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Crochet Maker 201: Hats

Lesson 2 of 13

Toboggan: Getting Started & Working Crown

 

Crochet Maker 201: Hats

Lesson 2 of 13

Toboggan: Getting Started & Working Crown

 

Lesson Info

Toboggan: Getting Started & Working Crown

All right. So the first hat that we're gonna be making today is a what? I'm calling a toasty to bargain, and it is just kind of a general hat. But then we've added here flat flaps on it when I say we any me just me ear flaps and then braids super fun and really cozy. And one of the things that makes it cozy is that it's worked with a double strand of yarn. So I'm gonna get you started. And we are going to talk. You're in for a second. So this is worsted weight yarn. I'm gonna use two strands of it. Um, two different colors. I'm making stripes. No, you could go with the chunkier yarn, for sure, but I love this skill just because I feel like it keeps your stash your urine stash at home even extra versatile, because if you don't have a heavier weight, you can create a totally different looking urine or weight of yarn by just doubling or tripling, or we're gonna whatever. Six toppling is called for the braids later. And to do that, you can either buy two balls of yarn and just pull them ou...

t and hold them together. Or if you want to sort of save on money or just be more practical, you can pull one strand from the outer edge and the other strand you'll see in here from the centre pulled from the center. And then they could be united and sweet Yarny love as a double strand. So you're gonna be working with them as if they were one strand. But they are too. All right, we're gonna be using I'm using a size K hook. Please take time to check. Your gauge gauge never really matters. If you're making a scarf for a rapper, anything rectangular. But once you want something to actually fit you, it's really important that you're getting the same amount of stitches per inch and per round that the pattern calls. For now, Crow Shea in particular, is very, very subjective when it comes to gauge. If you think of it this way, this is sort of something that's not talked about a lot in the crush. A community but gauge could be totally different, even amongst professionals, because people's grip are so different If you think about how you shake somebody's hand, if you are a loosey goosey hand shaker. You're probably also gonna be a loosey goosey crow share, which means that your stitches are going to be bigger. Your gauge is gonna be larger. If you have a nice, tight, firm handshake, you might have a nice, tight, firm and or super tight stitch count. And it's totally fine. But you might have to go up or go down one or maybe even to hook sizes. It's not a big deal. You just find you, do you? But just make sure that you doing you also means crushing a swatch. Okay, so we're gonna go ahead and get started. This hat has worked from the crowns of the top of the head down and crush a hats in general are usually worked that way because of the way that the crush a stitch is built. It really is nice to be able to start and let it just grow. And then you're also not getting any of the firmness that sometimes from the very beginning chain can happen around the the white ist part of your head. So I'm gonna bring in this hat you can't really see because the pom poms in the way, But we're gonna be starting right here at the very center. This is called the Crown, and we're going to start from the very tip top. So to begin, we're gonna make a slip knot by making a little kind of, like, loop de loop or crash a or Excuse me like a person e bring the yarn that's at the top under, Push it through and you've got that loop. Then you're gonna bring your hook in place the loop on the hook, and then you pull the strands so that their firm but loose enough that you can slide it up and down the hook. Okay, I'm gonna move my yarn over in my left hand side just because I find that it gets in my way a little bit less, and then we're gonna get started. So to begin this, we're going to chain four one to three for then we're gonna turn this into a ring by slip stitching in the first chain that we made and that just created a ring. You can kind of see that That ring right here. Okay, so now we're ready to start round one for round one we're gonna change three. And this is just to create the height of the double crush a stitch. This does not count as a double crush a stitch to sew whenever you're reading stitch counts, pretend like it doesn't exist. You're just we only chain that just to give you the height. And now we're going to make 12 Double crow, Shays or D C is the abbreviations, and the abbreviations as well as this pattern are found in the bonus material section of this course page. We're in a your in over. Insert into the center of the ring you're in over. Pull through urine over. Pull through the 1st 2 loops, urine over. Pull through the 2nd 2 loops, and that is one double Cochet. But we need 12. Right? So you're in over were established urine over. Pull through two groups once and twice. We're gonna go ahead and repeat this until we've got 12. If you're working along with me and are curious about what hook I'm using, this is a more crochet hook by clover. It's one of my favorite tools to work with. I find that the yarn slips off really nicely with the plastic at the tip. And plus the ergonomic handle is really comfortable toe work with. Okay, so we've got + We're halfway there. Seven, eight, nine, 12. OK, so we've completed this round. Except for we need to join with a slip stitch at the top chain of that beginning, Chain three. So we see that right here. There's the first change. Second chain, third chain. So we need to go in and slip stitch, and I go under both loops of that stitch you're in over your gonna pull through all the loops that are on the hook and check you out. You just made a circle. Now you're officially you're officially crushing shapes. All right, so that's the very