Build a High Volume Senior Photography Business

Lesson 30 of 39

Student Interview About Workflow

 

Build a High Volume Senior Photography Business

Lesson 30 of 39

Student Interview About Workflow

 

Lesson Info

Student Interview About Workflow

It's very talk showing hey uh is not quite judged well below me that don't know I am a closet judge judy freak fan and I watch it every day and everyone makes fun of me for it but if anyone out there can get me on the judge do the show please please please hook your boy up because that would be like heaven to be no um ok, so for those of you ta dave is photography does beauvois pinup stuff he's married to regina she's wonderful. I've met her and w p p ay yeah and regina is going to be doing the majority of the senior work for their business but dave's actually certified in adobe photoshopped he's a certified expert in light room when this guy knows the the software well and through his what's your website so people go look at it david opal dot com dio e p p e l because they say they're not going to spell it right you have to give it one more time david opal dot com it's d o e p p e l so he has a very distinct work it's uh vintage pinup work and it's good I like really you should go che...

ck it out it's it's awesome work enjoy it and dave and I were talking because this is a guy who knows photo shop like ridiculously well and we went out after class yesterday and he was telling me some of the things that he took away from the digital workflow portion that we went over kind of in day one at the end of the day and then you got to see him practice yesterday so let's talk about like what were you doing with your workflow before like how were you working your files? Well actually I mean I thought I had a pretty rock solid work flow through light room and in a photo shop but I mean really what I've realized is I have a rock solid work flo for people that overshoot it is I mean if you're overshooting and you know you get in the light room and you've gotta pick from fifteen of exact same shot you know, it's I mean it could be fast but you're looking at fifteen of the exact same shot so I mean that I got that to where I was pretty quick with it but obviously I'm still wasting a ton of time because I'm going through so many images that are identical so I mean that the first thing that I'm and I really kind of been working on not shooting as much but I still do um so the light room work flows is ok and I'm doing my basic retouching but then man I hit photo shop and it's like all right, what am I gonna do let's see what this looks like with one of these actions or let's go jumpin on water let's jump into nick and I don't know what I'm looking for let's take it back one step okay the files that you're exporting working oh yeah so I'm going I'm going right go right from light room in the photo shop as sixteen bit tiff images and the dhobi rgb gigantic files I mean I've had stuff where I'm bringing it back in the light room and they were so large that so many layers that I had to save it out of the the psb file because it was way too big and thinking that I'm gonna go I might have to go back and tweak something because I don't have a set workflow on what I'm gonna do for those images and I was treating every image like like my personal art project yeah he was saying to me the other day that he is like files that he's worked on they're like four gigs yeah like four gigs I am like I don't have sessions with all the folder is this whole thing's are for gigs for all three copies of my j pegs and all of the ross and the lightning catalyst for cakes so what? He was talking to me about his work low and and it's certainly it's not it's not at all a dig it is work his works awesome this works great, but the way that he was treating his digital files wasn't efficient and wasn't effective and I might end up you know, those only get printed it you know, maybe a sixteen by twenty on their gigantic and, you know, multiple hard drives now because they're they're so big and all the raw files and I'm keeping every single raw file even the accidental shot of the light and I'm horrible I delete those I didn't care if people like if I have test shots, I don't even pretend like I'm going to say though I don't import him, I delete those the moment I see them and why why would you worry about that stuff and there's a lot of people that do that yeah it's like it's hard to delete even ones that you know our junk and and I don't get what it's like almost afraid that if we get rid of it, it might potentially someday there's gonna be some adobe program with a good twenty thirty we're able to take her our pictures of our feet on the ground and get ah award winning prints off of them. It's yeah, it is really when you were talking about going back through the fifteen images, I mean it really if you're going back and forth and back and forth and back and forth and you can't tell the difference what like if you literally if you can't tell the difference if you as the creator of this image if you don't have a gut reaction to go with one over the other the other why would you think your client would yeah why why are why are they going to care if they don't have the vision they don't know the art they don't have the love like you do for your work no one should love it more than you if they don't have that passion in that excitement and if you can't see the difference why would they write some so dave what what changes do you plan to make your work flow like you're talking about layered psd files that are four gigs? What are some of the things that you are going to implement when you get home? Um I'm really goingto try to define the vision for the images before even hit photoshopped I need to have some idea of what that result is going to be and actually have written steps down sol not just experimenting experimenting on my client images I mean I'll do that you know like matthew said in the basement with maker's mark all then I'll go play around but when I'm working on my client images I need to actually have written goals and written a written vision of what I want that toe look like before I get in there and I mean, obviously some of the actions they do create layers, but I have to have to get over the I guess the safety net of I have those I could go back and tweak if I need to and just crunch it down and make it small and I'm going to start going out bringing stuff in and j pegs because I'm not making billboards like I mentioned he's I mean he's gone through certification on adobe he knows how to do stuff he has I mean, he has a better base than than what most would but he still found it comfortable tohave all this information to do all this when he could go and knock out the file again if you want to see it a different way, take him two minutes but someone but he wants that comfort that's security blanket of keeping all that information but it's just not needed he no like now you know, and I'm reaffirming that he knows what he's doing he gets it, he knows how to do it. So now what I think your work full is moving towards is the confidence in that so that if you ever need to go back to an image and make it look a different way he's gonna be able to do that quickly and effectively but he's going to know what it should be before he gets there right absolutely so I've got a thought coming from him from online somebody named regina tio people says dave needs to get rid of the thirty two cards he regina of course is dave's wife a all six of my thirty two big cars and here's a quiz because people talk about you know, file hoarding where they're just like saving everything possible I'm curious I kind of want open this up to everyone how many of you have ever actually gone back and looked it and used any of those images one actually I maintain all my original raws which it's it's hoarding it really is but the trick is that I actually heard from those another photographer that I am zacarias hey actually made a point to say keep all of your originals so that years later if you're going to redo in your portfolio you may not like the way you edited that image so it now if he said he don't have he still have it you go back and redo a different way and I've done that at least ten times the last year just finding some old picture that I want to change that it looked great when I did it but now one of foot was I on just too much maker's mark that was a problem no sir I think I think that's fairly rather I mean like cause I'm the same way I keep all of my roz I keep everything I keep even the ones that I'm like, well, it's blurry, but maybe I want to do something artistic with it down the line and I've literally never gone back and looked, so I'm pleased and some people are, but I think it's it's one of those things that like again, it goes back to what matthew instead of like, well, actually, look at what you're doing and figure out whether that's something that you're actually doing it, you know well, one thing that you touched on cole that I realized when I went, uh, school because I have a degree in photography and what was funny was they had us go out and we had to create aa book of images that we really like, so we had to find photographers that inspired us, and so I went online and I looked through and I found a bunch of of images that I really liked, and I made my little book and I've been blessed to become friends with almost everyone who's work inspired me. I've made it a point to reach out to the people, but I made the this book and it's funny because literally my mom was going through the house the other day, and it seems like once you get a house, your parents call you up in there like you want this crap for we're throwing it away, they come and get your stuff right now, and I'm like it's been there for, like, ten years leave it alone, but in that basement, I found I found the images. And now with the more sophisticated I, after being in the industry for ten years, I can tell you that what I learned is that being able to capture an amazing image, like being able to capture that moment was absolutely what drew me into that photo, and I loved it. But the other thing, I realized that beyond that, the editing spoke to me, and if you have an amazing image, you can add it into junk. If you have an amazing it, it doesn't really go the other way. If you have a really, really crappy file, if it's a really jug, you can't just keep throwing actions on it and it's going to become our, but you can make a beautiful image bad through your editing. And so it was it spoke to me when you were talking about how maybe I should change my editing, and I've gone, and I've done that because absolutely, the editing can affect your how you experience an image, what you like, and so that that that is a good point, thank you, thank you for sharing, so

