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Creative Text Effects in Adobe Photoshop CC

Lesson 3 of 7

Distressed Text & Infinite Light Effects

 

Creative Text Effects in Adobe Photoshop CC

Lesson 3 of 7

Distressed Text & Infinite Light Effects

 

Lesson Info

Distressed Text & Infinite Light Effects

if you wanted to damage it a little bit. Text like this, you know, obviously got the harsh edges, and I can. But if you wanted to add some dings to the surface of the text, just give it a little bit more wear to it. So if I go in here and I've got a texture here, it's just got some random small dings in itself. I guess this is just a stone texture, but I'm gonna process it a little bit Here, remove the color and by pressing shift command, you boost the contrast here, and I'm really gonna push the whites here. I want to get just a few random specks of dark elements there to something like this, and that's all it's gonna be. So we go on image signs all these textures, especially when they're abstract texture elements your applied or three DS. They don't need to be massively resolution. Massive resolution files. Typically, I keep the moment at the longest dimension I keep him at around 2500 pixels. Doesn't need to be more than that. Any more than that, you're just overkill, and it's just ...

gonna be taxing in your processor for no reason. So So this health only a little bit more efficient. So I'm gonna take this and save it to the desktop, and it's gonna call it bump because we're gonna be applying. This is about Matt. So? So to think, that thing to think about a za bump map that we're gonna play this asked is it's gonna distort the image. Now, the way Photoshopped looks at the bump masses that the darker areas are gonna get pushed back, lighter areas get pulled forward. So what we want to do is we won't apply this to the bevel of the text. Gonna go in here and select that bevel material again. We're not seeing the front face. We're just seeing the devil. Oh, and by the way, when I went in here into and made that bevel 100% I left the angle of 45. You can actually dial that down if you don't want the angle as harsh. I mean, right now it's a steep 45. I'm gonna dial that back a little bit. I think I would be like 40. There we go. So now with that bevel material selected, I don't know why I closed my properties. But I did. There we go. Were to go down here and you see the bump sitting right here. I'm gonna go to the little menu icon here, over on the far right and just simply choose load texture. We're gonna locate our bump image. There it is. Click open. And now you can see we've got little dings on our text here and now, once you've applied the texture, you can go in here into the same menu. We applied it and do edit UV textures and use these settings here. I really ever used tile, but with scale and offset go in here and just use describe inside of you actually repositioned the bump on the surface of the object. There, you can determine where you want to see and its it looks pixelated. And Greg says I haven't rendered it yet. We're still in draft mode, but you go in here and adjust the scale of position of the bump map and even the intensity If you don't want the dings in it to be quite a deep just going here, the default is 10%. But I'm gonna drop that down there like five, and then when you're ready, just do a render. It's gonna get a three D and do render three. Dealer. I won't let. I won't make you sit through the whole render. Usually it's pretty quick, but rendering is gonna reveal a lot of the effects you don't see while you're working. We did see the reflection there, but it's gonna you'll see reflections in the neighbouring letters on each other when you do the render and stuff like that. But that is how you can get truly bubble text with realistic surfaces such like that they could have one more thing here by going here because you have to add this finishing touch. One thing I didn't get into yet. Eyes lighting. We've got the IBL that's giving us the chrome look on it. But if you go into the light section of the three d panel, here's the very top click on this, a lightbulb icon. You'll notice that we've got the environment properties. This is where we access Thea Ibl, but just below that you have what's called an infinite light. This is what's created by default. It's just a light that's you see this little visual aid in the center here. It's basically a universal light, and this little line and the ball indicates the direction of the light. Now, we're not seeing any Reineri reaction on the surface of the text because of the IBL is kind of overpowering it. But what are you going to do is change this into a point light. So just go into the properties panel. You've got three different types of lights you can choose point spot and infinite. Infinite is the default point. Light is merely a small wire frame elements. Is this little yellow wire frame It emits light in all directions. Think of it is just a little ball of light hitting everywhere in all directions. I'm gonna put this really close to the text. There's nothing I love about three. D is that you can treat your essentially almost doing a photo shoot where you're lighting an element Azure designing it. Sorry, photographers. It's true, But I'm gonna really dial up fantasy. I can't even see where its position get the camera view. If I rotate my camera, you can see where it is in relation to the text. I'm gonna I want to move it much closer here. That's another thing about working with you Never mess with three D. You gotta gotta wrap your head about thinking in three D when you're working because we're used to things working in two D and you see you're working alone. What you see, you might miss something in a three d element that, uh, you wouldn't see without maneuvering around. So let's put that it's just not showing up. I think the idea was too much. At any rate, I'm gonna make a new layer, and I want to use the flare I created a while ago. Where is it? There it is. I'm gonna go right to the bottom of the H here, set my foreign color toe white and then just then to blend it to the scene. Let's add the outer glow show. All affects our blue sample. The yellow. It's in the scene already. Remember, I said, a hard light tends to show it the best. Bring the capacity up. It's curious that it's showing up ready, even though it's yellow. There it is. That's better. But ultimately, there you have very cinematic devil. Texan Michael

Class Description

You'd be amazed what you can do with text effects in Adobe® Photoshop® now. In this course, we will explore a few popular effects being used now and how to implement them into your own work. We will also take a look at how 3D is rapidly becoming a big part of the design space in Adobe Photoshop.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

Reviews

Beatriz Stollnitz
 

I can't think of anyone better than Corey to teach this class. He's an expert in the design features of Photoshop, and is able to explain them clearly. He shows how to create beveled text using 3D and 2D features, how to create neon text and how to reflect plastic text on a surface. If you have a background in graphic design or 3D, you will be able to follow along comfortably. If you use Photoshop mostly to do basic photography tasks, you may have to watch the class twice and take lots of notes. Thankfully you can do that if you buy the class.