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Process of Print Competitions

Lesson 39 from: Capturing Story in Portrait Photography

Kelly Brown

Process of Print Competitions

Lesson 39 from: Capturing Story in Portrait Photography

Kelly Brown

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Lesson Info

39. Process of Print Competitions

Photography contests follow a specific pattern. Pinpoint the difference between print and digital competitions, then walk through the process of preparing an image for a print competition.

Lessons

Class Trailer
1

Class Introduction

14:28
2

The Power of Portrait Photography

06:52
3

Introduction to Newborn Portrait

08:30
4

Find Inspiration for Newborn Portrait

11:09
5

Create The Scene for Newborn Portrait

05:58
6

Prepare & Pose Newborn for Portrait

18:03
7

Shoot: Techniques for Photographing Newborn

08:58
8

Newborn Image Review

08:57
9

Introduction & Find Inspiration For Child Portrait

13:03
10

Create The Scene for Child Portrait

05:17
11

Prepare Set for Child Portrait

05:48
12

Shoot: Capture Child Portrait

11:40
13

Image Review for Child Portrait

11:45
14

Introduction & Inspiration For Teenager Portrait

09:05
15

Create The Scene for Teenager Portrait

06:15
16

Building Set for Teenager Portrait

14:01
17

Shoot: Portrait with Teenager

10:43
18

Shoot: Pose Teenager for Multiple Looks

14:23
19

Image Review for Teenage Portrait

08:11
20

Introduction & Inspiration For Adult Portrait

11:31
21

Creating The Scene for Adult Portrait

06:25
22

Lighting for Adult Portrait

04:51
23

Tell Your Subject's Story

04:38
24

Shoot: Lighting for Double Exposure

16:22
25

Introduction to Senior Portrait

08:39
26

Create Storyboard & The Scene For Senior Portrait

10:26
27

Connect With Client to Create Portrait

16:06
28

Shoot: Lighting for Senior Portrait

08:10
29

Shoot: Be Creative on Set

15:09
30

Image Review for Senior Portrait

14:23
31

Portrait Shoots Recap

04:08
32

Global Adjustments in Camera Raw®

05:37
33

Editing In Photoshop® CC: New Born Portrait

24:41
34

Editing In Photoshop® CC: Child Portrait

15:35
35

Editing In Photoshop® CC: Adult Portrait

11:32
36

Editing In Photoshop® CC: Teenager Portrait

11:28
37

Editing In Photoshop® CC: Senior Portrait

13:46
38

Introduction to Entering Print Competitions

02:14
39

Process of Print Competitions

06:17
40

What to Consider For Print Competitions

17:00
41

What Judges Look For Overview

07:14
42

Image Impact

03:42
43

Creativity, Style & Composition in Images

14:04
44

Entering Photography Competitions Q&A

22:50
45

Image Lighting

05:43
46

Image Color Balance

03:56
47

Technical Excellence in Images

07:56
48

Photographic Technique

10:15
49

Storytelling & Subject Matter

09:28

Lesson Info

Process of Print Competitions

When it comes to that process of entering a competition, there's nothing more nerveracking than putting yourself out there for judgment. I can't explain that feeling that you actually get when you submit that photo, but then when you actually get to sit there and watch it get judged, whether it's online or in person, and you almost feel your heart in your throat because you just want one of those five judges on that panel to see something. To see something, because when they all submit their scores, you're getting the average of those scores, so you just need at least one person to go, "You know what? "I see something here. This is pretty amazing." So I'm gonna talk a little bit about that process of print competitions, and how you go about entering. There are a lot of online competitions. We have our own one, which is called The Rise International Photography Awards. And then there's the print competitions, like I mentioned, WPPI. And throughout the world, local associations also have...

