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Commercial 3D Composites in Adobe Photoshop CC

Lesson 11 of 11

3D Composite Enhancements & Backgrounds

 

Commercial 3D Composites in Adobe Photoshop CC

Lesson 11 of 11

3D Composite Enhancements & Backgrounds

 

Lesson Info

3D Composite Enhancements & Backgrounds

So now let's add fume or elements to our background here. So I'm gonna go and create a new layer above the background there and a little bit of a Grady in here at the bottom. Start on the bottom here, and it's gonna drag it up. Notice it's on its own layer. Mile looks a little overbearing. I'm just gonna change the blend mode of this layer now toe overlay. It gives me a little bit better fade up there, so I'm going to save here and get a little bit of a fade coming in. So it's just not a flat blue bottle. It has some variation of color there, but then why stop there? Go and get my brush tool and let's go ahead and get a little flare element. I don't want to get one of my big flares and get one of my I don't have enough brushes here. Where did it Gov is gonna get that the fault? One. There you? No, I like that one year ago, so now it's going to go here in ad some random dot elements. It's the midnight energy shot. Another element here. We'll go in here and create a new layer above the l...

abel. Let's put another flare. Maybe a little speculator flare on the logo itself. I'm going get one of my pre sent flares here. These flares are included in the course download. So you can definitely use these. I'm gonna rotate this brush 90 degrees because our label is rotated 90 degrees. And before you think there, somebody's bound to ask this question that happen for I've been asked, Why don't you just rotate the art? And that way you can work right side up. It will rotate it on the part product as well, so you technically could rotate it and then work on it and then rotate it back. The problem is, when you do saves to update to see how it looks in the bottle, it will be that rotation. So you've got to kind of think sideways here a little bit. So, uh, I'm just gonna go and add this little dab right here and maybe enhance it a little bit with a little outer glow yellow and I go there it is right there. Save it there. Oh, it's looking good. Now it's had a little bit more info it's, uh, we had a tagline here. When any designer knows this when it's and, oh who all nighter to think? Two things make that little, uh, go. It's an all nighter. Don't matter. One word or two. I don't remember. We'll go with you. Put that right under the label there. Save it. How's it look? Not bad. It won't kill you. Let's put that right up here at the cap. And here we go. So again, here I'm stretching out the text because it's text. It's, um, again nondestructive because it's ah, it's still it's a text layer. So there we go. So close that and save it. Now we see what we've got here is a cool product with the labeling. So now let's put it in some more context here. Let's kind of finish it up with placing it on the surface. So here I have a texture, just a marble slab texture here when I'm going to use this as the surface to place my object on someone removed. The color is something I've always talked about with textures is that I keep a massive library of textures when I'm deciding on a texture for a design. I rarely ever pay attention to the color of a texture because your info to shop, you can change the color anything you want. So in this case, I'm going to remove the color that is like the texture, not the color. I'm just gonna go on shift, command you and it's going to bring it over into the working document here, scale it up to fit a limit that never again. So now what I want to do is create or put it in three D space for it to be a surface for the product to sit on. Now, do not need to create the extrusion like I did with the other three D objects. It's not necessary because it's gonna be a flat surface. We're only going to see that front for surface. So there's no point creating a lot of volume with it. So we're gonna make a three d postcard, Um, like we did earlier before something going here to the three demon you got a new mesh from layer and choose postcard. So again, he we've got this in three D space, despite the fact that it is a still to the image that there is a flat image in three D space. It's going to reset the view here and reset the object position. It's now an emergent with my other objects, and so you can see here. The layers kind of got the 23 D layers, but I needed them interact with each other. I need this bottle to sit on that service and reflect and cast shadows on me like that. So I need to merge them into the same three D layer. So when you do that, it's going to assume whatever lighting properties have been applied to the lower layer. So if I had the texture below like this and I merged this layer down to the postcard layer, I'm gonna lose the lighting I applied. So in order to, um, to retain that, I'm gonna put the texture at the very top above the three D object, and it's gonna go and emergent down. You can use the same keyboard shortcut used to merge two regular three D layers simply breast Commander Control E. That murders it down. So now the bottle is currently wedged into the wall right there. Now, when I do that a couple times, but I think my positioning of my object we reset my view. The bottle position there. There we go. All right, so once again, I'm gonna emerge that down. So now it's landing upright, so there is the bottle, and it's just kind of hanging out in the wall there. So even though you'll notice here in the three d pen or are in the layers panel, rather, the