tip top. I got cocky that I said, You're making shapes. I left out a stitch. We're also going to be joining a new color. So I'm gonna go ahead and undo that slip stitch so that I can said, Aiken, join the new color when you're joining a new color and crow Shea for the the next row, You want to actually join it at the end of the previous row? It just looks a little bit nicer. So I'm gonna pull in my color be and again, inserting the stitch or the hook through that third chain. I'm gonna lay the new color over the hook, and I'm gonna pull it through all the loops. So it's joined with a slip stitch, and I've also joined the second color Okay from here, we're gonna work around too, so we need to get that height. This hat is all almost all worked in double Cochet. So we always need to do that. Chain three to create the height of the round. And then we wanna work to double crow shays in every double Cochet around. So you can see this is the double crush A from the stitch below from the row below round blow. Rather. So we're going Teoh urine over. Insert through the loops of the stitch. Well, that urine through. So now we're over in the position we need to be at. Then we're gonna do our double crush A but we need to do to in each stitch. So you're in over in that same loop and that's what to double cross shays and one stitch looks like it kind of looks like a little V. We're gonna do that in every stitch all the way around. And what this is doing is it is increasing. So for size, just as your head would, you know, gets bigger as you as it slopes downward. But also this particular method. We'll make sure that your circle is laying flat. You have to add stitches every round to accommodate for the height for your circle toe lay flat. Okay, we're halfway there. Double crush a once twice getting close. All right, so it's really so just last year. And it's really common for Crow shares to not be entirely sure if they worked the last stitch or not. It's just kind of the nature of the way things lay, so I always recommend we know the pattern tells us that we should have stitches by the end of this round. And remember that that Chain three doesn't count, so I like to go back and count. 12 3456789 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 2122. We only have 22 so we know that we must have missed the very last stitch. So that means this one. You may have been able to see that already, but I like to just do a double safety check one to right. So we've got our 24 are row around is done. But now we're gonna We need to join the slip Stitch as we did before. But remember, we're changing colors. We have a strike pattern. So every round every other round is gonna be every other color. Right? So we're going to pick up the urn and loosely carry it up the back. We're gonna insider hook in the top of the chain three. You're in over with that color A and pull that. Make sure you grab both strands, pull that through the loop, and then I give the color be just a little tug just so it tightens firms it up. And now we're ready for round three. So where we always know that we need to create the height. So we started with the chain three. So now to keep our circle flat. And this is just a general sort of formula for creating a circle when you're using double Cochet. What you want to do is your increasing. Um, you're increasing the 12 stitches every round, So by the end of this round, we're gonna have 36 stitches. So that means we can't double Cochet twice. And every stitch of just the math doesn't work out. Right. So we need to double cross Shea twice in the first stitch and then just once in the other. So we're gonna alternate, and that looks like this. So we're double crushing once, twice in that one. Aaron is going crazy over here, and then we go to the next stitch, which is right here. We're just going to double Cochet once in that one. Now, if you find yourself not knowing where to work your your next, it's just it happens. Sometimes we all kind of fade out. Sometimes you could always just kind of use your finger and trace up. Okay, I see that clearly. That's a stitch. It starts here, but it looks like this is the top of it. If you just kind of use your finger and follow up you'll now, that's where the top of the stitches. All right, so this one, we need to work to. If you decide that the double strand in the urine just is not your gig as long as you find a chunk here. Wait, That gets the exact same gauge. You can swap that out and use a single strand. Totally. Your call. I just like being able to grab. I tend to have a lot more worsted weight, urine just laying around the house just because it's a really good, versatile Wait, So it just saves me a trip to the store, to be honest with you, when I know that I can double triple quadruple strand just to get whatever weight that I want. And plus, it's kind of fun to play with, um, with gauge and see how things look differently. You can also strand with different colors if you wanted to, um really sort of. The creative glass ceiling is built by no one would eat, But you you do. You do you while you're crushing this hat. All right, so we're getting closer. We're doing these increases. Worked one in the last one, so I know I need to in this one. One to one years ago, I designed a basket project for a column I was writing for any We've Cochet magazine, and, um, I wanted to use this particular worsted weight urine. That was my urine line at the time, but I wanted it to be a super chunky, chunky, bulky basket. And so I think that I might have used up to upwards of six strands just to get the look that I wanted, which is, you know, it's fun because it gives you a versatility that you wouldn't have have if you just have to work with a yarn in the way that it was intended at all times. Oh, and I just Look, I just made a little mistake. So this is good to stop. Make sure that you're stopping and looking every couple of seconds, Whatever. Every couple of stitches would probably make more sense to make