their own local competitions which are extremely educational as well. But what happens is, when you submit that entry online, you know, if it's an online competition, away it goes. It's being judged on a digital platform. Hopefully those judges are judging on calibrated monitors, so they're seeing exactly what it is that you're submitting from your computer. If you're entering a print competition, you usually, nine times out of 10, have to submit a digital format of that as well. So in most cases you submit the digital image first, and then you have to go and print your image, make sure it's printed properly, which I'm gonna talk about in a minute. And then you've gotta have that matted and presented before you can ship it off to that competition. And there's always deadlines, and then if you're like me, you're usually leaving it 'til the last minute. (laughs) I remember one year, not so long ago, I actually took a photograph the day that deadlines closed, and I spent three minutes editing it, and I submitted it, and it won the category. (laughs) (audience laughs) But I also recently read a blog post by a very well known photographer, and he had an image printed at, I think it was Walgreens, and submitted that. So, now I'm not gonna recommend that, but I am gonna talk to you about that process of what to consider when it comes to entering print competitions. Because there's so much, and not only have we been talking about impact, creativity, and all of those things throughout the previous segments with our five shoots, and creating beautiful storytelling portraiture, but this is what kind of led me down my path of entering competitions. When I first entered, I submitted pretty photographs. And I got some okay scores, because in terms of what else was being submitted in those same categories, they stood out in terms of the technical excellence, in terms of the quality of the print, but there wasn't anything really to them. They were just a pretty picture. So, you kinda have to decide how much impact do you wanna have on a judge. And it's those storytelling elements that come through in a photograph that really make those judges kind of read into it, tell their own story. And some of you have looked at some of my images that I've taken over the past few days, and seen things in it, or interpreted into an element of your own, and come up with your own idea, which is really fascinating. And the one thing I love the most when I'm sitting there and watching judging, is when they start to comment on an image, and their interpretation of it comes out. It's like, well that wasn't really my goal, but that's pretty cool that they actually saw that, because they're reading into it, and you can't read into an image unless you are trying to portray a story. So it's really important, and that's what led me down that storytelling path. So I started to create more images for myself, from personal projects, more images of my family members, but a lot of it was for this entering competitions to see where I sit in terms of industry standards, which was extremely important to me. So we go through that whole process of what the photograph is, how to capture it, all of those things, and then we start to consider things like the print quality, and how important that is, which I'm gonna talk about in a second. And then the viewing conditions, and we have like a little viewing station here, and its got a light underneath it. So there viewing stations are at every print competition. And what they do is, they cast a light on the image which allows the judge to be able to come up really close and see all the finer detail in that print. If you have a high key image, and I've printed a brighter image and then a darker image. If you have a high key image, it then goes and it looks fine here, but then it goes under the light, and there's no detail in those highlights. The judges are gonna see that. So that's why I was talking a lot about controlling those highlights in camera, because if there's no information there in the file, it's not gonna print any information in those highlights. So they wanna see detail throughout the entire image. Every single pixel. And then the scoring ranges, which we're going to talk about as well. And originality. So, you can be inspired by something, but be inspired to make it better, or be inspired to create something uniquely different from that. It's like, I showed the photograph of my Mum holding up another photograph of her. That sort of scenario had been done before, but I had to make it different. I had to be original. I needed to be able to show the judges a different story, a different concept, with that same sort of style of image that I was presenting them.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Mind Map & Prep Guide

Ratings and Reviews

user-2c88c4
 

Among a sea of wonderful teachers here at CL, Kelly is the cream of the crop. All of her classes are outstanding and this one is no exception. Amazing teacher. Amazing class. Amazing education. If you are hoping to stretch yourself to create deeper more meaningful stories in your images, or are feeling the pull of print competition but need some direction, this is definitely the class for you. Thank you Kelly!

Melissa Soto
 

Kelly Brown is a true inspiration. She has been my idol in this industry since I began. This class was amazing. I love how honest, authentic and genuine she was. But most importantly I loved her wise direction and teaching style. Kelly brown thank you for this gem. You helped light a fire in me. I’m so excited to start telling amazing stories with the skills I have learned from this class.

Marjorie Stevenson
 

Just loving this class! Kelly is one of my favorite instructors. She is very good at articulating her ideas and carrying them to an absolutely wonderful end product. Her images are always stunning. I love that she always puts safety first with her models. Thank you Kelly for sharing your creative visions with us.

Student Work

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