three D layers have been merged into a single three D layer. However, in the three d panel, those elements are still separate. We still have the shape, which is the bottle. We have a layer one mess, which is that background element. Now you can rename these if you got a lot of different objects, and and just so you know you can murder, you can merge multiple layers. The most layers I have merged into a single three D layer was that watch images. So and I think it was about nine or 10 3 D layers merge into a single air. So and that's one of those things where I was thinking. I wonder if it'll work cause I kept pushing. Every time emerged the next one I'm like, Is it gonna crash? Is No, it didn't. I was like, Oh, I can keep it Links, So But you really have a problem. If you get two or three objects, you've got merged together. You're really gonna not gonna run into too much of a problem once you get up into 9 10 11 objects merge, save a lot, That's all I can tell you. So what we need to do is reposition the that texture. So I'm gonna go in here and select the layer one mash. Now it's going to double click it and rename it. Will this coolant floor and what is called this one bottle, we'll select that. And right in here, the properties panel gonna go into the coordinates tab. Here's where you can actually numerically change the position, angle and scale of your three D objects. What I want to do is just simply rotate this texture surface degrees down. So I go to the X angle here to set it to 90 and there you can see puts it now, instead of being parallel to the other object is now perpendicular to it. So if I going to move. Take this around. Now it's coming through the bottom. Obviously, though, the positioning is still off, so I'm going to select the four element itself. And if you go into the layer pop out menu here, you're going to see an object at the very top. It says move, object to ground plane. So, like that slams it down to the floor to now we've got the bottle perfectly sitting flush to the floor. So now I'm going to select the bottle element and let's scale it down the little large for the ground plane here now about scaling and, of course, lifts it off the ground plane and has it hovering above the floor. So now with a select the bottle this time and then do the same thing Move, Object to Graham plane. Now, I'm gonna go in here into my layers. Let's make the background black. Riggio, push this up a little bit. Now I'm gonna go in here and adjust my camera settings. The default is that 67 millimeter. I'm actually gonna make this a wider angle. Let's go with about 40 this time, which may be still a bit much, but I'm gonna go and go with it. Let's bring it closer. And the cool thing is, you can really get dramatic angles. In fact, I'm gonna rotate the camera a little bit, get a really kind of low dramatic angle here on the product. Now let's adjust the lighting. Now, I'm gonna go in here and see we got an infinite line applied here in front line is think of it is just light shining in one direction in a discovers the whole area. It's a stunning at one direction. I want this to be a little bit more focused light, so we're gonna change this to a spotlight. So when you have the lights selected here in the three d panel, go into the properties panel and you've got a type menu here and you can changes to a point spot or infinite light as it is going to do a spot and you'll see the image go dark now, right here in the panel. You see, the panel changed a little. There are two buttons here for point at origin and moved to view him to click both of those. And that's gonna put the light and it's wire frame right in view here, so I can better position it now. I won't lie to you if you're new to three D in photo shop. The lighting is the most difficult part to get used to. But it also is simultaneously. What makes the three D objects look awesome is the lighting. So I'm gonna grab my three d tool here and just give us a little light, a little bit of rotation here, and let's just slide it up and turn it out. We're gonna spotlight our product right there, and you can actually adjust the hot spot here. You can see you got hot spot in cone setting so I could make the cone wider. And I can also adjust the hot spot here. So you can Really? As I said, you're you're essentially conducting the photo shoot of the product as you're designing the final image. So you have a profound degree of control here. I wanna just my ankle a little bit more here. Now, I'm also gonna want to set some reflection on that surface there. So I go in here and select a floor element and the layer one which is a material and let's set the reflection and shine. It's a little bit high and let's see what that's gonna look like here. So I'm just gonna do a little bit of a render. But it's got a little bit of an area selected, and that's looking pretty good so far. Now you'll notice there's this white line here, this little shape right here that is actually the IBL being reflected on the surface. In fact, if I go in here and move around the IBL there, you can see it's adjusting on that plane there now, just so that's a little less prominent on the floor element. I'm gonna go in here in two the properties and just below reflection, you'll see a setting for roughness number. When I talked about roughness earlier on the ground plane reflection, it gives it that little bit of a fade. Same principle here is going to take this to about 15. Yeah, this is adjust the lighting on this product here. I think I'm an increasing amount of reflection on the object as well. Now this will. The roughness will soften that reflection and will also soften