrammer will show you how to use some of the most popular iPhone editing apps to process your images and create a simple and efficient workflow.

In this class, you’ll learn:

  • How to select and use various editing apps
  • iPhone photography workflow
  • Editing to give your images the look you want to achieve

Editing your iPhone pictures doesn’t have to be complicated and this class will show you how to take those images and make them ones that you’ll want to share with your family, friends and on social media.

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

Great except the sound volume is lower than average Creative Live show

PETE
 

It's not her. She clearly knows photography. At least I think she does. But what happened to knowing that you can't really see a photo online that well, especially in something like instagram. And moving sliders is so different than getting the good light in camera, as, you know, photographers do. This is a great way for the lay person to produce better looking photos. Not better photos. It's like taking a profession and learning to fake it, but forgetting to mention that's what you are doing. In this age of short cuts and faking it, shouldn't we just have that clause stated some place: Warning! This is a great shortcut but not great photography. A quick copy of a great work of art produces a quick copy, not art. Are there now people who don't know the difference?