Class Description

The success of your photography studio depends on your business model, not your location. Learn the key strategies that have propelled a booming second-generation family photography studio for more than 40 years in rural Minnesota.

In this course, Matthew Kemmetmueller will show you how to set up your entire high volume senior photography business step by step — including successful sales tactics, shooting techniques, and efficient workflow practices. You will see Matthew’s strategies in action as he takes you through two live shoots from start to finish — each in under 90 minutes. Matthew will also teach you how to increase the value of your services, market directly to new clients, and create unique products that will delight your customers.

Whether you’ve photographed thousands of seniors or just looking to learn high volume tactics, this course will give you a comprehensive, replicable roadmap for multiplying your revenue.

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

I decided to listen in on the free course of Build a High Volume Senior Photography Business w/ Matthew Kemmentmueller...I thought it would be good to have the skill sets even if I chose to do another photography forum other than seniors. And I was laughing thru the whole thing...he is one funny guy!! So, I decided to buy it...not only is this course full of great tips/advice/ and "did you know facts" but it's really informative and again, he is down right funny. I'm learning lots. Thanks for having him on Creative Live...this one is a keeper.

Diane Yvon
 

I absolutely loved this course. I am primarily a maternity and newborn shooter and to my surprise what I learned here applies to my current work as well as developing my senior work. I thoroughly enjoyed Matthews delivery of each topic as it was clear, precise, fun and non intimidating. I will watch this over and over and the course downloads were amazing! 100% satisfied with this course

fcaisp
 

Matthew's class is excellent! I watched it live, but decided to buy it since it's so foundational. I think his information and materials are excellent, whether someone wants to be "high volume" or not. I love how he continually drove the point home about how so many photographers overwork themselves and gave excellent ways to resolve this issue. CL does such a great job of covering the gamut in education of all types. Thanks!