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Crochet Maker 201: Hats

Lesson 6 of 13

Pompoms: Finger Method

Vickie Howell

Crochet Maker 201: Hats

Vickie Howell

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Lesson Info

6. Pompoms: Finger Method

Lesson Info

Pompoms: Finger Method

all right. And this course we're gonna be covering two different ways to make pom poms. And the first way is what I like to call the quick and dirty pom poms. This is if you don't have any equipment around. If you aren't super picky about it being like the perfect like sphere of all time, this is going to give you just a really loosey goosey kind of almost scraggly, Which sounds negative, but I actually kind of love a scraggly pom pom that looks like this. This is a really find a way to make them. And it's really great if you're working with kids to, um and so this is how it's done. So all you need is one strand each of colors A and B, and you're just gonna wrap him around your fingers a trillion times or 50. Either way, your choice, I honestly don't necessarily count. But the pattern will tell you 50. So you're wrapping. Hopefully you're not cutting off all your circulation. If you'd like it to be a little more spherical, I'm gonna show you a super like, perfectionist way to do it in ...

another lesson. But you can also just cut a piece of cardboard because obviously, like obviously my fingers are not going to be the same with all the way from here to here, so it's not gonna be perfect, but I'm totally Coolio with that. So then you're gonna slide the little bunch off and then take a strand of the yarn and wrap it around the bunch. And I like to leave in a make sure to leave enough of the tail so that I can use it to sew it onto the hat leader. My mom makes the most perfect pump homes I've ever seen in my entire life. And I think that's one of the reasons that I have, like, stuck with scraggly because I just like I could not live the dream. It just never happened. Like it's like a square knot. She's been trying to teach me how to tie the perfect square knot bow for decades, and I just never collect. So I kind of embraced the sort of quirkier side of things, and scraggly pom poms like this are one of those one of those quirky things. So you've got a little bunch now. It looks like a little like Bob in or Butterfly. And now you're just gonna take your scissors to it. You're gonna go through when you're gonna cut the loops and you'll see things starting to puff up. Repeat that for the other side. So right now it's like, crazy style, like Look at that. It looks like a Muppet, but and I'm cool with that. But maybe not that cool with it. And he's a little bit of a haircut so that I feel confident about it. So I would just, like, take my scissors and just give it a bit of a trip. And this is one of those things where you know you need to learn when to walk away because you could keep again. This is not the method where you should try and create that Perfect. Um, you know, orb at all. This is not the method for that. What you want to make sure is that you just don't have, like, the crazy like that's this strand right here is clearly way longer than the rest, so it's gotta go, but I'm not going to try and make them uniforms. I just want to see if there's any big strands catching my eye. If you don't know when to walk away, you'll end up with nothing left and well to start over. Okay, so there's a couple left here. I want to make sure that my tails are that I don't cut my tails up and I've done that before and it's so sad cause then you've got nothing. Teoh had a bust up a hot glue gun. There's nothing you can do that at a tie. You kind of fluff it up a bit. I love the little scraggly muffin of a pompon, and then you're going to just take it. And I would do with my I would grab a tapestry needle again, and I would feed the tales through the tapestry needle, obviously, And then I'm gonna just take it. And there's this big old hole from the top of our crown. I'm just gonna dive right in, feed that through it, and then I'm gonna flip it over and then just kind of start sewing because there's that big hole. I kind of want to seem that up just so it'll have a nice, stable foundation, and you're just gonna just kind of weave into it and just get it A secure is you can just till you get it done and keep checking it. If it still feels to weebly wobbly, just go back, go back And you might want to dive your needle in and kind of wiggle it through and grab some more of those hairs, hairs, strands. I just lost one of mine. So I was working with the double Strand at that point. And I'm kind of okay with that, cause what I'm gonna dio I'm gonna secretly Not even though there's not as many knots and crush a is one would think. And then I would just weave in the ends by just kind of going over and under over under throughout the hat, pulling it through, given a little stretch out and snipping. And then, of course, you'd want to weave in all of your ends. You can see we have a ton of them from changing colors and from all of our different steps. But overall, we did all of the steps. And now we're done. And we have this cool little to begin. So we are ready to move on to the next hat

Class Description


A creative practice such as crocheting is best learned with others, particularly as your ambitions begin to outpace your technical knowledge. When your only method of advancing your skills come from flat diagrams and instructions in a book, the prospect of making new garments can seem daunting.

Master crafter Vickie Howell will help you visualize and create beautiful hats in this fun, informative class. Join us, and you’ll learn:

  • How to crochet a toboggan hat and a granny square hat
  • How to crochet ear flaps and braided ties for your toboggan hat
  • How to crochet the crown and ribbed brim for your granny square hat
It can be hard to set aside time for your creative outlet, and even harder to put time and energy into doing the research and legwork to advance your skills. Vickie Howell turns this formula on its head. Your craft should be your inspiration, and learning new techniques should be fun, attainable, and energizing.

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