the reflection of the bottle. You can see it starts is what? So you can see it's getting a little bit where it's receding. Maurin that space there. It's a little too much reflection on that surface. I'm gonna dial that banks. There's too much of a hot spot. There's a model that reflection back just a little bit more hands. And this is where the rendering really comes into play because you don't see reflections like this until they are rendered. So that reflection dialed up just a little bit more. But now, also, what I wanna just is the shadow that's being cast by the bottle itself. You see here to start the render again. You see, that shadow has got a very hard edge to it. I wanted to have a more of a faded edge as it gets further away, like you would expect to expect it to have. So when you have the light selected, I'm going here into the spotlight and right in here in these light settings. This is where we have selected spot, but right below that you have the intensity of the light which could dial down maybe a little bit. But you also have the softness of the shadow so that I'm gonna set to about 25. And I'm also going to select that ground plane element. I'm gonna use the widget here. We just hover your mouse over a particular property on the widget and allows you to edit on that specific axis. But I'm gonna hover over the cube in the center here, and this is the universal scale objects. If I click a nut and drag on a scale the size of that floor element there, if I grab my current view, move it around, see what we've got going on here. So just my angle here and let's just go ahead and initiate another render. And I think that looks pretty good. So I just know it going in at a background and add the other text elements and just go ahead and finish up the ad. But so if you're dealing with another element like the screw cap, are you doing a separate extrusion and then bringing it in, emerging it down? I mean, how would you approach that if it's not just one? If I wanted to take the cap off, if you want to show a screw cap rather than just one like shrink wrapped texture. Oh, yeah, Yeah. You can certainly do that. Um, like what? Yes, obviously. I created this where it's like it's a shrink wrapped effect. So if you wanted to see the cap and the edge like that, I would still continue it as one shape. You know what? Let's go out and do it to this one. I'm gonna go in here and select the object. Go to that edit source. So what I would do is kind of zoom in here. So then add a few more control points here. So we take this one here, just gonna push it up. Just kind of give us a little bit of a rounded edge there. So you want to have an element kind of dip up inside? It creates that little dip of the cap in there. Obviously, I would change the color, but this is just giving you an idea of how you would change the shape. This is his quick and dirty. But now you can see and obviously I'd have to adjust the ah, the label aren't every like Now you can see that there is a very different separate very definite separation of a cap to the bottle in. Now, if I wanted to have the cap where I could have the cap lifted up, maybe I wanted to have a splash coming out of the top of the bottle. And then I would created a separate object merging together. Like you saw me doing that. I was just reposition it and then just tilted a little bit. And then you could have the element coming out of there. So that's one way to do it. You mentioned, you know, the processing power required for something like this. You just remind people the type of computer, the process of using anything people need to know before they get into this. Yeah, this this particular machine I've got tapped out with the Rams has got 16 gigs of Ram, and this is a mid 2015 Mac book Pro running Sierra. Of course. So I would recommend at least 16 gigs of Ram. That doesn't mean you can't get a good render. You're just gonna have to wait a little longer on a smaller machine. So But I would recommend at least 16 gigs of To save a lot of time as far as the rendering processing goes. But but yeah, I mean, all the really complex stuff I've done. I've done right here on this on this laptop, so long as you and that's obviously keeping the final size is rather small. If you are someone who is doing large format or even, um hi, rez prints like that, you're obviously gonna be adding some time on it, depending on how big it's going to be. And like I've said before, if I was building a and let's say I was doing a poster 18 24 size poster, I would build the three D elements in smaller files and buy smaller. I mean smaller dimensions that you can manage, then possibly even rest. Arise those in the original file and then drag and drop. It is a rast arised image into your final layout, so essentially creating the three D elements in a separate place almost as if it was a photo shoot in another room. Then bring it into your design fell. That would help speed up of the workflow you

Class Description

With the ability to create 3D text and objects in Dobe Photoshop you can create fully realized commercial concepts in a fraction of the time. In this course, we will put together a complete commercial product composite using custom 2D and 3D elements as well as stock 3D objects.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

Reviews

Lael
 

Valuable for going deeper into using 3D tools, the course had a great amount of info on using the 3D tool panels & manipulating lighting, modeling materials, merging elements together in 3D space, creating your own lighting & materials as well as trouble-shooting tips. Really helped me feel less intimidated as a newcomer to 3D.