sure that you are keeping in pattern, which is to double Cochet and one stitch, and then one double crochet in the next. You can see here I have to double Cochet. But then I didn't and then one in the next one, so that's all good. But this should have been a to double crush a right, but it is not so. I know that I need to pull that out that last one out and work the such the second D. C. In that same loop. I'm a cautionary tale. Let's just put it that way. Just make sure to keep checking. The gig is like it doesn't really make a huge, different and hat size if you miss a stitch once in a while, probably not. But what it will do when you work when you're working in circles is it will make it a little like thick Octa. It'll make it'll it won't labour, particularly flat and it won't be shaped is nicely. So it's just one of those things that you need to check on. The cool thing about Double Cochet is, and especially if you're working with something chunky like this, is that it's really easy to see. Um, so the likelihood of you, you know, working rounds and not noticing that is pretty slim. Okay, So again, just to double triple check, I'm gonna count and make sure that I did actually do everything that I needed to dio. So for the end of round three, we said that we needed to have 36 stitches, and we remember that the first change three doesn't count. So we ignore that. So I'm gonna go ahead and count. 123456789 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1920 2122 24 25 to 67 28 to 9 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 Winning. We totally did it. So we're good. So now we need to join it. The slip, such as we have before. But don't forget we're switching to the color. Be so we drop our color A we bring up color be and we're going to insert the hook and join with a slip stitch All right, our circles looking pretty sweet, but we still need to increase most. If you were making a little kids hat, this would probably our baby, not a kid, Probably a baby baby. You'd probably be pretty close to being as big of a circle is You need for your overall crown, but were making an adult hat. So we are going to keep increasing. So we're changing three and for this round again, we know that we need to every round to make a perfectly flat circle in Double Cochet. We know that we need to increase 12 stitches every round. So now to do that, we need to get up to 48 stitches. And so to do that, we need to double Crow Shea twice in that first stitch. And then we're going to double Cochet once in the next two stitches this time. So it's a double single single. Or I should say it's 211 because you're not ever single crushing. All right, so, too we need to do one, 211 We know we're on a two now. I realized I did the thing again. Where is zoned out and did not put to in the next double Cochet. And the reason why I'm not like disc rushing along pretending like that didn't happen is I want you to feel confident that kind of stuff happens to everybody. It doesn't matter how many years you've been crow saying You get into a zone. It's actually kind of meditative to crush a, um, and so sometimes you may skip something, so it's just just check in on yourself every once in a while. other cool things that you could do with circles like these. If you decided that your circles or your jam, um, you could use thes two dio of ton of technical things like you could make. You could make two of these little circles and you could make them into a pillow. You would just need to keep increasing 12 stitches every round. And then you could make your circle is as big as you wanted to. I mean, you could you could go full on rug size if you wanted. You would just keep, um, making sure that you increased 12 stitches per round. And the way that you know how to do that is that you just increase the amount of individual double crushes there are in between the increases. So the two double crushing in the stitch so you could just go on and go on and go on. So it was really cute if you wanted to do a little housewarming gift with maybe some cotton and some smaller a smaller hook make coasters for someone you could make A If you use something like a rafia. You could make kind of a cool tote bag out of circles. They're really fun to make. So you can kind of do whatever you want now that you've got this particular skill. Okay, we're getting pretty close to being done with us. See, It did to their that one. So I know I need to do another one. Okay? We're almost done with this round. Okay, so we have now completed all of the increases that you need to dio for this entire hat, which means that we have created the entire top of the crown, and you can see I haven't joined it yet, but you can see that it does actually lay flat once you get it done. So we're gonna join the round again, pulling up that second color. This is would be color A. We're gonna join with a slip stitch, and that completes the crown, and we're now ready to move on to the body of the hat.

Class Description


A creative practice such as crocheting is best learned with others, particularly as your ambitions begin to outpace your technical knowledge. When your only method of advancing your skills come from flat diagrams and instructions in a book, the prospect of making new garments can seem daunting.

Master crafter Vickie Howell will help you visualize and create beautiful hats in this fun, informative class. Join us, and you’ll learn:

  • How to crochet a toboggan hat and a granny square hat
  • How to crochet ear flaps and braided ties for your toboggan hat
  • How to crochet the crown and ribbed brim for your granny square hat
It can be hard to set aside time for your creative outlet, and even harder to put time and energy into doing the research and legwork to advance your skills. Vickie Howell turns this formula on its head. Your craft should be your inspiration, and learning new techniques should be fun, attainable, and energizing.

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